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  1. Last 7 days
    1. ( ~ 10:45)

      This is basically layered learning and making use of the creation of prior knowledge.

    2. (~10:00)

      It's not just about your domain knowledge on a subject, it's also about your reading skill in general and how difficult a book is written.

    3. This video tells me I need to spend more time actually reflecting on the table of contents and title. As well as with the pigeonholing; classify in the mind in what categories this book falls.

    4. ( ~1:55)

      Interesting sentiment. Library Lin supposes that most people who do not like reading don't like it because of bad reading habits and that when they improve on their reading habits, they will start liking it.

    5. Off-topic, I love this woman's accent.

  2. Jun 2024
  3. May 2024
    1. So I'm not surprised, and perhaps the last question about user privacy.

      Question about the privacy of the user interacting with the RAG

      It doesn't seem like JSTOR has thought about this thoroughly. In the beta there is kind of an expectation that the service is being validated so what users are doing is being watched closer.

  4. Apr 2024
    1. scholar Elaine Svenonius talks about the "invisible hand of the classification system" where you serendipitously find a book on the shelf that you didn't know you were seeking.

      I've always appreciated this serendipity, but never read a source talking about it specifically.

    1. [Narrator]: The power of the MC 68000 permitted another breakthrough:the common user interface.[Bill Atkinson]: On Lisa we make each of the programs have a similar user interface,so that what you've learned from using one programcarries over and you feel naturally how to use the next.

      While the idea of a common user interface on computers may have felt like a selling point when facing a new scary machine with a variety of functionalities, did it really save that much time, effort, and learning curve? Particularly with respect to the common office tools it was replacing?

      The common user interface was really more a benefit to the company and all the companies which programmed for it at scale. The benefits are like Melvil Dewey's standardization of the Dewey Decimal Classification which allowed libraries everywhere to work on the same system rather than needing to reinvent their own individually.

      This sort of innovation with scalability is helpful as humans are far better at imitation than innovation.

  5. Mar 2024
    1. Chào mọi người, em xin chia sẻ về một người Thầy dạy em nhiều điều trong chứng khoán1) Thầy ấy rất hay khoe lãi lên facebook, lại còn là một Giám đốc học thuật của một trung tâm nên em rất tin tưởng. Địa điểm học tập là ở Tòa Nhà Ban Tuyên Giáo Q3 Nguyễn Đình Chiểu. Đặc điểm của Thầy là profile rất nice, hay nói về đạo lý và nước hoa và khoe body của Thầy (dù nó béo và đầy lipit)2) Năm 2022, Thầy ấy kêu gọi mọi người mua NLG all in đến dưới 69 full margin TP80, sau đó nó sập về 30, à, thế là cháy mất rồi. Sau đó Thầy bảo là chỉ chịu trách nhiệm hết t+3 thôi. Sau đó Thầy bảo là do xui, ra tin bắt anh Quyết thì phải chạy chứ. Thầy call ITA full margin sau đó Chị Yến bắt.3) Sau đó Thầy call PDR từ 15 nó sập về 10 sau khi nó hồi lên 14, Thầy bảo có thể còn biến số nên giảm vị thế đi, thế là nó lên 30. Thầy gáy nhân 3 nhưng hàng không biết Thầy còn cầm không4) 9 tháng trước, Thầy phân tích rất kỹ càng rồi call học viên mua AGG giá 28, giá sau đó lên 36 thì bị đạp, nhưng đạp thì Thầy vẫn bảo mọi người giữ, giữ đến 24 Thầy hỏi còn margin cho Thầy mua không và giờ nó đang có giá 21-22. Thầy phân tích AGG rất kỹ, kỹ tới nỗi Market tăng 250 điểm, BDS tăng 20 30% thì AGG từ 36 về 20. 5) Chuyện sẽ chẳng là gì nếu- Thầy bảo do xui nhưng bản chất Thầy call học viên mua cho quỹ xả, lần 2 Thầy call cho Thầy xả- Thầy bảo Quỹ Nhật vào mua AGG, Thầy nói The Sóng book lợi nhuận nhưng thì ra Thầy book lợi nhuận trên đầu con dân- Chuyện xảy ra Thầy bảo là do bạn học viên call chứ Thầy không call. Bằng bùa lợi Satire/Parody mang trên người Thầy có quyền nói mọi thứ chỉ là chế giễu thôi.- Năm 2023, Thầy call short Bank, Bank tăng, Thầy chê BTC nhưng không dám bet kèo 30 BTC cho ETF được duyệt khi có người thách.- Thầy bảo lớp được xem full danh mục, báo trước, khi có cức mà Thầy cho xem, mà chắc gì là tài khoản của Thầy hay Thầy bảo skin in the game nhưng ai biết là bỏ 500 đồng hay 500 đô. Mình viết bài này ra đây là để mọi người cẩn thận với Thầy, à mà nghe đồn Thầy từng bị trường R đuổi vì không đạt KPI, Thầy làm trái phiếu thì sai pháp lý phải làm lại, Thầy lấy profile 1 trường bên NZ nhưng chỉ là profile liên kết, chứ Thầy làm gì có bằng PhD để trường M bên NZ tuyển chính thức. À trung thâm của Thầy lùa đủ thứ, lùa quản lý tài sản, lùa CFA dù chả khác gì sách nói, lùa MA dù Thầy toàn chém gió lại.Mọi người copy share thoải mái, để người ta không còn bị lùa và để cho người ta thấy uy tín của Thầy như cái chart AGG vậy đó: Cấm thủng lòng đất

      Tai Tran?

