15 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2019
  2. Jan 2019
    1. esearchershave discovered that it takes about 45 minutes to craft a single bead; to make 10,000 suchbeads totals 7,500 hours of work, or three years of labor by skilled craftspeople

      Cf. Le Guin's discussion of gatherers and labor/leisure time

  3. Oct 2018
  4. May 2018
    1. Ce que l'on remarque cependant est que ceux qui sont vraiment habiletés à utiliser l'ordinateur réussissent mieux, même sans correcteur, tout simplement parce qu'ils gagnent presque 40 minutes sur un examen qui en dure 195 parce qu'ils n'ont pas à retranscrire leur brouillon au propre. Personne ne soulève cet avantage indu dont bénéficient actuellement des élèves de certaines écoles où l'on exige l'achat d'un appareil électronique ou bien où l'on fournit ce dernier.

      Test annotation dans Hypothes.is

  5. Nov 2017
    1. the secular spiritual transformation that comes from single-mindedness. When someone’s striving for a cherished goal becomes a life-mission, be it mastering a musical instrument or fine art, or putting heart and soul into building a business, or putting a public policy in place (a new drunk-driving ban or universal health care) they often come to embody their goal. “He is his company.” “She has become her music” (“and she writes the songs”).  Certainly in religion this is what is meant by terming someone holy or a living saint. This is also the secular goal of Confucian practice, to make li (behavioral ritual) yi (character). One accomplishes this transformation by complete and intense concentration of thoughts and behavior, and by “letting go” of one’s self-awareness or ego in the task. The work takes over and one becomes “possessed” by it, either in an uplifting way, or as in the need for exorcism, rehab, or at least “intervention” by friends and family. When morality sets the goal and means here, we term their culmination “moral exemplarism.”
  6. Nov 2016
    1. En el plano internacional, la incertidumbre sería absoluta, lo único que se podría esperar sería que los asesores presidenciales le disuadiesen de tomar decisiones impulsivas, como iniciar una guerra comercial con China o cambiar alianzas estratégicas que desembocasen en un acercamiento a la Rusia de Putin y un alejamiento de sus aliados tradicionales y las políticas de la OTAN.
  7. Jul 2016
    1. Dù không còn ai để tin, vẫn sẽ tin vào AI và tâm lý học Psyc ít nhất là cái mình có thể thử nghiệm hàng ngày! AI trong cuộc sống có lẽ giờ khoa học dữ liệu vẫn là phổ biến nhất nhưng nếu theo khoa học dữ liệu bây giờ, mình sẽ xa rời mục tiêu đầu tiên: xe tự hành. Có nên theo một thứ không biết bao giờ mới có, có thể chả bảo giờ, mà theo một thứ khác có thể làm ngay bây giờ, mà vẫn có liên quan

    2. Dù sao Trí tuệ Nhân tạo vẫn là cái mình có thể tin dù tất cả mọi thứ fall down, tear broken, mình vẫn sẽ theo nó tới cùng. Vì nó là thứ duy nhất dạy mình cách sống sao cho hiệu quả, dễ dẫn tới thành công nhất tâm lý học dạy mình cách sống tốt, có ý nghĩa, hạnh phúc nhất cần kết hợp cả 2 cái này để đạt được cả thành công lẫn hạnh phúc

  8. Aug 2014
    1. INTERVIEWER On the subject of being a woman writer in a man’s world, you’ve mentioned A Room of One’s Own as a touchstone. LE GUIN My mother gave it to me. It is an important book for a mother to give a daughter. She gave me A Room of One’s Own and Three Guineas when I was a teenager. So she corrupted me thoroughly, bless her heart. Though you know, in the 1950s, A Room of One’s Own was kind of tough going. Writing was something that men set the rules for, and I had never questioned that. The women who questioned those rules were too revolutionary for me even to know about them. So I fit myself into the man’s world of writing and wrote like a man, presenting only the male point of view. My early books are all set in a man’s world.
    2. So I put myself through a sort of course, reading that literature, and that led me to utopianism. And that led me, through Kropotkin, into anarchism, pacifist anarchism. And at some point it occurred to me that nobody had written an anarchist utopia. We’d had socialist utopias and dystopias and all the rest, but anarchism—hey, that would be fun. So then I read all the anarchist literature I could get, which was quite a lot, if you went to the right little stores in Portland. INTERVIEWER Where you got your books in a brown paper bag? LE GUIN You had to get to know the owner of the store. And if he trusted you, he’d take you to the back room and show you this wealth of material, some of which was violent anarchism and would have been frowned on by the government. I swam around in that stuff for a couple years before I could approach my lump of concrete again, and I discovered it had fallen apart. I had my character, and he was a physicist, but he wasn’t who I thought he was. So that book started not with an idea but with a whole group of ideas coming together. It was a very demanding book to write, because I had to invent that society pretty much from scratch, with a lot of help from the anarchist writers, particularly Americans like Paul Goodman, who had actually tried to envision what an anarchist society might be like.
    3. INTERVIEWER And featuring male protagonists. LE GUIN Absolutely. Then came literary feminism, which was a tremendous problem and gift to me. I had to . . . handle it. And I wasn’t sure I could, because I’m not much good on theory. Go away, just let me write. But the fact is, I was getting stuck in my writing. I couldn’t keep pretending I was a man. And so feminism came along at just the right moment for me.
    4. LE GUIN The breakthrough was unconscious. It’s a short book, published in 1978, called The Eye of the Heron. It’s about two colonies on another planet—one of them is a bunch of pacifists, Gandhian types. The other one is a criminal colony sent mostly from South America. The two places are side by side. My hero was from the Gandhian society, a nice young man. And then there was a girl, the daughter of the boss of the criminal society. And the nice young hero insisted on getting himself shot, about halfway through the book. And I said, Hey, you can’t do that! You’re my protagonist! My own unconscious mind was forcing me to realize that the weight of the story was in the girl’s consciousness, not the boy’s. INTERVIEWER What led you to set The Left Hand of Darkness in a world where gender is fluid? LE GUIN That was my ignorant approach to feminism. I knew just enough to realize that gender itself was coming into question. We didn’t have the language yet to say that gender is a social construction, which is how we shorthand it now. But gender—what is gender? Does it need to be male, does it need to be female? Gender had been thrown into the arena where science fiction goes in search of interesting subjects to revisit and re-question. I thought, Well, gee, nobody’s done that. Actually, what I didn’t know is that, slightly before me, Theodore Sturgeon had written a book called Venus Plus X. It’s worth checking out, a rare thing, an early male approach to considering gender as—at least partly—socially constructed. Sturgeon was a talented, warm-hearted writer, so it’s also interesting in itself. Stylistically, he was not a great writer, but he was a very good storyteller and a very good mind. But I, of course, went off in a different direction. You could say I was asking myself, What does it mean to be a woman, or a man, male or female? And what if you weren’t?
    5. LE GUIN Updike did a beautiful review of a young-adult novel of mine, The Beginning Place, in The New Yorker. He was always a generous reviewer. And Harold Bloom—he’s put in a really good word for me. It’s funny, The Anxiety of Influence came out at just the time that women were discovering other women writers and saying, Hey, we have influences! We never did before! Here were all the men worrying about the anxiety of being influenced and the women were going, Whoopee!