270 Matching Annotations
  1. Jun 2024
    1. organic dyes

      Is it is specifically about these specific dyes that dstorm requires? What would happen if you didnt use these 2 specific dyes, are there ones that allow for multicolor super resolution that just may appear as well?

    1. the real issues are Insidious they're 00:22:00 underground they're down in our our Baseline premises of understanding what life is and what it means

      for - key insight - the unconscious - fundamental assumptions are the root problem - Nora Bateson

      key insight, quote - the unconscious - fundamental assumptions are the root problem - Nora Bateson - (see below) - Even though we can point with - language and - statistics and - all sorts of measurements - to all the aspects of what we might call - the meta crisis or - the poly crisis - the real issues are: - insidious - they're underground - they're down in our our baseline premises of understanding - what life is and - what it means - To ask - what's in it for me - what's the point of this - where is this going - what am I going to get out of this - These type of questions that have to do with in some way embellishing our individual takeback - are deeply and totally unecological responses - so they're disrupting our possibility for perception

  2. May 2024
    1. there are no genes for any of those membranes all the lipids that form the membranes and the complicated 00:07:27 structures that you can see in a typical cell none of that is coded for in the genome all of that is inherited

      for - key insight - decision-making structures are in the cell membrane, not the genes

      key insight - The codes that enable us to make choices are located in - the membranes of our cells and - their protein channels - There are no genes for - any of those membranes - all the lipids that form the membranes and the complicated structures that you can see in a typical cell - None of that is coded for in the genome - All of that is inherited

  3. Apr 2024
    1. nah mate, youre taking the matrix too literal. just like every great piece of art, the matrix shows the conflict between different personality types. this is timeless, or "classical", because personality types are a part of natural order, laws of physics, laws of macro-chemistry. conflict between different personality types? in the matrix, it is "machines" versus "humans". or as charlie chaplin said "machine men with machine minds".<br /> at its core, its a question of personality type. some people have this inborn mechanistic world view, who want to rationally compute everything, who prefer security over freedom, who prefer fear over lust, who prefer knowledge over feeling. and on the other side you have "humans" who prefer feelings and intuition. like morpheus says "you can FEEL something is wrong".<br /> and to this day, the conflict between different personality types remains the great mystery, which is the basis of slave morality, aka religions, aka politics, aka idealisms, aka blue pills.<br /> by accident, i have created a hypothesis to solve this fundamental problem: how do we have to connect different personality types to crate stable groups? in chemistry, we know exactly: how do we have to connect different atoms to create stable molecules. but for humans? we have no fucking clue! because spoiler: pacifism is the problem which leads to overpopulation degeneration hunger collapse war.<br /> blah. read my book:<br /> pallas. who are my friends. group composition by personality type

    1. HOW TO IMPROVE TO MOTHER TONGUE LEARNING Begin literacy teaching in mother tongueA curriculum, rooted in the child’s known language, cultureand environment, with appropriate and locally-developedreading and curriculum materials, is crucial for earlylearning success. Using the home language in the early stagesof schooling in multilingual contexts supports child-centricpolicies. It starts with what is familiar and builds in newknowledge. It creates a smooth transition between home andschool; it stimulates interest and ensures greaterparticipation and engagement. This prepares children for theacquisition of literacy and encourages fluency andconfidence in both the mother tongue and, later, in otherlanguages, where this is necessary. Ensure availability of mother-tongue materialsChildren need to be engaged in and excited about readingand learning and this can only be done if the materials areones which they will understand and enjoy. In mostdeveloping countries, the only reading material children seeare school textbooks, which are often in very short supply.Other materials to support learning are hardly everavailable. Without access to good materials, children struggleto become literate and learn. In most low- and middle-income countries, the majority of primary schools have nolibrary, and books are luxuries which families cannot afford.For children from minority language communities, thesituation is even more dismal. Textbooks are rarely availablein local languages. Provide early childhood education in mother tongueLiteracy development starts early in life, and the homeenvironment is an important factor in children’s learningachievement. It helps build the knowledge and skills childrenneed for learning to read. Where parents and the communityare supporting literacy development, results show a markedimprovement. The earlier children are exposed to stories thebetter their reading is: reading for only 15 minutes a day canexpose children to one million written words in a year,thereby helping them to develop a rich vocabulary. Childrenwith access to materials at home are more likely to developfluency in reading
    1. it follows that no purchasable articlecan supply our individual wants so far as a key to our stockof information is concerned. We shall always be mainly de-pendent in this direction upon our own efforts to meet ourown situation.

      I appreciate his emphasis on "always" here. Though given our current rise of artificial intelligence and ChatGPT, this is obviously a problem which people are attempting to overcome.

      Sadly, AI seem to be designed for the commercial masses in the same way that Google Search is (cross reference: https://hypothes.is/a/jx6MYvETEe6Ip2OnCJnJbg), so without a large enough model of your own interests, can AI solve your personal problems? And if this is the case, how much data will it really need? To solve this problem, you need your own storehouse of personally curated data to teach an AI. Even if you have such a store for an AI, will the AI still proceed in the direction you would in reality or will it represent some stochastic or random process from the point it leaves your personal data set?