    1. Complaint

      OCLC Online Computer Library Center, Inc. v. Anna's Archive (2:24-cv-00144)

      District Court, Southern District of Ohio

    1. Read [[Martha S. Jones]] in Sleuthing the Card Catalog

    2. The Library of Congress discontinued the use of “Negroes” as a subject heading in 1976.
    3. I fingered my way through where I thought I’d find entries: African American, Afro-American, Black. Nothing there. I had to then brainstorm like it was 1999, or was it 1989, 1979, or even earlier, to discover the right term. As far back as 1984, the Library of Congress, whose subject headings most research libraries in the United States utilize, admitted that it was “frustrating” to search for Black people in its catalog because two terms were simultaneously in use: “Afro-Americans” and “Blacks.”1 Neither term made it into the old Peabody Library catalog, so perhaps it and the terminology it reflected dated from an even earlier time.

      Research on keywords and their shifting meanings over time can make things difficult for the novice researcher. This example from Martha S. Jones certainly highlights this perspective even in under a century of semantic shift.

    1. https://www.ebay.com/itm/374936561744

      Previously listed (late Summer 2023). Offered for bidding at $7,200 for a Jens Risom Library Card catalog on/around 2023-09-16. Local pickup from Pageland, SC. Ex-library from Davidson College Library in North Carolina tag number 01359.

      Section of 6x5 and another of 6x7 for a total of 72 drawers with a middle section which has two pull out writing drawers.

      Cost per drawer at opening bid: $100.00

      2023-09-25: Relisted at https://www.ebay.com/itm/374948492633

      2024-02-29 Relisted at https://www.ebay.com/itm/375282966486

  6. Feb 2024
    1. Only the largepelican, squatting in the trees, can break the connection, a symbol ofbad audience, staring insolently, resolutely offstage. But she is beinggradually struck out, her colours fading as the original red and giltborders reassert themselves reprimandingly from beneath, themanuscript exacting a slow punishment for the sin of inattention.

      Dennis Duncan completely misreads this image of Grosseteste and the Pelican which appears in the Lambeth Palace Library's MS 522 of The Castle of love. (for image see: https://hypothes.is/a/RzHLjsz8Ee6dZLOTV5h65Q)

      Duncan identifies Grosseteste's pose with his hand raised and his index finger extended as "the classic gesture of the storyteller." In fact, the bishop is pointing directly up at the pelican which sits just on top of the frame of the illuminated scene. This pelican is elevated above and just beyond the scene of the image because it represents, as was common in the time period, the suffering of Christ.

      Bestiaries of the age commonly depicted the "pelican in her piety" which was noted by Isidore of Seville in his Etymologies (Book 12, 7:26) from the 7th century, a text which heavily influenced many of these bestiaries. It was also thought at the time that the insatiable and rapacious pelican ate lizards and crocodiles (or lived off of them); as these were associated with snakes and by way of the story of the Garden of Eden the devil, they were also further associated with Christ and driving sin out of the world.

      Thus the image is more appropriately read in its original context as Grosseteste giving a sermon about the suffering of Christ who is represented by a pelican floating above the scene being depicted.

      see: https://hypothes.is/a/QAc8us24Ee6d1kPcrhQPyw

    1. Robert Grosseteste, Bishop of Lincoln (face rubbed), in mitre and red cope, with crosier, seated on left speaks to a seated group of five people, mostly women. Tree on right; large bird with long beak at top.

      image of MS 522 f1r Lambeth Palace Library

      Folio 1 of MS 522 of Château d'amour

      Close up of inset image via link close up of image on folio 1r of Château d'amour

      Book and images mentioned in Chapter 2 of @Duncan2022 Index, A History of the

    1. Read [[Martha S. Jones]] in A New Face for an Old Library Catalog

      Discussion on harmful content in library card catalogs and finding aids.

      The methods used to describe archive material can not only be harmful to those using them, but they also provide a useful historical record of what cataloguers may have been thinking contemporaneously as they classified and organized materials.

      This is another potentially useful set of information to have while reading into historical topics from library card catalogs compared to modern-day digital methods.

      Is anyone using version control on their catalogs?

    1. but they left their own belovedmanuscript unclassied and undescribed, and thus it never attainedthe status of a holding, which it so obviously deserved, and wasinstead tacitly understood to be merely a “nding aid,” a piece offurniture, wholly vulnerable to passing predators, subject tojanitorial, rather than curatorial, jurisdiction—even though thiscatalog was, in truth, the one holding that people who entered thebuilding would be likely to have in common, to know how to usefrom childhood, even to love. A new administrator came by onemorning and noticed that there was some old furniture taking upspace that could be devoted to bound volumes of Technicalities, TheElectronic Library, and the Journal of Library Automation. The cardcatalog, for want of having been cataloged itself, was thrown into adumpster.
    2. The authors made one serious mistake, however. Although theyhad taken great pains to be sure that within their massive workevery book and manuscript stored in their building was representedby a three-by-ve page, and often by several pages, describing it,they had forgotten to devote any page, anywhere, to the very book

      that they had themselves been writing all those years.

      Baker describes the library card catalog as a massive book made up of 3 x 5 inch pages describing all the other books. Sadly he laments, they never bothered to catalog this meta-book itself.

    3. Together, over the years, they achieved what one of their earlymasters, Charles Ammi Cutter, called a “syndetic” structure—that is,a system of referential links—of remarkable coherency andresolution.

      reference for this?


      definition: syndetic structure is one of coherency and resolution made up by referential links.

      Why is no one using this word in the zettelkasten space?


      The adjective "syndetic" means "serving to connect" or "to be connected by a conjunction". (A conjunction being a word used to connect words, phrases and clauses, for example: and, but, if). The antonym is "asyndetic" (connections made without conjoins)

    4. By the early seventies, therewas an ominous arrearage of uncataloged material waiting on herdsof rolling carts near the overtaxed cataloging departments of mostlarge libraries. Cataloging had reached a state of crisis
    5. SUNY Brockport’s Drake Memorial Library greets its userswith a typographically generated image of a card catalog:Your automated catalog, by DYNIX.Copyright (c) 1992 by DYNIX, Incorporated.

