998 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Palmer, P. J. (1998). The Courage to Teach : Exploring the Inner Landscape of a Teacher’s Life (Vol. 1st ed). San Francisco, Calif: Jossey-Bass. Retrieved from http://search.ebscohost.com.libproxy.nau.edu/login.aspx?direct=true&db=nlebk&AN=26046&site=ehost-live&scope=site
    2. The disconnected life of a teacher

  2. www.salesforce.com www.salesforce.com
    1. Salesforce Chatter for Module 2 DB post and Paper For overall authentic Professional Developement in Higher Education.

  3. www-chronicle-com.libproxy.nau.edu www-chronicle-com.libproxy.nau.edu
    1. Technology

      This website explores technology news within the field of higher education. The site contains a wide variety of news articles on current issues, trends, and research surrounding the integration of technology in universities and colleges. This includes technology's prevalence in teaching and learning, institutional decisions, and societal trends of higher education. The articles are published by authors for "The Chronicle of Higher Education," a leading newspaper and website for higher education journalism. Rating: 7/10

    1. This website is the "Resources" archive for the IgniteED Labs at Arizona State University's Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College. The IgniteED Labs allow students, staff, and faculty to explore innovative and emerging learning technology such as virtual reality (VR), artifical intelligence (AI), 3-D printing, and robotics. The left side of this site provides several resources on understanding and effectively using various technologies available in the IgniteED labs. Each resources directs you to external websites, such as product tutorials on Youtube, setup guides, and the products' websites. The right column, "Tech Literacy Resources," contains a variety of guides on how students can effectively and strategically use different technologies. Resources include "how-to" user guides, online academic integrity policies, and technology support services. Rating: 9/10

    1. This article studies the impact of external differentiation and vocational orientation of lower and upper in secondary education. Hard Read for sure. The age range for participants is 30-44 year old's in 18 countries. The results are what you would expect..

  4. learn-us-east-1-prod-fleet01-xythos.s3.us-east-1.amazonaws.com learn-us-east-1-prod-fleet01-xythos.s3.us-east-1.amazonaws.com
    1. This study researches the development of clinical trainers and their learners. Also, the article discussed how to create effective training. Key Words knowledge translation, training transfer, continuing professional education, instructional design

    1. Teaching and learning methods: opreparing for teaching ofacilitating the integration of knowledge, skills and attitudes oteaching and learning in groups ofacilitating learning and setting ground rules oexplaining ogroup dynamics omanaging the group olectures osmall group teaching methods and discussion techniques oseminars and tutorials ocomputer based teaching and learning – information technology and the World Wide Web ointroducing problem based learning ocase based learning and clinical scenarios

      this website is consisted of available resources.

      Rating: 9/10

    1. As educational technologies, instructional design and online learning/content delivery platforms keep evolving, more learners with more needs and motives will be drawn to taking online courses – a growing demand that in turn will spur further improvements in technology and delivery.

      Educational Technology offers free articles with sources.

      Rating: 5/10

    1. From Peg Cheechi, an instructional designer at Rush University: informing faculty members about the advantages of working with experts in course design.

      The Chronicle of Higher Education is a website and newspaper informing students and faculty of college affairs and news.

      Rating: 9/10

    1. This book is current from 2015 and is one stop shopping for technology integration in schools. Integrations and Blooms taxonomy theory, ISTE standards, pathways (yes, it is still a slow process), understanding about classroom set up when using technology and learning theories, online, web 2.0, teacher resources, multilingual tools, different screens, digital cameras, and COPPA, Privacy, and Copyright laws. If you are looking for a job in technology integration in schools this is a must read and resource manual. rating 10/10

    1. This is an interesting article for assistive technology in adult literacy as you can listen to it like a person with LD would. Initially, it was beneficial, but load times and generic voice are challenging for me, but I am not used to using the AT device. Also interesting is the lack of study on the matter of LD in adult literacy, and therefore this study is really "surveying the gaps." Sadly, what we do know is that minority LD students rates for graduation are lower than whites with LD, and that the dropout rates are higher as well. LD students access to AT may be key to understanding the dynamics of graduation and drop out rates in addition to literacy. A proven solution is small group tutoring with AT as it can be empowering and enabling LD students to learn.