      How do we get around the chicken-and-egg problem here? What else might the solution space look like outside of this sketch?

    2. That is not the case.It is true, a variety of published indexes, catalogues and biblio-graphies to periodical and other literature exists, but they donot and cannot meet our individual case, for1 Every individual moves in a sphere of his own and coversindividual ground such as a printed index cannot touch.2 Printed indexes although they give usable information,cannot go sufficiently into details, they must studyabove all the common requirements of a number ofsubscribers sufficiently large to assure their existenceand continuance (apart from the question of adver-tising).

      Kaiser's argument for why building a personal index of notes is more valuable than relying on the indexes of others.

      Note that this is answer still stands firmly even after the advent of both the Mundaneum, Google, and other digital search methods (not to mention his statement about ignoring advertising, which obviously had irksome aspects even in 1911.) Our needs and desires are idiosyncratic, so our personal indexes are going to be imminently more valuable to us over time because of these idiosyncrasies. Sure, you could just Google it, but Google answers stand alone and don't build you toward insight without the added work of creating your own index.

      Some of this is bound up in the idea that your own personal notes are far more valuable than the notes someone else may have taken and passed along to you.

    1. We need to rebuild a world outside of the grip of the globalist organisations behind the coup, outside of the grip of fascist corporations who would destroy us and the planet for power and profit, outside of the grip of the unelected billionaires parasite class, far from the grip of the corrupt governments who think they are gods and we are their canon fodder, who pretend they care about our welfare while destroying our lives. These people are our civil servants but we have let them act as our masters for too long.

      We need to go off the grid, off their evil grid, outside of the control of these psychopaths, these leeches, these parasites who have been bleeding us dry for too long.

      they control everything, so its hard to find ways to effective resistance…

      ive been thinking about this hell on earth for 20 years, and the bottleneck i found are human relations. we just have no fucking clue, how to arrange human relations to create stable groups.

      im afraid this is no accident, but deliberate sabotage from above: they dont want slaves who are well-organized, self-sufficient, free. george carlin: “They don’t want well-informed, well-educated people, capable of critical thinking. … They want obedient workers. People who are just smart enough to run the machines and do the paperwork, and just dumb enough to passively accept all these increasingly shittier jobs”

      possible solution: Pallas. Who are my friends. Group composition by personality type. https://milahu.github.io/alchi/src/whoaremyfriends/whoaremyfriends.html

    1. the supervisormust therefore be prepared to carry the system a step furtherwhenever occasion arises. There is therefore an opportunity tobring individuality into play. If we are not prepared to assert ourindividuality within and without the limits set by the system, wemay depend upon it that our collaborators or subordinates willassert theirs, consciously or unconsciously, and we shall find inthe end that our system has been distorted in all directions, withoutnecessarily transgressing our rules, although the latter will be buta matter of time.

      This advice also generally applies to one's one personal zettelkasten, much less a group version.

  4. Mar 2024
    1. here in germany, cops are planning to ban my book, in which i propose an answer to the illegal question "who are my friends?" this question is illegal, because efficient human relations are the foundation of any successful organization, but the empire hates competition, and the empire hates tribalism, tribe wars, small states, minarchy, secession, decentralization, free markets, ...

  5. Feb 2024
    1. The purported reason seems to be the claim that some people find "master" offensive. (FWIW I'd give that explanation more credence if the people giving it seem to be offended themselves rather than be offended on behalf of someone else. But whatever, it's their repo.)
    1. One of my inquiries was for anecdotes regarding mistakes made between the twins by their near relatives. The replies are numerous, but not very varied in character. When the twins are children, they are usually distinguished by ribbons tied round the wrist or neck; nevertheless the one is sometimes fed, physicked, and whipped by mistake for the other, and the description of these little domestic catastrophes was usually given by the mother, in a phraseology that is some- [p. 158] what touching by reason of its seriousness.

  6. Jan 2024
    1. dreaming can be seen as the "default" position for the activated brain

      for - dream theory - dreaming as default state of brain

      • Dreaming can be seen as the "default" position for the activated brain
      • when it is not forced to focus on
        • physical and
        • social reality by
          • (1) external stimuli and
          • (2) the self system that reminds us of
            • who we are,
            • where we are, and
            • what the tasks are
          • that face us.

      Question - I wonder what evolutionary advantage dreaming would bestow to the first dreaming organisms? - why would a brain evolve to have a default behaviour with no outside connection? - Survival is dependent on processing outside information. There seems to be a contradiction here - I wonder what opinion Michael Levin would have on this theory?

    1. 1:10:00 identity politics: the only stable "identity" is personality type, which is inborn and constant for life.<br /> my heresy: i found a hypothesis for the question: how must we connect different personality types to create stable groups?<br /> "the system" likes my work so much, they are threatening to bust my door, steal my stuff, and throw me in jail for five years, as a punishment for publishing my radical answer to the question: who are my friends?<br /> my book: pallas. who are my friends. group composition by personality type

    1. It doens't take into account the mental labour of actually assigning each card a numeric alpha address.

      I appreciate that he takes a moment to acknowledge that this step of assigning numbers and arranging is work. Many gloss over this.