      A library card catalog drawn using ASCII art. :)

    6. Thus, the New York Public Library has CATNYP.There is BEARCAT (Kutztown University) and ALLECAT (Allegheny) andBOBCAT (NYU’s Bobst Library) and CATS (Cambridge). There is VIRGO(the University of Virginia), FRANCIS (Williams College), LUCY(Skidmore), CLIO (Columbia), CHESTER (the University of Rochester),SHERLOCK (Bualo State College), ARLO (the University of Colorado atColorado Springs), FRANKLIN (the University of Pennsylvania), andHarvard’s appropriately Eustace Tilleyish HOLLIS. There is BISON(SUNY Bualo), OASIS (the University of Iowa), ORION (UCLA),SOCRATES (Stanford), ILIAD (Butler), EUCLIDPLUS (Case Western), LUMINA(the University of Minnesota), and THE CONNELLY EXPLORER (La Salle).MELVYL (the University of California system) is named after MelvilDewey; the misspelling was reportedly intentional, meant toemphasize the dierence between Dewey’s cataloging universe andour own.

      List of names for computerized library card catalogs at various libraries.

    7. , one of the reasons that the New York Public Library had toclose its public catalog was that the public was destroying it. TheHetty Green cards disappeared. Someone calling himself Cosmoswas periodically making o with all the cards for Mein Kampf. Cardsfor two Dante manuscripts were stolen: not the manuscripts, thecards for the manuscripts.
    8. book at a public phone rather than bothering to copy down anaddress and a phone number, library visitors—the heedless, thecrazy—have, especially since the late eighties, been increasinglycapable of tearing out the card referring to a book they want.

      The huge frozen card catalog of the Library of Congress currently suers from alarming levels of public trauma: like the movie trope in which the private eye tears a page from a phone

    9. Radical students destroyed roughly ahundred thousand cards from the catalog at the University of Illinoisin the sixties. Berkeley’s library sta was told to keep watch overthe university’s card catalogs during the antiwar turmoil there.Someone reportedly poured ink on the Henry Cabot Lodge cards atStanford
    10. They donot grow mold, as the card catalog of the Engineering Library of theUniversity of Toronto once did, following water damage.
    11. obody canexpect a library to maintain sequences of alphabetized cardboard fora collection that is growing, as some currently are, at a rate of vehundred items a day.

      In 1994, some libraries were acquiring material at the rate of five hundred items per day. Rates like this made it difficult for catalogers to keep up with uncatalogued material going back to the 1970s for some institutions.

    12. “Atthe end of this project,” Dale Flecker told me, “there won’t be cardcatalogs left in the university.” I asked him if there were any cardcatalogs, anywhere in the world, that he thought worthy ofpreservation. “In general, they’re being discarded,” he said. “I’m notsure I know of anybody who’s decided to preserve them as physicalobjects.” Maureen Finn said much the same thing to me: “Theinstitutions still want the cards back, and then I think they’re storingthem. But most library managers that I talk to will say, ‘We arestoring them because it makes the sta feel good, and we will begetting rid of them.’ ”

      Interesting psychology being played out here....

    13. And some undetermined but large fraction of thetotality is being sent to an artist named Thomas Johnston, atWestern Washington University.

      Card catalog cards being repurposed for art.

    14. “Library hand” was a special kind ofbackward-slanting penmanship meant specically for card catalogs,and taught in library school through the 1920s.
    15. OCLC owns the largestdatabase of bibliographic information in the world, and it oers aservice called RETROCON, contracting with libraries to transfer oldcatalog cards to “machine-readable form,” at anywhere from ftycents to six dollars per card.
    16. An image of the front of every card for Widener thus now exists onmicroche, available to users in a room o the lobby. (Anyinformation on the backs of the cards—and many notes do carryover—was not photographed
    17. theMaryland Health Sciences Library published a commemorativechapbook called 101 Uses for a Dead Catalog Card.
    18. At Cosumnes River College, in California, the card catalog wasceremonially put out of its misery by an ocial who pointed a gunat it and “shot” it. D

      Wow!

    19. The cards datingfrom 1911 to 1975 at the New York State Library in Albany (whereMelvil Dewey was librarian from 1889 to 1906) were thrown awaylast month as a consequence of a historical-preservation projectinvolving the building in which they were stored.

      Sad that a "historical-preservation project" resulted in the loss of such an interesting historical artifact.

    20. The New York Public Library, ahead of the game, renovated theentire ten-million-card catalog of its Research Libraries between1977 and 1980, microlmed it, and threw it out.
    21. universities and public libraries have completed the“retrospective conversions” of their catalogs to computer databases(frequently with the help of federal Title II-C money, as part of the“Strengthening Research Library Resources” program),
    22. cards printed by theLibrary of Congress, Baker & Taylor, and OCLC;

      In the 21st century, many library card catalog cards were commercially printed by OCLC, Baker & Taylor, and the Library of Congress

    23. Chancellor Edward N. Brandt, Jr., wearing ared T-shirt that said “The Great Discard,” chose a drawer of thecatalog and pulled it from the cabinet. With the help of a beamingCyril Feng, who was then the director of the library, he drew theretaining rod from the chosen drawer and let its several hundredcards ceremonially spill into a trash can decorated with coloredpaper.

      The intellectual historian in me: 😱

    1. Curtis mentioned one example of information that he found: “One of the first drawers of the author-title catalog I looked through held a card for Benjamin Smith Barton’s ‘Elements of Botany’ [the 1804 edition]. The card indicated that UVA’s copy of this book was signed by Joseph C. Cabell, who was instrumental in the founding of the University.”Curtis checked to see if the Virgo entry included this detail, but he found no record of the book at all. “I thought perhaps that was because the book had been lost, and the Virgo entry deleted, but just in case, I emailed David Whitesell [curator in the Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library] and asked him if this signed copy of Barton’s ‘Elements of Botany’ was on the shelves over there. Indeed it was.