    1. This article offers insight to technology integration for adults in Arizona. Recognizing the importance of technology in education, Arizona has put together a plan on integration for adult education. Using trends, understanding challenges, devising strategies to meet those challenges now and in the future, and meeting the expectations of how a successful learner is defined are a part of this plan for Arizona. It starts with a vision and three goals for Arizona. From there the goals and trends are implemented in short term, mid term, and long term goals over five plus years. With expecting challenges they are able to address them head on and use innovative practices. 8/10

  5. Nov 2019
    1. n. Key to this model is the assumption that online education has evolved as a subset of learning in general rather than a subset of distance learning

      This article helps the reader understand the major theories that are related to technology using the leaning theories, theoretical frameworks, and models. Rate: 4/5

    1. New technologies make it possible for students to tailor their course schedules, online classes, and brick-and- mortar learning venues to attain targeted degrees.

      With society and technology always changing. Learning new technology is key to getting ahead in higher education. Rate: 3/5

  6. Oct 2019
    1. 5PH1NX: 5tudent Peer Heuristic for 1Nformation Xchange - we think of it as a “curiously trans-media” use case in peeragogical assessment.

      I'm not sure whether the beginning of the book is the right place for this. First of all, 5PH1NX is a horrible name - maybe people in edu institutions are used to this kind of naming, but others run away screaming. Second, this is about educational institutions. Peeragogy however is about society at large, including people who left school long ago and want to work with others in order to learn, independently from institutions.

    1. ఎప్పటికైనా Knowledge Centric Value Based Education రావాలని కోరుకుందాం

      I like the problem statement, but what is this knowledge centric value based education? Is this a good solution?

      It is essential to realize that there is no magic bullet that can solve such a complex problem that is so central to our life, livelihood and the urban upper middle class (shall I call brahminical!?) way of life. There must be many solutions working together towards the same idea. But first we should be clear on the problem and acknowledge it!

    1. So long as there are still predatory, for-profit, financial-aid thieves masquerading as colleges and universities, online courses will still be held in suspicion in many quarters of academe.

      We can't merely ensure that we're looking at the services provided by the leaders of the field and do our best to match those efforts, we also need to make sure what we're providing doesn't look like that provided in the for-profit sector. There should be an obvious distinction. This was a big takeaway for me.

  7. Sep 2019
    1. When new knowledge is integrated with and connected to existing knowledge, that new knowledge is easier to understand and to remember. A professor’s job is to build scaffolding from existing knowledge on which to hang incoming new knowledge. Using a concept map is one way to build that scaffolding.
    1. Liberals are always slow to realize that there can be friendly, idealistic people who have little use for liberal values.

      So idealistic with other values?

    2. identity alone should neither uphold nor invalidate an idea

      Except ideas have always been structured by identify. Perhaps universal ideas might be better seen as the identity politics of a privilege that doesn't appreciate being interrogated.

    3. Our goal shouldn’t be to tell children what to think. The point is to teach them how to think so they can grow up to find their own answers.

      How many generations have passed mistaking this solution as progress?

    4. The teaching of civics has dwindled since the 1960s—a casualty of political polarization

      So the lack of civics lamented above is not caused by the global cultural studies that happened? There could be both, right?

    5. festooned with all the authoritarian excess of the new progressivism

      Do the policies and practices that shape disadvantaged lives come festooned (eg, drug sentencing laws)? Or do they seep out with a colder, darker, less obvious rhetoric?

    6. an idea of education based on real meri

      Please define this "real merit".

    7. That pragmatic genius for which Americans used to be known and admired, which included a talent for educating our young—how did it desert us?

      Known by who for educating who? This is the most ridiculously reductionist and nostalgic lament in the entire piece.

    8. the universal principles of equality, dignity, and freedom

      It's easy to reach for these "universal" principles, which have always been universal in theory only. It doesn't surprise me that folks heretofore excluded challenge universal principles that have not served their purposes.

    9. It was a quiet plea to be left alone.

      Or was it a quiet plea that people can figure things out without hard rules and signs?