      The work put in up front ideally pays off later.

      • for: COP28 talk - later is too late, Global tipping points report, question - are there maps of feedbacks of positive tipping points?, My Climate Risk, ICICLE, positive tipping points, social tipping points

      • NOTE

        • This video is not yet available on YouTube so couldn't not be docdropped for annotation. So all annotations are done here referred to timestamp
      • SUMMARY

        • This video has not been uploaded on youtube yet so there is no transcription and I am manually annotating on this page.

        • Positive tipping points

          • not as well studied as negative tipping points
          • cost parity is the most obvious but there are other factors relating to
            • politics
            • psychology
          • We are in a path dependency so we need disruptive change
      • SPEAKER PANEL

        • Pierre Fredlingstein, Uni of Exeter - Global carbon budget report
        • Rosalyn Conforth, Uni of Reading - Adaptation Gap report
        • Tim Lenton, Uni of Exeter - Global Tipping Report
      • Global Carbon Budget report summary

      • 0:19:47: Graph of largest emitters

        • graph
        • comment
          • wow! We are all essentially dependent on China! How do citizens around the world influence China? I suppose if ANY of these major emitters don't radically reduce, we won't stay under 1.5 Deg C, but China is the biggest one.
      • 00:20:51: Land Use Emissions

      • three countries represent 55% of all land use emissions - Brazil - DRC - Indonesia

      • 00:21:55: CDR

        • forests: 1.9 Gt / 5% of annual Fossil Fuel CO2 emissions
        • technological CDR: 0.000025% of annual Fossil Fuel CO2 emissions
      • 00:23:00: Remaining Carbon Budget

        • 1.5 Deg C: 275 Gt CO2
        • 1.7 Deg C. 625 Gt CO2
        • 2.0 Deg C. 1150 Gt CO2
      • Advancing an Inclusive Process for Adaptation Planning and Action

      • adaptation is underfinanced. The gap is:

        • 194 billion / year
        • 366 billion / year by 2030
      • climate change increases transboundary issues
        • need transboundary agreements but these are absent
        • conflicts and migration are a result of such transboundary climate impacts
        • people are increasing climate impacts to try to survive due to existing climate impacts

      -00:29:46: My Climate Risk Regional Hubs - Looking at climate risks from a local perspective. - @Nate, @SoNeC - 00:30:33 ""ICICLE** storyllines - need bottom-up approach (ICICLE - Integrated Climate Livelihood and and Environment storylines)

      • 00:32:58: Global Tipping Points

      • 00:33:46: Five of planetary systems can tip at the current 1.2 Deg C

        • Greenland Ice Sheet
        • West Antarctic
        • Permafrost
        • Coral Reefs - 500 million people
        • Subpolar Gyre of North Atlantic - ice age in Europe
          • goes in a decade - like British Columbia climate
      • 00:35:39

        • risks go up disproportionately with every 0.1 deg C of warming. There is no longer a business-as-usual option now. We CANNOT ACT INCREMENTALLY NOW.
      • 00:36:00

        • we calculate a need of a speed up of a factor of 7 to shut down greenhouse gas emissions and that is done through positive tipping points.

      -00:37:00 - We have accelerating positive feedbacks and if we coordinate policy changes with consumer behavior change and business behavior change to reinforce these positive feedbacks, we can help accelerate change in the other sectors of the global economy responsible for all the other emissions

      • 00:37:30

        • in the report we walk you through the other sectors, where their tipping points are and how we have to act to trigger them. This is the only viable path out of our situation.
      • 00:38:10

        • Positive tipping points can also reinforce each other
        • Question: Are there maps of the feedbacks of positive tipping points?
        • Tim only discusses economic and technological positive tipping points and does not talk about social or societal
  7. Dec 2023
      • for: climate crisis - elites, Kevin Anderson - elites, carbon emissions - elites, adjacency - elites - carbon inequality - incentives - luxury - capitalism

      • title: A Habitable Earth Can No Longer Afford The Rich – And That Could Mean Me And You