      Digitization efforts in card collections may result in the loss or damage of cards or loss of the materials which the original cards represented in the case of library card catalogs.

    2. The information neatly typed on the cards – which library workers sometimes supplemented with handwritten notes on front and back – includes details that in many cases are not typically part of the electronic catalog system, Virgo, that the University Library switched to in 1989. At the time, the catalog was transferred by scanning that captured only the front of the cards.

      Libraries may have handwritten notes on the back of library card catalog cards in the 20th century, a practice which caused data loss in the case of the Alderman Library which only scanned the front of their cards in 1989 when they made the switch from physical cards to a digital catalog.

    3. Created over a 50-year span from 1939 to 1989, that catalog grew to about 4 million cards in 65 cabinets with 4,000 drawers.

      This is roughly 65 cabinets of 60 drawers each.

      4 million cards over 50 years is approximately 220 cards per day. This isn't directly analogous to my general statistics on number of notes per day for individual people's excerpting practice, but it does give an interesting benchmark for a larger institution and their acquisitions over 50 years. (Be sure to divide by 3 for duplication over author/title/subject overlap, which would be closer to 73 per day)

      Shifted from analog cards to digital version in 1989.

    1. Founded in 1956, Highsmith is a distributor of equipment, supplies, and furniture to public, academic, and school libraries.
    2. Library supply company Highsmith, headquartered in Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin, has been purchased by Lab Safety Supply, a direct-marketing subsidiary of Chicago-based facilities maintenance supplier W. W. Grainger. Terms of the acquisition, announced in the business press July 10, were not disclosed. Highsmith’s operations, with anticipated sales for 2008 in the range of $20–$30 million, will be integrated with LSS by the end of the year.

      Purchased July 2008.

    1. The smallest collection of card catalogs is near the librarian’s information desk in the Social Science/Philosophy/Religion department on lower level three. It is rarely used and usually only by librarians. It contains hundreds of cards that reflect some of the most commonly asked questions of the department librarians. Most of the departments on the lower levels have similar small collections. Card catalog behind the reference desk on lower level three, photo credit: Tina Lernø

    2. The surname Index for the library’s genealogy includes 315 drawers of about 750 cards each for a total of more than 236,250 cards patrons can use when they visit the History/Map/Travel section, photo credit: Diana Rosen

    3. The delight-inducing art piece, A Place for Everything and Everything in its Place, is featured in the two elevator cars on the north side of the building, accessible in the Tom Bradley Wing.One car has cards for the "Comprehensive" and the other for the "Complete" works of various authors and topics. When moving, the elevator cars expose cards in the shaft window that reflect books that are found on the floor the elevator is passing.Artist David Bunn was given nearly 2 million catalog cards to play with for his art installation, yet he only used a little more than 9,500 in the two elevator cars. He has, since the early 1990s, been creating art projects, found poetry, and sculptures with the remaining cards.
    1. There was a high number of librarians among the Americans, such asCharles Ammi Cutter of Harvard and the Boston Athenæum (who producedAmerica’s first public library card catalogue).
    1. sample catalog card included in a Gaylord Brothers supply catalog.

      Gaylord Bros. sold several types of card catalog cards including:

      • No. 301 medium weight
      • No. 306 with red rules (classical three lines)
      • No. 307 with blue rules
      • No. 311 pain card

      all were predrilled with holes

      via https://www.libraryhistorybuff.org/catalog-cards.htm

  7. Jan 2024
    1. https://www.ebay.com/itm/325982715454

      35 drawer modular card catalog in light mid century modern design. Table with stick legs a 5x6 section including two pull out writing drawers, a 5x1 section and a top. Likely maple, in great shape. All wood and metal, includes all rods.

      Listed in 2024-01-29 for $3995.00 with freight shipping extra from South Bend, IN

      Labeled as a Centura 400 (model?)

      Cost per drawer: $114.00

      This is the first time I've seen a catalog from Sjöström on the market though on searching there are a handful floating around.

    1. https://www.ebay.com/itm/305374515970

      12 drawer (3 x 4) card index from Library Bureau in generally good looking shape from January 2024-01-28 listed for $385.00 (+ a ridiculous $203.77 shipping fee from North Canton, OH to Los Angeles).

      Looks to be ex-library from Colgate University, in all wood and metal and in excellent shape. Missing all the catalog rods however.

      I'm doing the cost per drawer based only on the opening bid price despite the gouging of the shipping price. Many sellers seem to be tacking on an above average shipping charge to pad their sale prices and potentially shift commissions from ebay.

      Cost per drawer: $32.00

    1. The Charging This consists in its interior arrangement ofCabinet rows of pigeon-holes constructed on an inclineupwards so that the base of each horizontalrow of pigeon-holes is higher than its predecessor. Into thesepigeon-holes the charging shps are placed and there is a guidecard to each pigeon-hole marking the divisions of the charging slipsby giving the number of the slip which is to be filed immediatelybehind it.

      While slightly different in its physical configuration, the office charging cabinet (with a bleacher-like set up) is very similar to the similarly named library card charging tray.

      Which came first?

    1. Reply to @Denny @richnewman @patrickrhone at https://beardystarstuff.net/2024/01/16/i-finished-reading.html

      I started reading Parable of the Sower exactly one year to the date mentioned at the start of the book at the public library in Pasadena where she grew up. As a 49 year old father of a 12 year old daughter, it was a much more visceral and eerie experience than I could ever have expected. She has forever changed the perspective I have driving down the streets of our shared neighborhood.

