31 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2021
  2. Aug 2021
    1. I'm wondering exactly what problem that LOUD standard is meant to be solving exactly? It doesn't appear that any of the meta data they're listing is over and above anything that's already extant?

      If you're going to propose a new set up, why not add some bits to fix the newer problems that have popped up like for paying creators? Being able to inject ads? Better track the number of listens? How far into the file did the listener get? How many ads did they hear?

      And let's not forget:

  3. Jul 2021
    1. I guess my Pastor wanted to take today off. We didn't have church today, which is strange. OK interesting question that someone brought up on Twitter. Is it weird that you can't tweet from an RSS reader? I mean, someone said they don't use RSS for this reason.

      @ladyhope It is weird. It's also something that the IndieWeb community has been working on fixing. There is a class of social feed readers (using Microsub, and including micro.blog) that allows one to subscribe and read, but also allows one to reply inline and post to their own websites (which could then also syndicate to social media sites). indieweb.org/social_re... has some examples, including several you could dovetail with your WordPress site.

      Syndication: https://micro.blog/chrisaldrich/11655781

  4. May 2021
    1. This is a solidly comprehensive overview of much of what I'd want in my own personal reader. I'll have to revisit it as I'm reading and using other readers to see if there are any other pieces missing.

      Being able to sort by social distance, by community/tags, and by posting frequency and/or post type (ie separating articles from notes from bookmarks, etc) would be some of the bigger must haves.

  5. Mar 2021
    1. Some interesting, but small subtleties between Atom and RSS described here. So few people dig into these things at this level anymore.

  6. Feb 2021
    1. I have so many ideas about this. The first one being that it's awesome.

      While WordPress is about websites, it's also got a lot of pieces of social media sites hiding under the hood and blogrolls are generally precursors of the following/followed piece.

      Blogrolls were traditionally stuck on a small widget, but I think they now deserve their own full pages. I'd love to have one with a list of all the people I follow (subscribe to) as well as a similar one with those who follow me (and this could be implemented with webmention receipts of others who have me on their blogroll). I've got versions/mock ups of these pages on my own site already as examples.

      Next up is something to make these easier to use and import. I'd love a bookmarklet or a browser extension that I could use one click with to have the person's page imported into my collection of links that parses the page (perhaps the h-card or meta data) and pulls all the data into the link database.

      I always loved the fact that the original generated OPML files (even by category) so that I could dump the list of data from my own site into a feed reader and just go. Keeping this would be awesome, but the original hasn't been updated in so long it doesn't use the updated OPML spec

      If such a currated list is able to be maintained on my site it would also be cool if I could export it in such a way (similar to OPML) as to dovetail it with social readers like Aperture, Yarns, or other Microsub servers to easily transport or mirror the data there.

      Here are some related thoughts: https://boffosocko.com/2017/11/10/a-following-page/

      I'm happy to chat about other useful/related features relating to this any time!

  7. Oct 2020
    1. Where’s my next dashboard? I imagine a next-gen reader that brings me the open web and my social circles in a way that helps me attend to and manage all the flow. There are apps for that, a nice example being FlowReader, which has been around since 2013. I try these things hopefully but so far none has stuck.

      I'm currently hoping that the next wave of social readers based on Microsub and which also support Micropub will be a major part of the answer.

    1. What I dwell on the most regarding syndication is the Twitter stuff. I look back at the analytics on this site at the end of every year and look at where the traffic came from — every year, Twitter is a teeny-weeny itty-bitty slice of the pie. Measuring traffic alone, that’s nowhere near the amount of effort we put into making the stuff we’re tweeting there. I always rationalize it to myself in other ways. I feel like Twitter is one of the major ways I stay updated with the industry and it’s a major source of ideas for articles.

      So it sounds like Twitter isn't driving traffic to his website, but it is providing ideas and news. Given this I would syndicate content to Twitter as easily and quickly as possible, use webmentions to deal with the interactions and then just use the Twitter timeline for reading and consuming and nothing else.

    1. Although I’ve already got a blog (you’re reading it!), I decided not to mirror my book reviews here. I post normal content so infrequently that anyone who wanted to read the blog but wasn’t interested in book reviews would be inundated with content they didn’t want. In the end, I spun up an additional WordPress instance on my web space (something that my host, Krystal Hosting, makes very easy to do) to keep the reviews completely isolated from everything else.