      • author: Kevin Anderson
      • date: Nov. 29, 2023

      • comment

      • adjacency between
        • elites
        • capitalism
        • free market
        • incentives
        • double bind
        • wicked problem
        • inequality
        • carbon inequality
        • luxury industry
      • adjacency statement
        • This article was pulled by "The Conversation" for being too controversial
        • It addresses the double-bind / wicked problems that we find ourselves in.
        • It's not just that the elites that are the highest per capita polluters, but
          • it is an indictment of the entire philosophy and worldview of capitalism and the market economy which produces winners and losers and
          • the winners reap enormous resource benefits, including being able to afford luxury items as rewards which constitute the largest ecological footprint of all
        • while at any one time, there is always a minority of the 1%, who hold the most outsized ecological footprint of all, the logic that produced that 1% also serves as the incentives for the majority of the 99%, who because of the inherent precarity created by capitalism, will fight and struggle to become part of that 1%
        • So while one generation of the 1% die off, a new generation is born and created by the incentive structure of scarcity and precarity.
        • In this sense, capitalism has its own self-reinforcing, positive feedback loop that keeps the masses of the disenfranchised aspiring to the same high resource and ecological footprint, luxury lifestyle
        • Look at the culture industry of sports, entertainment, movies, music, TV, etc. and of business in general. The leaders of these and ALL fields are celebrated as heros and they all reward themselves with an ultra-high carbon intensity, luxury lifestyle.
        • Unless we do more than simply demonize the current set of elites, and recognize the root cause and change the incentive structure itself, we will only ever deal with the symptom and not the problem, and continue to generate the next generation of elites
        • The luxury lifestyle industry is a important role-player in the self-reinforcing feedback loop
    1. Will artificial intelligence create useless class of people? - Yuval Noah Harari

      1:00 "bring the latest findings of science of the public", otherwise the public space "gets filled with conspiracy theories and fake news and whatever".<br /> he fails to mention that ALL his beautiful "scientists" are financially dependent on corporations, who dictate the expected results, and who sabotage "unwanted research".<br /> for example, the pharma industry will NEVER pay money for research of natural cancer cures, or "alternative" covid cures like ivermectin / zinc / vitamin C, because these cures have no patent, so there is no profit motive, and also because the "militant pacifists" want to fix overpopulation this way.<br /> a "scientist" should be someone, who has all freedom to propose hypotheses, which then are tested in experiments (peer review), and compared to real placebo control groups. because that is science, or "the scientific method". everything else is lobbying for "shekel shekel".

    1. many people are complex systems thinkers even though they don't know it
      • for: example - systems thinking, quote -: many people are complex systems thinkers

      • quote:

        • many people are complex systems thinkers even though they don't know it
      • Thomas Homer-Dixon
      • date: 2023

      • examples: complex systems clichés

        • the whole of greater than the sum of its parts
          • nonlinearities
        • the straw that broke the camels back
          • emergence
      • comment

        • the first one could be that systems are not the same as just all the parts
        • the second one could also represent Tipping points and nonlinearities of complex systems
    1. well I'll start with two extremely optimistic points
      • for: answer to above question

      • answer : two answers

        • first, the elite have the majority of
          • wealth
          • control of setting policies
          • control of the media
          • and they work really hard at controlling policy and media
          • and the people
            • hate the system
            • generally hate them
        • second, social tipping points occur. Something happened in over place, then it spreads to other places
    1. in many parts of the world you see a kind of conservative suicide that conservatives are abandoning their kind of traditional role to slow down and conserve 00:26:09 institutions and traditions and so forth and they still call themselves conservatives but they become this kind of new radical party which is more about ignoring traditions and destroying 00:26:23 institutions and then it becomes the job of liberals to be the audience of the institutions
      • for: insight - conservatives destroying instead of conserving
  8. Nov 2023
    1. excessive expectations and reliance on CCUS
      • for: quote - Carbon Capture expectations - unfeasible

      • quote

        • If oil and natural gas consumption were to evolve as projected under today’s policy settings, this would require an inconceivable 32 billion tonnes of carbon captured for utilisation or storage by 2050,
          • including 23 billion tonnes via direct air capture to limit the temperature rise to 1.5 °C.
        • The necessary carbon capture technologies would require 26 000 terawatt hours of electricity generation to operate in 2050,
          • which is more than global electricity demand in 2022.
        • And it would require over USD 3.5 trillion in annual investments all the way from today through to mid-century, which is an amount equal to the entire industry’s annual average revenue in recent years.
    1. overpopulation is just another intelligence test, and most people are failing, again.<br /> the problem is pacifism, the solution is permanent tribal warfare and legal serial murder.<br /> but first there is depopulation, killing 95% of today's population. fucking useless eaters... byye! no one will miss you.

      Delete The Garbage. World Cure. RD9 Virus. The Brothers Grimsby 2016<br /> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HGG0Nq3BwqQ

  9. Oct 2023
    1. "Without the right to tinker and explore, we risk becoming enslaved by technology; and the more we exercise the right to hack, the harder it will be to take that right away" - Andre "Bunnie" Huang

      hah, we are already "enslaved by technology". ask Ted Kaczynski

      our enemies already have hardware backdoors, compromising emissions (tempest), closed-source firmware/drivers/hardware, ... but sure, "feel free"

  10. Sep 2023
    1. This Be The Verse<br /> by Philip Larkin

      They fuck you up, your mum and dad. <br /> They may not mean to, but they do. <br /> They fill you with the faults they had<br /> And add some extra, just for you.

      But they were fucked up in their turn<br /> By fools in old-style hats and coats, <br /> Who half the time were soppy-stern<br /> And half at one another’s throats.

      Man hands on misery to man.<br /> It deepens like a coastal shelf.<br /> Get out as early as you can,<br /> And don’t have any kids yourself.