      I'm not sure if they'll have open remote registrations for it or if it will only be broadcast locally, but the local Octavia Butler Book Club has an upcoming zoom session on Feb 24 which can be found in the Pasadena Public Library's newsletter (.pdf). It will feature Dr. Kendra Parker via Zoom from Georgia to present her lecture: "Walking a Mile in Her Shoes: Exploring Octavia Butler's Archives."

      The nearby Huntington Library houses her papers and some of her materials there may be accessible online.

    1. Instance methods Instances of Models are documents. Documents have many of their own built-in instance methods. We may also define our own custom document instance methods. // define a schema const animalSchema = new Schema({ name: String, type: String }, { // Assign a function to the "methods" object of our animalSchema through schema options. // By following this approach, there is no need to create a separate TS type to define the type of the instance functions. methods: { findSimilarTypes(cb) { return mongoose.model('Animal').find({ type: this.type }, cb); } } }); // Or, assign a function to the "methods" object of our animalSchema animalSchema.methods.findSimilarTypes = function(cb) { return mongoose.model('Animal').find({ type: this.type }, cb); }; Now all of our animal instances have a findSimilarTypes method available to them. const Animal = mongoose.model('Animal', animalSchema); const dog = new Animal({ type: 'dog' }); dog.findSimilarTypes((err, dogs) => { console.log(dogs); // woof }); Overwriting a default mongoose document method may lead to unpredictable results. See this for more details. The example above uses the Schema.methods object directly to save an instance method. You can also use the Schema.method() helper as described here. Do not declare methods using ES6 arrow functions (=>). Arrow functions explicitly prevent binding this, so your method will not have access to the document and the above examples will not work.

      Certainly! Let's break down the provided code snippets:

      1. What is it and why is it used?

      In Mongoose, a schema is a blueprint for defining the structure of documents within a collection. When you define a schema, you can also attach methods to it. These methods become instance methods, meaning they are available on the individual documents (instances) created from that schema.

      Instance methods are useful for encapsulating functionality related to a specific document or model instance. They allow you to define custom behavior that can be executed on a specific document. In the given example, the findSimilarTypes method is added to instances of the Animal model, making it easy to find other animals of the same type.

      2. Syntax:

      Using methods object directly in the schema options:

      javascript const animalSchema = new Schema( { name: String, type: String }, { methods: { findSimilarTypes(cb) { return mongoose.model('Animal').find({ type: this.type }, cb); } } } );

      Using methods object directly in the schema:

      javascript animalSchema.methods.findSimilarTypes = function(cb) { return mongoose.model('Animal').find({ type: this.type }, cb); };

      Using Schema.method() helper:

      javascript animalSchema.method('findSimilarTypes', function(cb) { return mongoose.model('Animal').find({ type: this.type }, cb); });

      3. Explanation in Simple Words with Examples:

      Why it's Used:

      Imagine you have a collection of animals in your database, and you want to find other animals of the same type. Instead of writing the same logic repeatedly, you can define a method that can be called on each animal instance to find similar types. This helps in keeping your code DRY (Don't Repeat Yourself) and makes it easier to maintain.

      Example:

      ```javascript const mongoose = require('mongoose'); const { Schema } = mongoose;

      // Define a schema with a custom instance method const animalSchema = new Schema({ name: String, type: String });

      // Add a custom instance method to find similar types animalSchema.methods.findSimilarTypes = function(cb) { return mongoose.model('Animal').find({ type: this.type }, cb); };

      // Create the Animal model using the schema const Animal = mongoose.model('Animal', animalSchema);

      // Create an instance of Animal const dog = new Animal({ type: 'dog', name: 'Buddy' });

      // Use the custom method to find similar types dog.findSimilarTypes((err, similarAnimals) => { console.log(similarAnimals); }); ```

      In this example, findSimilarTypes is a custom instance method added to the Animal schema. When you create an instance of the Animal model (e.g., a dog), you can then call findSimilarTypes on that instance to find other animals with the same type. The method uses the this.type property, which refers to the type of the current animal instance. This allows you to easily reuse the logic for finding similar types across different instances of the Animal model.

      Certainly! Let's go through each part and explain it in simple terms: ### 1. `this` in Mongoose: - **What is `this`?** In JavaScript, `this` refers to the current context or object. In Mongoose, particularly within methods and middleware functions, `this` represents the instance (document) the function is currently operating on. - **Why is it used?** `this` is used to access and modify the properties of the current document. For example, in a Mongoose method, `this` allows you to refer to the fields of the specific document the method is called on. ### 2. Example: Let's use the `userSchema.pre("save", ...)`, which is a Mongoose middleware, as an example: ```javascript userSchema.pre("save", async function (next) { if (!this.isModified("password")) { next(); } else { this.password = await bcrypt.hash(this.password, 10); next(); } }); ``` - **Explanation in Simple Words:** - Imagine you have a system where users can sign up and set their password. - Before saving a new user to the database, you want to ensure that the password is securely encrypted (hashed) using a library like `bcrypt`. - The `userSchema.pre("save", ...)` is a special function that runs automatically before saving a user to the database. - In this function: - `this.isModified("password")`: Checks if the password field of the current user has been changed. - If the password is not modified, it means the user is not updating their password, so it just moves on to the next operation (saving the user). - If the password is modified, it means a new password is set or the existing one is changed. In this case, it uses `bcrypt.hash` to encrypt (hash) the password before saving it to the database. - The use of `this` here is crucial because it allows you to refer to the specific user document that's being saved. It ensures that the correct password is hashed for the current user being processed. In summary, `this` in Mongoose is a way to refer to the current document or instance, and it's commonly used to access and modify the properties of that document, especially in middleware functions like the one demonstrated here for password encryption before saving to the database.