      This seems to be a frequent excuse for people to spin up yet another website rather than attempting to tackle the UI subscription problem.

      Social readers would be well advised to think about this problem so people could have a single website with multiple types/kinds of content.

      Platforms should better delineate how to allow publishers and readers to more easily extract the posts that they're interested in following.

    1. Aside: I'd also like to explore minimaps in the future to visually represent unreads in a compact way.

      It would be cool if I had a way to look at the creation times and flow of someone's personal wiki and view new branches and leaves in a visual way. The Fraidyc.at reader is the beginning of a way of doing this, but isn't exactly the thing. Perhaps if it had read statuses? And went beyond the 10 or so most recent things using storage? It already does a good job with some temporality pieces.

    1. Now all information belongs to a single category, and it all pours through a single channel.

      If this is true, then I desperately want to know how I can manage to feed books through this channel too. I'd often prefer to read those...

    1. There are still some wrinkles to be ironed out in getting the various platforms we use today to play well with Webmentions, but it’s a real step toward the goal of that decentralized, distributed, interconnected future for scholarly communication.

      The fun, secret part is that Kathleen hasn't (yet?) discovered IndieAuth so that she can authenticate/authorize micropub clients like Quill to publish content to her own site from various clients by means of a potential micropub endpoint.

      I'll suspect she'll be even more impressed when she realizes that there's a forthcoming wave of feed readers [1] [2] that will allow her to read others' content in a reader which has an integrated micropub client in it so that she can reply to posts directly in her feed reader, then the responses get posted directly to her own website which then, in turn, send webmentions to the site's she's responding to so that the conversational loop can be completely closed.

      She and Lee will also be glad to know that work has already started on private posts and conversations and posting to limited audiences as well. Eventually there will be no functionality that a social web site/silo can do that a distributed set of independent sites can't. There's certainly work to be done to round off the edges, but we're getting closer and closer every day.

      I know how it all works, but even I'm impressed at the apparent magic that allows round-trip conversations between her website and Twitter and Micro.blog. And she hasn't really delved into website to website conversations yet. I suppose we'll have to help IndieWebify some of her colleague's web presences to make that portion easier. Suddenly "academic Twitter" will be the "academic blogosphere" she misses from not too many years ago. :)

      If there are academics out thee who are interested in what Kathleen has done, but may need a little technical help, I'm happy to set up some tools for them to get them started.

    1. A return to RSS or is there something else again in the development of the web?

      There are other options out there, though in many cases distribution is uneven. There are new specs like JSONFeed which many sites and feed readers support just in the last year.

      There are also simpler methods than RSS now including the microformats-based h-feed which one can use to create a simple feed that many feed readers will support.

      Part of RSS's ubiquity is that it is simply so prevalent that most common CMSs still support it. The fact that the idea of RSS is so old and generally un-evolving means there isn't a lot of maintenance involved once it's been set up.

    1. More ways to combat feed overwhelm Before IndieWebCamp, we had a discussion about Readers in a traditional Nürnberger restaurant. Here also, people came up with some ideas to deal with accruing unread-counts. One idea came from how Aperture deletes posts after 7 days. This actually prevents the overload. It would be nice if you can tell your reader that, for example your Twitter feed, is ephemeral and that the posts can be discarded if you did not read them in time. One other idea that came up was to keep track of the average time between posts of a certain feed. This way a Reader could boost posts when they are from a feed that is not regularly updated. These kind of posts are usually lost in piles of more posts from more frequently updates feeds. Yet a last idea was to tell your reader to leave out posts with certain words for a small period of time. This can come in handy when you haven’t watched the newest episode of Game of Thrones yet, but want to stay connected to your feeds without spoilers.

      Some good ideas here to deal with feeds.

  8. Dec 2019
    1. And I am planning on cutting back on my personal use of social media (easier said than done) and want to try to return to using my blog more than Twitter for sharing.

      certainly a laudable goal!

      It helped me a lot to simply delete most of the social media apps off of my phone. I scribbled a bit about the beginning of the process back in November and there's a link there to a post by Ben doing the same thing on his own website.