    10. Q also used the boys’ bathroom, which led to problems with other boys.

      What were the problems with the other boys?

    11. The issue that had roiled the grown-ups in his life seemed to have had no effect on him at all.

      I wonder if that suggests the tests matter less, or more?

    12. A 95 percent opt-out rate was a resounding success. It rivaled election results in Turkmenistan.

      Wow. That's an incredibly long reach to make an incendiary point.

    13. An extensive survey of American political opinion published last year by a nonprofit called More in Common found that a large majority of every group, including black Americans, thought “political correctness” was a problem.

      This is where it gets really interesting. I'd have to explore what branches out from here, but the term "political correctness" is not really just one thing that everyone agrees on, and from where I'm sitting, mostly seems to arise around areas where people who historically have had less of a voice start having one that disturbs established POVs.

    14. in part out of disillusionment with the early promise of his presidency—out of expectations raised and frustrated

      hm: another statement I'd need to think about or hear more about. How would we measure if there really was significant disillusionment from hope Obama's presidency raised? Sounds sorta right, but hard to prove.

    15. security

      Wait, how does meritocracy value security?

    16. He had picked this moment to render his very first representational drawing, and our hopes rose.

      I like an alternate theory: their kid had been making representational drawings for a long time, but purposely obscuring it until the revelation could make the biggest impact.

    17. On that freezing sidewalk, I felt a shudder of revulsion at the perversions of meritocracy. And yet there I was, cursing myself for being 30th in line.

      This is a great juxtaposition of the trap the author and so many upper-middle-class people find themselves in.

    18. children into overworked, inauthentic success machines

      A worry I have for sure...

    19. stay married

      Ahhh...so THIS is why we stay married!

    20. True meritocracy came closest to realization with the rise of standardized tests in the 1950s

      Interesting, I'm ready to buy that the post-WWII period had the biggest opening to education in the USA — tho far from truly open or meritocratic and definitely unevenly distributed in many ways, including between K12 and higher ed — but I'm not sure I'd put standardized tests first in a list of reasons for the opening. I'd want to hear more about that.

    1. Notably, several of the catalysts identified by participants were not directly related to an awareness of OER or open textbooks. Several of these catalysts are related to innovation, learner empowerment, and increasing access to knowledge more generally. While these individuals identified as open education practitioners, they did not necessarily cite OER as their starting point for integrating openness in teaching and learning.

      This is an interesting conclusion as it has oft been stated that OER are a gateway to OEP. While that appears to be the case for 3 of the participants, for the rest it appears that OER was not the starting point to OEP. What bears deeper investigation is whether the second or third step to OEP was OER. Reminds me of a blog post I wrote a few years back wondering if OEP required OER http://clintlalonde.net/2017/02/04/does-open-pedagogy-require-oer/

    2. Thomas further commented “it’s openness in what we bring into the classroom, openness in what we take out of the classroom, and an openness between what happens between the students and myself and the students and each other in how we organise the classroom.”

      Great quote

    3. Alice noted her feeling that the use and sharing of OER were one of the “less threatening” components of OEP.

      This is an important change in perception that has occurred in the past 10-15 years of OER. OER's used to be met with much skepticism by faculty. It is nice to see that these are now becoming "less threatening" and, by extension, more accessible.

    4. “students will write differently, you know, if they know it’s not just going to their professor.

      Changes the audience and gets students to think about writing for a larger, perhaps more general audience. This is an important aspect if we want to have, say, highly technical disciplines, like sciences, learning to engage more broadly with the public. Having learners understand the importance of writing for an audience that is more general could become an important open pedagogy principle for disciplines that want to have their work have a broader impact with the general public.

    1. Liberal education

      I would like you to focus on:

      • The main ideas in the article
      • The underlined vocabulary words and any new words to you
      • New structures that you could start using in your writing Make sure you write notes including your impression, definitions of words or any questions you might have on the text.