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  8. Dec 2023
    1. Your having said "Friends of the Library" makes me think that your set likely isn't actually ex-Library (reference or otherwise), but likely was privately owned and donated directly to the library or their friends, who then sold them to raise money for the library itself. This is a common pattern in libraries across America and explains how you've gotten such a pristine copy.

    1. https://www.ebay.com/itm/155791697888

      Offered for $1,292.00 for auction on 2023-09-24 with free local pick up from Bayonne, NJ. Modular, unlabeled Card catalog with standalone (non-interlocking) 5x3 set of drawers and a section with two pull out writing drawers.

      Cost per drawer: $86.13

      This has been listed separately in the past year, but taken off eBay for several months before this relisting. (versus being continually relisted...)

      2023-10-11: Relisted at https://www.ebay.com/itm/155822159839 for $1292.00

      2023-12-02: Relisted at https://www.ebay.com/itm/155923155812 for 1292.00

    1. Given the security implications of getting the implementation correct, we strongly encourage you to use OAuth 2.0 libraries when interacting with Google's OAuth 2.0 endpoints. It is a best practice to use well-debugged code provided by others, and it will help you protect yourself and your users. For more information, see Client libraries.
  9. Nov 2023
    1. In December 1998, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation awarded the Library of Congress a grant to support a two-year project to digitize the Hannah Arendt Papers manuscript collection. The staff of the Manuscript Division at the Library administered the project, with assistance from the National Digital Library Program (NDLP) and in cooperation with the New School University in New York City.
    2. The collection was digitized in 1998-2000 through the generous support of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Initially, some digital content was limited to onsite access through dedicated work stations available only at the Library of Congress, The New School in New York City, and the Hannah Arendt Center at the University of Oldenburg, Germany. This updated digital presentation of the Hannah Arendt Papers at the Library of Congress is now available publicly online in its entirety.
    1. If you want to give your site members access to your Content Libraries, you can use the Libraries component, which is available in templates such as Customer Service, Build Your Own (Aura), Partner Central, and Customer Account Portal. Once the component is added, site members can view and open the libraries they have access to, either in a list view or a tile view.

      I've been exploring Salesforce Experience Cloud recently, and it's great to know that I can easily grant site members access to our Content Libraries using the Libraries component. This feature makes it easier to access the resources they need.

  10. Oct 2023
    1. ArtistWorks provides world-class instruction for the most popular string and band instruments through self-paced video lessons from professional musicians.

      Under "Extras" in the Libby app: https://libbyapp.com

    1. https://www.ebay.com/itm/385498338372

      30 drawer card catalog in 2 parts with two writing drawers in the middle and a matching table stand. In mediocre shape and has two replaced drawers (metal and/or plastic, not wood). Drawers are maed in all wood

      Listed at $1,5000 for over 3 months. $50 per drawer.

      2023-10-12: Still listed for sale. Local pick up only from Brentwood, CA

      cost per drawer: $50

    1. Father emptied a card le for Margot and me and lled it withindex cards that are blank on one side. This is to become ourreading le, in which Margot and I are supposed to note down thebooks we’ve read, the author and the date. I’ve learned two newwords: “brothel” and “coquette.” I’ve bought a separate notebookfor new words.

      —Anne Frank (1929-1945), diary entry dated Saturday, February 27, 1943 (age 13)

      Anne Frank was given an empty card file by her father who filled it with index cards that were blank on one side. They were intended to use it as a "reading file" in which she and Margot were "supposed to note down the books we've read, the author and the date."


      In the same entry she mentioned that she'd bought a separate notebook for writing down new words she encountered. Recent words she mentions encountering were "brothel" and "coquette".

    1. https://www.ebay.com/itm/155811111944

      2023-10-05 72 drawer library card catalog listed for sale at $850.00 with local pick up only from Mechanicsville, VA. No brand name listed. Plastic drawers with wooden fronts. Two sections of 6x6 drawers separated by a section with three writing drawers. Appears to be a solid piece with a solid base. In generally good condition.

      cost per drawer: $11.80

      Not a bad deal here, esp. if you're local.

    1. https://www.ebay.com/itm/166354962733

      Library Bureau library card catalog with what looks like two 5x5, and two 5x6 sections, one section of five pull out writing desks, and a top making up 110 drawers.

      In rough but serviceable shape, has a few fittings issues and some of the finish is in tough shape along with some wood pieces gouged out. Looks to be all oak (including internals of drawers aside from usual drawer pulls and rods, almost all of which are present.

      Listed on 2023-09-30 for $3,000 for free local pick up from Merced, CA.

      Cost per drawer: $27.27

      2023-10-03: Seller made me an offer to purchase for $2,500.

    1. https://www.ebay.com/itm/126117193513

      Library card catalog section listed for $329.00. Single section of 5x1 with 10 drawers. It's had pieces of material stapled on the top/bottom to cover up the stacking holes. Missing card rods. Drawer internals appear to be plastic (70s or later), rods removed and replaced with carpet/material to cover up holes. For free local pick up in Sacramento, CA.

      Most likely a Gaylord Bros., but not labeled.

      cost per drawer: $32.90

  11. Sep 2023
    1. https://www.ebay.com/itm/275465128542

      Saw for sale on/around 2023-05-17 for $3,000, though willing to accept $2,500 (or lower). Still on offer 2023-09-24.

      Gaylord Bros. 5 piece sectional library card catalog with two 5x3 sections of drawers, a pull out writing desk (with two pull outs), a top and a base table.

      cost per drawer: $100

    1. https://www.ebay.com/itm/335030637598 (The card catalog here appears to be late 1970s/ early 80s and looks dreadful)

      Free standing low table unit with no legs and a single 5x3 section offered in September 2023 for opening bid of $600 and a buy now price of $785.00 with free local pick up in Eugene, OR.