      Philip Larkin, "This Be the Verse" from Collected Poems. Copyright © Estate of Philip Larkin. Reprinted by permission of Faber and Faber, Ltd. Source: Collected Poems (Farrar Straus and Giroux, 2001)

      Reference: Larkin, Philip. Collected Poems. New York: Farrar Straus & Giroux, 1989.


      Compare with The Kids Are Alright.

      Recited in Ted Lasso, S3 https://www.looper.com/1294687/ted-lasso-season-3-episode-11-maes-poem-sounds-familiar/#:~:text=To%20jog%20your%20memory%2C%20the,extra%2C%20just%20for%20you.%22

      See also: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/This_Be_The_Verse

    1. Recent work has revealed several new and significant aspects of the dynamics of theory change. First, statistical information, information about the probabilistic contingencies between events, plays a particularly important role in theory-formation both in science and in childhood. In the last fifteen years we’ve discovered the power of early statistical learning.

      The data of the past is congruent with the current psychological trends that face the education system of today. Developmentalists have charted how children construct and revise intuitive theories. In turn, a variety of theories have developed because of the greater use of statistical information that supports probabilistic contingencies that help to better inform us of causal models and their distinctive cognitive functions. These studies investigate the physical, psychological, and social domains. In the case of intuitive psychology, or "theory of mind," developmentalism has traced a progression from an early understanding of emotion and action to an understanding of intentions and simple aspects of perception, to an understanding of knowledge vs. ignorance, and finally to a representational and then an interpretive theory of mind.

      The mechanisms by which life evolved—from chemical beginnings to cognizing human beings—are central to understanding the psychological basis of learning. We are the product of an evolutionary process and it is the mechanisms inherent in this process that offer the most probable explanations to how we think and learn.

      Bada, & Olusegun, S. (2015). Constructivism Learning Theory : A Paradigm for Teaching and Learning.

  11. Aug 2023
  12. Jun 2023
    1. If we hand most, if not all responsibility for that exploration to the relatively small number of people who talk at conferences, or have popular blogs, or who tweet a lot, or who maintain these very popular projects and frameworks, then that’s only a very limited perspective compared to the enormous size of the Ruby community.
  13. May 2023
    1. Please can we (a) retain case information from the email address the student uses to set up their account (in case their mailbox is case sensitive), and use that when sending password reset emails, etc., but also (b) when checking credentials for login or setting up an account, treat the email address as non-case-sensitive. The upshot would be if someone registered with Student@City.ac.uk, all emails would go to Student@City.ac.uk, but the student would be able to log in with student@city.ac.uk, and if someone later tried to set up an account with student@city.ac.uk they'd be told that the user already exists.
    2. Although there's an argument for keeping case sensitivity for the local mailbox (as they can be case sensitive, depending on how they're set up, though I haven't come across case sensitivity in university emails), the domain part of the email address is not case sensitive and should not be treated as such. Please can we (a) retain case information from the email address the student uses to set up their account (in case their mailbox is case sensitive), and use that when sending password reset emails, etc., but also (b) when checking credentials for login or setting up an account, treat the email address as non-case-sensitive. The upshot would be if someone registered with Student@City.ac.uk, all emails would go to Student@City.ac.uk, but the student would be able to log in with student@city.ac.uk, and if someone later tried to set up an account with student@city.ac.uk they'd be told that the user already exists.
    1. If you are storing email addresses then you probably should store them in their original case (the recipient at least) to be safe. However, always compare them case-insensitively in order to avoid duplicates.
    1. However, it's difficult to rely on a case-sensitive email address in the real world because many systems (typically ones that have to handle data merging) don't preserve case. Notably systems that use email addresses for user IDs, or any system that has to collate data from multiple sources (CRMs, email broadcast systems, etc) will either normalise case or treat them case-insensitively.
    2. However, for all practical purposes in the modern age, I believe you can consider email addresses to be case insensitive.
    1. a SHOULD is always trumped in RFCs by a MUST. The fact that hosts SHOULD do something means that they might not and I just wanted reassurance that, in reality, the SHOULD is a bit more widely adopted than its definition implies.
    1. While email addresses are only partially case-sensitive, it is generally safe to think of them as case insensitive. All major providers, such as Gmail, Yahoo Mail, Hotmail, and others, treat the local parts of email addresses as case insensitive.
    2. According to RFC 5321, the local part of the email address is case sensitive. This means that, in theory, SoMething@something.com is not the same as something@something.com. However, email providers have the liberty to treat the local parts as both case sensitive and case insensitive.
    1. Are Email Addresses Case Sensitive? Technically, the answer is yes. However, email addresses are typically not case sensitive; if you type your email address into a form and accidentally capitalize one or two letters, it probably won’t prevent the sender from emailing you.
    2. The local part does, in fact, take the case into account, as per RFC 5321. However, Email Service Providers (ESPs) are aware of the potential confusion that could result from allowing upper-case letters.
    1. In short, while it’s technically possible to make the part before @ case sensitive, most popular email servers do not allow that. 
    2. Most big email providers like Gmail, Outlook and even company email address hosted on Google Suite are not case sensitive. Just to avoid any unnecessary confusion. However, in extreme cases, some large companies, implement case sensitivity on their server as some people can often have the same first and last name. But in general, this creates more confusion, than the usability, which is why most standard email providers avoid case sensitivity. 
    1. Either way, at some point almost everyone started treating addresses as case-insensitive.
    2. Despite it being commonplace to “fix up” email addresses by lowercasing them — or, in financial/government contexts, uppercasing them — email addresses are clearly defined as case-sensitive in the only standard that matters.
    1. Since using case insensitivity is so widespread, take their sign up email address and make it lower case. Whenever they try to log in, convert that to lowercase as well, for comparison purposes, when you go to see if the user exists. As far as sign up and sign in go, do a case insensitive comparison. If the person signs up as Steve@example.com, you'll still want to allow them to sign in later with steve@example.com or sTeVE@example.com.
    2. But you should also keep track of the email address that they signed up with in a case sensitive fashion. Any time you send an email to them, be sure to send it with that original casing. This allows the email server to handle it however it feels like it needs to. So even though the person may always be signing in to your site with steve@example.com, if they signed up as Steve@example.com, you'll always send email to Steve@example.com, just to be safe.
    3. The de facto standard is to treat local mailboxes as case insensitive, but the official standard says case matters (though even the official standard mentions the de facto standard).
    1. So yes, the part before the "@" could be case-sensitive, since it is entirely under the control of the host system. In practice though, no widely used mail systems distinguish different addresses based on case.
    2. In short, you are safe to treat email addresses as case-insensitive.
    1. Since the case sensitivity of email addresses can create confusion and delivery problems, most email providers and clients either fix the case if the email address is entered in the wrong case, or they ignore upper-case entries. Not many email services or ISPs enforce case-sensitive email addresses.
    1. Stop to think about "normal app" as like desktop app. Android isn't a desktop platform, there is no such this. A "normal" mobile app let the system control the lifecycle, not the dev. The system expect that, the users expect that. All you need to do is change your mindset and learn how to build on it. Don't try to clone a desktop app on mobile. Everything is completely different including UI/UX.