      More people are leaving social feeds for RSS feeds lately. I've recently started following Jeremy Felt who is taking this same sort of journey himself. See: https://jeremyfelt.com/tag/people-still-blog/

      Kudos as well to making the jump here:

      Taking a bit of a Twitter break. I'm going to try to stay off until the new year, but likely lack the willpower to stay off for more than a few hours. Wish me luck!<br><br>....but silently. Not via reply to to this tweet. Cause that'll just suck me back into the vortext.

      — Clint Lalonde (he/him) (@edtechfactotum) December 19, 2019
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

      In part, it's what prompted me to visit your site to write a comment. (Sorry for upping your cis-gendered white male count, but 2019 was a bad year, and hopefully we can all make 2020 better as you've indicated.)

  9. Feb 2019
    1. The feed readers. Just as the RSS standard spawned lots of “reader” and “aggregator” software, so there should be similar feed readers for the various data standards described in (1) and the publishers described in (2). While publishers might have built-in readers (as the social media giants all do), the publishing and reading feature sets need to be kept independent, if you want a completely decentralized system.

      I've outlined a bit about how feed readers could be slighly modified to do some of this in the past: https://boffosocko.com/2017/06/09/how-feed-readers-can-grow-market-share-and-take-over-social-media/

    2. The social media browser plugins. Here’s the killer feature. Create at least one (could be many competing) browser plugins that enable you to (a) select feeds and then (b) display them alongside a user’s Twitter, Facebook, etc., feeds. (This could be an adaptation of Greasemonkey.) In other words, once this feature were available, you could tell your friends: “I’m not on Twitter. But if you want to see my Tweet-like posts appear in your Twitter feed, then simply install this plugin and input my feed address. You’ll see my posts pop up just as if they were on Twitter. But they’re not! And we can do this because you can control how any website appears to you from your own browser. It’s totally legal and it’s actually a really good idea.” In this way, while you might never look at Twitter or Facebook, you can stay in contact with your friends who are still there—but on your own terms.

      This is an intriguing idea. In particular, it would be cool if I could input my OPML file of people I'm following and have a plugin like this work with other social readers.

  10. Jan 2019
    1. “I’m always genuinely happy to interact with listeners,” he said, “and since some prefer social media, I use it. But my (thus far only modestly effective) strategy has been to try and produce enduring content and let it speak for itself, rather than posting ephemera on Facebook and Twitter at regular intervals.”

      I love his use of the word "ephemera" in relation to social media, particularly as he references his podcast about ancient history.

  11. Dec 2018
    1. feed-forward network (also known as a multilayer perceptron)

      In the network, each layer has variety of cells, which connect to next layers cells.

    1. Where’s my Net dashboard?

      Interestingly, I came to this post in my feed reader while randomly looking for something I could use as an example in something I was writing about feed readers!!!

    2. “Who do I report this to?” Everyone.

      A brilliant ending!

    3. It’s not just that the silos can shut down their feeds. It’s that we allowed ourselves to get herded into them in the first place.
  12. Nov 2018
    1. I have discovered new interesting posts by looking at the likes my friends post.
    2. I have a problem with algorithms that sort my posts by parameters I don’t know about, made by people who want to sell my attention to others.
  13. Jul 2018
  14. Jun 2018
    1. My heart forever broken by social-media silos, I’m not really interested in using Micro.blog as yet another “Okay, I’m over here now” social network. I get the impression that it has potential for much deeper use than that, if I can only get my head around it.

      Micro.blog can be many things to many people which can be confusing, particularly when you're a very tech savvy person and can see all the options at once. I'd recommend looking at it like a custom feed reader for a community of people you'd like to follow and interact with. Spend some time in the reader and just interact with those you're following and they'll do likewise in return.

      It's purposely missing some of the dopamine triggers other social silos have, so you may need to retrain your brain to use it appropriately, but I think it's worthwhile if you do.

  15. Nov 2017
  16. Jul 2015
    1. Whether or not you take a constructivist view of education, feedback on performance is inevitably seen as a crucial component of the process. However, experience shows that students (and academic staff) often struggle with feedback, which all too often fails to translate into feed-forward actions leading to educational gains. Problems get worse as student cohort sizes increase. By building on the well-established principle of separating marks from feedback and by using a social network approach to amplify peer discussion of assessed tasks, this paper describes an efficient system for interactive student feedback. Although the majority of students remain passive recipients in this system, they are still exposed to deeper reflection on assessed tasks than in traditional one-to-one feedback processes.