      2023-09-22: Relisting https://www.ebay.com/itm/335040502888

      Cost per drawer: $40 (bid); 52.33 (purchase)


      In the mid to late 1900s, the Buckstaff Company manufactured wooden library card catalogs.

      They still make library carrels and other related furniture, though they no longer appear to make card catalogs.

      See also: http://www.buckstaff.com/index.html

    1. https://offerup.com/item/detail/aa30b5cf-993e-3077-9c86-5b36b7d7fee9?q=library+card+catalog

      Offered circa July 2023 for $200 and sold circa September 2023.

      Gaylord brothers three piece modular library card catalog circa 1950's. Acquired by seller prior to a school demolition. Top cover appears to be homemade and covered with cloth. Other pieces are standard 5x3 grouping of 15 drawers and lower table unit. Missing all the catalog rods.

      cost per drawer: $13.30

    1. In 1896, they invented a simple mending tape to fix torn currency, but it soon became a hit with librarians for mending books. Gaylord Bros. became a purveyor of supplies to libraries across the country.
    1. https://www.ebay.com/itm/195819504280

      Brodart 72 drawer library card catalog offered for sale for $1995.00 in at least mid 2023 if not earlier. Local pick up from Twin Lake, MI. A bit beat up. Appears to be maybe late 60s/early 70s. Has plastic drawers.

      Two sections of 6x6 separated by three pull out writing desks.

      Cost per drawer. $27.70

    1. https://www.ebay.com/itm/225779061741

      Listed on 2023-09-17 for starting bid of $600 with a purchase price of $795.00. With $100 shipping to Los Angeles from Bartow, FL.<br /> In excellent looking condition. Restored?<br /> two drawers, but each one has two rows of cards, so technically four drawers.

      Missing card catalog rods, so likely used for something other than cards at one point.

      Cost per drawer: $150 per "drawer" at the opening bid price.

    1. Market analysis of library card catalogs in 2023.

      As card catalogs lost their functionality in libraries and were de-acquisitioned there was a wave of nostalgia which caused people to purchase them, often in auctions, at higher than expected prices. Once they had them, most of these purchasers realized that they didn't have functional uses in their homes for them (beyond wine or liquor bottle storage, small crafts, or use as a zettelkasten, which seem to be the only reasonable upcycling use cases I've seen and the last seems to be very rare and niche). They sit and take up space for very little value in return beyond some esthetic beauty and nostalgia. As a result many soured on their ownership. Most owners naturally want to recoup their original purchase price thinking that relative rarity will save them.

      Combined with this there was a resurgence in mid-century design esthetic which had some furniture restorers and designers buying and doing full (and very pretty) expensive restorations of older 20s - 40s versions which sold at auctions for $4,500 and up. Given the rarity of some of these older, fine furniture versions along with the work in restoration and the limited market only those who had a tinge of nostalgia and money to burn made purchases which resulted in a limited number of actual sales.

      These two factors mean that almost all of the listings for library card catalogs are heavily overvalued on eBay, Facebook Marketplace, Craig's List, Etsy, etc. The fine furniture restorations have set an artificially high price point which some feel theirs must match as well. The difference in quality however is stark. Because of their size and lack of functionality, there is a relative glut of them on the market which all bear inflated prices. Those who originally spent inordinate amounts for them, feel they will still have that same value to others, so they list them online for inflated prices.

      I've been closely watching the online "market" for them for over a year and see the same several dozen or more listed across the country usually in the range of about $30-$60 per drawer. Many are listed as local pick up only, which further hampers the overall market. This also brings up the issue of shipping a 60 drawer card catalog which can easily run in the $800-$1,500+ range which usually requires additional shipping logistics involved with freight. Most catalogs are already overpriced, but adding an additional $1000 tax on top is a bridge too far for all but the highest end of the market. Some platforms like Etsy and eBay which take cuts of the final sale also add to the cost of the sale.

      In the year and a half or more that I've been watching, I've only seen a handful of actual sales, all of which were local, and many of which were in the Los Angeles area. All of these sales have been for listings which eventually were reduced down to the $15 per drawer range. One local sale was in Wisconsin was for $10 per drawer (a 30 drawer file) and another in Los Angeles was for $12.50 per drawer (on a 20 drawer file).

      A note on condition

      Outside of a small handful of fine furniture listings in the $4,000+ range, most ex-Library card catalogs are generally very well worn and not in great condition which makes them less valuable as decoration pieces. In fact, many are often missing their original card catalog rods, have dents, dings, or other cosmetic issues. Some are missing drawers or have replacement drawers which don't match. Some may be slightly mismatched having been purchased in different eras as modular pieces and put together. Frequently they have been modified from their original states to include inserts or other material to fill in the holes which where almost standard in the bottoms of the drawers.

      Advice

      If you're in the market, know that it is tremendously inflated, a fact which most sellers are aware of as they've got them listed, some for many years, not resulting in actual sales. If you really want one and find it in a reasonable condition, I highly recommend making an offer for it at about $10 per drawer and potentially go up to $15. Anything higher than that is overpaying based on actual recent market conditions. If you have the money to burn, feel free, but keep in mind that like many others in the past, once the initial nostalgia has passed, you've probably got a large piece of relatively non-functional furniture in your home.

      It's not common, but some government auction sites will list card catalogs for auction from time to time. Because they actively want to sell them these can be purchased in the $2-10 per drawer range or less. Often they tend toward the larger 60+ drawer range, aren't in good condition, or need to be picked up and shipped to your final destination, usually within a few days of purchase as the original owners don't or explicitly won't handle shipping. These are likely to need some restoration work to be decorative pieces in many homes.