      depends on how you look at it: "normal"

  14. Mar 2023
    1. gaga's third question where are we going is what i want to address in these talks 00:05:26 it may seem unanswerable who can foretell the human course through time but i think we can answer it in broad strokes by answering the other two questions first 00:05:40 if we see clearly what we are and what we've done we can recognize human behaviors that persist through many times and cultures and knowing these can tell us what we 00:05:52 are likely to do and where we are likely to go from here
      • Wright points out that answering the first two questions
        • is the key to answering the third one
    2. the artist managed to harness his grief to produce a vast painting more a mural in conception than a canvas in which like the victorian age itself he demanded 00:04:31 new answers to the riddle of existence he wrote the title boldly on the image three childlike questions simple yet profound where do we come from 00:04:46 what are we where are we going the work is a sprawling panorama of enigmatic figures amid scenery

      Paul Gauguin's painting: - Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going? - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Where_Do_We_Come_From%3F_What_Are_We%3F_Where_Are_We_Going%3F#:~:text=Que%20sommes%2Dnous%20%3F,the%20themes%20of%20the%20Gospels%22. - Wright uses this painting as a appropriate introduction to his work tracing human progress because to answer the third question - where are we going? - requires answering the first two - where do we come from? - what are we?

    1. When you call 'foo' in Ruby, what you're actually doing is sending a message to its owner: "please call your method 'foo'". You just can't get a direct hold on functions in Ruby in the way you can in Python; they're slippery and elusive. You can only see them as though shadows on a cave wall; you can only reference them through strings/symbols that happen to be their name. Try and think of every method call 'object.foo(args)' you do in Ruby as the equivalent of this in Python: 'object.getattribute('foo')(args)'.
  15. Feb 2023
    1. Note though, that this only works when you're already using git for your dependency

      I was trying to figure out why it wasn't working for me. This was probably the reason.

      So if you just have gem 'rack', it just silently has no effect.

      It seems like it should just work either way. Or at least give a warning/error if you try to use this config and it's not going to use that config!

    1. "Personal knowledge management is an aid to your work, not the work itself." —Sam Matla #

      This is entirely dependent on what and how you're doing it. If you're actively reading and annotating, and placing it somewhere, then that is the work, just in small progressive steps.

      He needs to be more specific about what he means by "personal knowledge management" as a definition of something.

    1. People know it’s bad but not how bad. This gap in understanding remains wide enough for denialists and minimisers to legitimise inadequate action under the camouflage of empty eco-jargon and false optimism. This gap allows nations, corporations and individuals to remain distracted by short-term crises, which, however serious, pale into insignificance compared with the unprecedented threat of climate change.
      • it is the conservative nature of science
      • to spend years to validates claims.
      • Unfortunately, in a global emergency as we find ourselves in now, we don’t have the luxury of a few years.
      • In the case of this wicked problem, we need to find a way to make major decisions based on uncertain but plausible data
      • The misinformation has the effect of causing society to set the wrong priorities and making things worse
  16. Jan 2023
    1. 个人学习可能取决于他人行为的主张突出了将学习环境视为一个涉及多个互动参与者的系统的重要性
    1. ned the art of notetaking for themselves that this pamphletis prepared. It does not seem wise to attempt to lay down any verystringent rules on the subject. We can only suggest the more generalmethods from which every man can work out his own particular system.
    1. Primary keys and foreign keys are the fundamental building blocks of the relational database because these are the components that make the relationships work while allowing tables to be accessed independently. One-to-many relationships between primary keys and foreign keys are thus defined as referential constraints in the physical database
  17. Dec 2022
    1. this has a few sections we're going to first talk about snakes and 00:12:58 elephants then about this idea of the atman it's the sanskrit name for itself the self that's the english word and the soul or suitcase we might say in christian theology then i will introduce 00:13:10 you to my favorite illusion because it's fun and it will help us to get a fix on what we're doing and then i will argue that in fact you do really think that you have a self so there is a point to all of this there 00:13:21 would be no point if we didn't think we had self there would be no point in refuting them and then we'll fight try to ask why you think you have a self so that's what we're going to do in the first part of tonight's talk

      !- who do you think you are : has sections - snakes and elephants - the atman - favorite illusion - argument: you really do think you have a self - why you think you have a self

  18. Nov 2022
    1. I just spent a day dismantling a model, trying to find the cause of the silent rollback - taking out every association, every validation, every callback, whittling down all the code in the transaction, only to finally discover that it was return true that was the cause of it all. Or yes, an exception!
  19. Oct 2022
    1. Instead of imposing a ‘rational’ order on the fragments,Barthes used the ‘stupid’, arbitrary, obvious order of the alphabet(which he also most often followed when he was classifying his indexcards): this was how he proceeded in ‘Variations on Writing’ and inRoland Barthes par Roland Barthes. This was how he achieved anindividual identity, surrendering to his tastes and to concrete littleidiosyncrasies.
    1. Deutsch’s index, then, did not constitute the systematic and overarching view ofJewish history and contemporaneous Jewish issues that Deutsch had initially hoped tocreate. Instead, it was much more personal. It reflected his singular reading regime, and itworked with a certain shorthand: In later years Deutsch often just cited ‘Yiddish papers’or ‘Daily papers’, and in some instances he referred to ‘private information’. The cards,topics, and sources provide a sense of the specific information that interested Deutsch.
    2. Examining the cards, it becomes clear that the index constitutes not a mythic totalhistory but a specific set of facts and data that piqued Deutsch’s interest and whichreflected his personal research priorities (see Figure 2).

      Zettelkasten, if nothing else, are a close reflection of the interests of the author who collected them.

      link: Ahrens mentions this

  20. Sep 2022
  21. Aug 2022
    1. Politique documentaire Ensemble des objectifs et processus pilotant la gestion de l’information, incluant la politique d’acquisition, la politique de conservation et la politique de médiation des collections. La politique documentaire est une partie intégrante et essentielle du projet d'établissement, permettant de répondre aux missions de la structure et aux attentes des usagers.
  22. Jul 2022
    1. 5.5 Logic, reason, and common sense are your best tools for synthesizing reality and understanding what to do about it.

      5.5 Logic, reason, and common sense are your best tools for synthesizing reality and understanding what to do about it.

    2. 4.4 Find out what you and others are like.

      4.4 Find out what you and others are like.

    3. 4.2 Meaningful work and meaningful relationships aren’t just nice things we chose for ourselves—they are genetically programmed into us.

      4.2 Meaningful work and meaningful relationships aren’t just nice things we chose for ourselves—they are genetically programmed into us.

    4. 4.1 Understand the power that comes from knowing how you and others are wired.

      4.1 Understand the power that comes from knowing how you and others are wired.

    5. 4 Understand That People Are Wired Very Differently

      4 Understand That People Are Wired Very Differently

    6. 3.4 Triangulate your view with believable people who are willing to disagree.

      3.4 Triangulate your view with believable people who are willing to disagree.

    1. 25:32 - We have no social constraints anymore

      Technology has liberated us and there is nothing to constrain us, except our reflective ability. We are wired for accumulation. Americans are, on average shorter than they were two decades ago, and this is a reflection of poorer health.

  23. Jun 2022
    1. Gandhi once said, “Anything that exists is possible.

      We can also say that any human being is a also a possible reflection of our own intrinsic human nature that each of us posesses..

      Each of the currently 7.8 billion people on the planet are a combination of nature and nurture. 7.8 billion different genetic expressions of the human genome and 7.8 billion different and unique environmental conditions operating on that unique expression create 7.8 billion unique forks of the human template. One fork results in a Saint, another in a ruthless warlord. Both are reflections of what is possible when unique environments interact with our basic human nature.

  24. May 2022
  25. Apr 2022
  26. Mar 2022
    1. Hands can be a prompt, a window, a way station—butwhat they ought never have to be is still.

      Missing reference in this chapter on encouraging gestures as a tool for thought: "idle hands are the devil's workshop".

      Could the Bible have been encouraging the use of one's hands for communication??