      If you want something brand new, you can check out Brodart, which is the only remaining card catalog manufacturer/sales firm I'm aware of in the United States. Their systems are modular, so you can pick and choose what you'd like to have. The only caveat is that they start at $1,700 for their smallest 9 drawer model and can go up to $11,648 (plus shipping) for a full 60 drawer model. The other potential drawback, for some, is that they are made of a mixture of wood, metal and plastic versus the all wood and metal fittings of older vintage models.

      If you're in the market primarily for nostalgic reasons, then you might also consider looking at some of the older desktop wooden card catalogs which are often much less expensive, take up far less space, and can be wonderfully decorative. Some of the smaller two to six drawer desktop models have the benefit of potentially serving as recipe boxes or paper rolodexes, zettelkasten, or simply small office storage. Here again, the online markets are likely to be heavily overpriced with 2 drawer models being continually listed at $150 and 4 drawer models in the $250-400 range. These sellers know that these prices don't result in actual sales as they've been sitting on them for long periods of time (presumably hoping to get lucky). Here I'd recommend you make offers in the $20-30 per drawer range to see what you can find. Another benefit is that these smaller models are far cheaper to ship across the country. For additional advice on these, see: The Ultimate Guide to Zettelkasten Index Card Storage.

    1. https://www.facebook.com/marketplace/item/271076511951674/

      Appears to be a single piece with two sections of 6x5 drawers for a total of 60 separated by three drawer pulls. In excellent shape, but missing many rods.

      $18.33 per drawer

      Listed in Mid-May 2023 for $1,100 in La Palma, CA

    1. "Surrendering" by Ocean Vuong

      1. He moved into United State when he was age of five. He first came to United State when he started kindergarten. Seven of them live in the apartment one bedroom and bathroom to share the whole. He learned ABC song and alphabet. He knows the ABC that he forgot the letter is M comes before N.

      2. He went to the library since he was on the recess. He was in the library hiding from the bully. The bully just came in the library doing the slight frame and soft voice in front of the kid where he sit. He left the library, he walked to the middle of the schoolyard started calling him the pansy and fairy. He knows the American flag that he recognize on the microphone against the backdrop.

    1. As I’d mentioned, the problem is not with the first printing, when our usual press run ranges from 7,000 to 15,000 copies, but with subsequent printings of a many of our titles. In many cases, a few years after a title’s initial publication, a three- to five-year supply can be as low as 500 copies. The cost to set up the book (called “make-ready” in the industry) is so high that the printing/binding cost per book is far more than most readers would be willing to pay. To “break even” on some of these titles, we’d have to charge $100 or more in bookstores, which would decrease sales even further. As it is, we subsidize those volumes with donations and with sales of other books.

      https://www.librarything.com/topic/286378

      LOAs first print runs are in the 7,000 - 15,000 copy range. Often after initial publication the stock for a 3-5 year supply is about 500 copies.

    1. Each Everyman's Library book has a colored cloth binding denoting the period of the work: Scarlet - Contemporary Classics Navy - 20th Century Burgundy - Victorian Literature/19th Century Dark Green - Pre-Victorian/Romantic/18th Century Light Blue - 17th Century and Earlier Celadon Green - Non-Western Classics Mauve - Ancient Classics Sand - Poetry The above information relating to the colored cloth binding of Everyman's Library books is 100% resourced from Random House’s Everyman’s Library page, found immediately below:http://www.randomhouse.com/knopf/classics/about.htm
    1. DCloyceSmithEdited: Mar 23, 2010, 12:22 pm It's a closely held secret: There is in fact no scheme to the color scheme. I can't speak for my predecessors, but I've "chosen" the colors for the last ten years, and the primary considerations have been (1) break up the colors for contiguous authors/titles when the volumes are alphabetized on the shelf (and try to keep additional tan volumes away from all those Henry James volumes), and (2) balance the collection as a whole. A couple of times, an author's son or daughter has specifically requested a cloth color, and of course I'll accommodate their decision. (And sometimes, the colors do pick themselves, like green cloth for the American Earth volume.)For the record, here are the color breakdowns through the Emerson volumes (not including the Twain Anthology and the Lincoln Anthology, when we used unique colors):Red -- 52 Blue -- 51 Green -- 48 Tan -- 50 (counting the Franklin as 2 volumes)David

      https://www.librarything.com/topic/87541

      No real rhyme or reason for Library of America book covers.

  12. Aug 2023
    1. https://alexandrianpl.org/comfort-cabinet/

      A library has repurposed their library card catalogs as a comfort cabinet to provide their community with necessities like toothbrushes, combs, band aids, socks, etc.

    1. I make a file named: app/models/active_storage/attachment.rb. Because it's in your project it takes loading precedence over the Gem version. Then inside we load the Gem version, and then monkeypatch it using class_eval: active_storage_gem_path = Gem::Specification.find_by_name('activestorage').gem_dir require "#{active_storage_gem_path}/app/models/active_storage/attachment" ActiveStorage::Attachment.class_eval do acts_as_taggable on: :tags end The slightly nasty part is locating the original file, since we can't find it normally because our new file takes precedence. This is not necessary in production, so you could put a if Rails.env.production? around it if you like I think.
    1. the Deformed Humanities shares affinities with Ian Bogost’s notion of carpentry, the practice of making philosophical and scholarly inquiries by constructing artifacts rather than writing words.

      related: Library carpentries

  13. Jul 2023
    1. https://www.facebook.com/marketplace/item/267138849330608/?ref=search&referral_code=null&referral_story_type=post&tracking=browse_serp%3Ac002e23e-c5a5-4234-bde1-736359c183b7

      $1,200 for 60 drawer library card catalog in wood. No brand listed. $20/drawer.

      Sold, but for unknown amount in July 2023.

      looked like a single piece though may have been two sections of 6 x 5 with a three pull writing section on a small pedestal and a top.