    1. https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/idle_hands_are_the_devil%27s_workshop

      Proverbs 16:27 "Scoundrels concoct evil, and their speech is like a scorching fire." (Oxford, NSRV, 5th Edition) is translated in the King James version as "An ungodly man diggeth up evil: and in his lips there is as a burning fire." The Living Bible (1971) translates this section as "Idle hands are the devil’s workshop; idle lips are his mouthpiece."

      The verse may have inspired St. Jerome to write "fac et aliquid operis, ut semper te diabolus inveniat occupatum" (translation: "engage in some occupation, so that the devil may always find you busy.”) This was repeated in The Canterbury Tales which may have increased its popularity.

  27. Feb 2022
  28. Jan 2022
    1. Comments are turned off.

      I'd like to ask everyone to watch this 19 second long "public meeting" with comments disabled so you can see what a joke Government is.

      If you agree, please re-share. If you disagree, please explain how you think this could possibly be legitimate in the comments.

  29. Dec 2021
  30. Nov 2021
    1. today I'm here to describe that everything really is connected, 00:02:02 and not in some abstract, esoteric way but in a very concrete, direct, understandable way. And I am going to do that with three different stories: a story of the heart, a story of the breath, and a story of the mind.

      These three are excellent candidates for multimedia Stop Reset Go (SRG) Deep Humanity (DH) BEing Journey.

      It is relevant to introduce another concept that provides insights into another aspect required for engaging a non-scientific audience, and that is language.

      The audience is important! BEing Journeys must take that into consideration. We can bias the presentation by implicit assumptions. How can we take those implicit assumptions into consideration and thereby expand the audience?

      For a non-scientific audience, these arguments may not be so compelling. In this case, it is important to demonstrate how science can lead us to make such astounding predictions of times and space not directly observable to normative human perception.

  31. Oct 2021
    1. From paper to block and ink we are now learning about the printing press. The best invention at the time because you can create a news paper. And now printers are becoming obsolete and so is the news paper now a news paper is on line.

    1. DIRECTORY (in progress): This post is my directory. This post will be tagged with all tags I ever use (in chronological order). It allows people to see all my tags, not just the top 50. Additionally, this allows me to keep track. I plan on sorting tags in categories in reply to this comment.

      External links:

      Tags categories will be posted in comments of this post.

  32. Aug 2021
  33. developer.mozilla.org developer.mozilla.org
    1. If you forget to define x in the object you pass as the second argument, or if there's some similar bug or confusion, you won't get an error -- just unexpected results.
    1. Aaron linkt in zijn blogpost aan meer bronnen die ik zeker eens verder wil onderzoeken voor mijn eigen Frankopedia.

      I love that Frank calls his personal wiki / digital garden / online commonplace book "Frankopedia".

      I should come up with a more clever name for mine.

  34. Jul 2021
    1. Sending body/payload in a GET request may cause some existing implementations to reject the request — while not prohibited by the specification, the semantics are undefined. It is better to just avoid sending payloads in GET requests.
  35. Jun 2021
    1. DigiNotar was a Dutch certificate authority owned by VASCO Data Security International, Inc.[1][2] On September 3, 2011, after it had become clear that a security breach had resulted in the fraudulent issuing of certificates, the Dutch government took over operational management of DigiNotar's systems.[3]

      Dutch Certificate Authority gets hacked.

  36. May 2021
    1. First of all, I would start off presenting yourself: Dear XYZ support team I am the web developer in charge of example.com website. By presenting you this way, you are establishing the frame to treat you, hinting that you should be presupposed to be somewhat proficient, so they could choose to answer in a more technical detail.
    2. Feel free to hint, brag, or both! The best CS reps should easily take a hint from clear language and a signature like John Appleseed, JavaScript/Ruby Developer, but any will catch on with a simple line like "I know what I'm doing, so I'd appreciate an extra-technical explanation!"
    3. Hey, I'm a PhD in [field] and do [whatever] professionally. Before calling you, I've narrowed down the problem to [something on their end], so that's what needs to be addressed. If I could speak to an engineer about [specific problem], that'd be great; but if we've gotta walk through the script, let's just knock it out quickly. If they end up requiring the script, then the best way to use your expertise is to run through it quickly. Keep the chit-chat to a minimum and just do the stuff efficiently. If they start describing how to perform some step, you might interrupt them with, "Got it, just a sec.", then let them know once you're ready for the next step.
    4. However, what speaks against just straight up telling them that you're working as [Insert title of your position] and you know what you're talking about?
    5. OP is referring to letting people know they can speak like proper adults when talking about technical terms, without going through the usual nanny-like discourse that tech support has to provide to non-techies. For instance, it happened to me with Amazon support. The speaker told me exactly where to touch in order to clear the cache of the Android Amazon App Store. Given that I work as an app developer the guy could have just said "please clear the cache". No need to go through "tap here, then here, now you should see this, tap that"...
    6. I have tried different tactics of showing the tech support that I am proficient in their field of work (I work as a web developer). Specifically: using accurate terms and technologies to show my knowledge of them and telling the support that I am the "administrator" of the website in question.