    Tags

    Annotators

    1. Universal Design for Learning: Theory and Practice by Meyer, Rose, and Gordon (a book recognized as the core statement about UDL, which you can read for free) walks us through how educators actively change their practice to become more inclusive and helps us weigh choices in terms of how we create unnecessary barriers:
    1. The Right to Learn Undergraduate Research Collective (R2L), directed by professor Manuel Espinoza, is a research group at the University of Colorado Denver that, for more than a decade, has studied the legal, moral, and philosophical criteria of educational dignity.
  8. Aug 2019
    1. Social justice education does not merely examine difference or diversity but pays careful attention to the systems of power and privilege that give rise to social inequality, and encourages students to critically examine oppression on institutional, cultural, and individual levels in search of opportunities for social action in the service of social change.
    2. include student empowerment, the equitable distribution of resources and social responsibility, and her processes to include democracy, a student-centered focus, dialogue, and an analysis of power.

      social

    1. I think it’s important to recognise we have very limited performance pay for teachers now. There’s an exceptional teachers program in New South Wales. People apply for it and they don’t get a lot; actually I think it’s ridiculous, they only get about an extra $5,000 dollars a year. But there is an attempt in New South Wales on a limited scale to financially reward the better teachers under that program.

      What is he referring to?

    2. In most of our disadvantaged schools in New South Wales we have instructional teachers: so two teachers in the classroom for a good part of the time.

      I'm not aware of this operating in a High School environment.

    3. have an allocation of funding for those that are achieving the best results.

      The school which are already successful don't need additional funding. The schools that are not being successful need additional targeted funding.

    1. 10or13onlyattend&thosenotregul

      the school on the mission only has 10-13 irregular attending students

    Tags

    Annotators

    1. Education is one of the key sources of social equity.

      Yes! And this is why education cannot be "sold" and cannot be handled as a business. If we let money dictate the ways of education, it will hardly ever lead to social equity.

    1. Far more than a teaching method, education is a moral and political practice actively involved not only in the production of knowledge, skills and values but also in the construction of identities, modes of identification, and forms of individual and social agency.

      Giroux extends what he means by "education."

  9. Jul 2019
    1. Learning

      Notes: -bringing play into education "messing around"/"geeking out"-interest driven orientation. developing sophisticated tech/media literacy

      • learning opportunities in both friend space and geek space
    1. The architecture of the platform where I published allowed authorial control of content but could not control context collapse or social interactions.

      These are pieces which the IndieWeb should endeavor to experiment in and attempt to fix. Though I will admit that pieces of the IndieWeb layers on top of platforms like WordPress can help to mitigate some context collapse and aggregate social interactions better. (eg: reply context and POSSE)

    2. There is a sense that one can cobble together a common public by overlapping various social media platforms and audiences. Many of my colleagues are doing a fine job of problematizing the intersections of private social media and the university. The larger project from which this essay is drawn is part of that emerging conversation.

      I wonder here what role an IndieWeb-based version of academe looks like in which teachers all own their content on their own websites to make a more explicit appeal of work that they've done. Compare this with the concept that what they may be doing on Twitter isn't "work" and which isn't judged as such.

    3. Institutions, publics, and some media elites are encouraging academics to be more visible in the public sphere.

      I can't help but be reminded of the early professoriate in the 1400's when teachers were expected to be well known or interesting enough to have their own local following and pull in their own individual students. If they weren't the right sort of thought leaders or didn't teach the "right" subjects, they failed as teachers and were kicked out of the university. Social media in this era would have been more interesting whereas, now it barely seems to be a direct economic factor. (cross reference O. Gingerich, The Book Nobody Read)

    4. Scholars who are also members of marginalized groups disproportionately take up this kind of engaged scholarship, often without commensurate credit from university administrators or colleagues (Ellison and Eatmen 2008; Park 1996; Stanley 2006; Taylor and Raeburn 1995; Turner et al 2008; Villalpando and Bernal 2002).
    1. driven by data—where schools use data to identify a problem, select a strategy to address the problem, set a target for improvement, and iterate to make the approach more effective and improve student achievement.

      Gates data model.

    2. a successful transition from high school to postsecondary education and career-training programs.

      Annotation is one of those core academic practices that spans K-16.

    3. regularly use data to continuously improve the supports, instruction, and learning students experience.

      Data from annotation informing teaching practices, understanding of learning, success, at admin level.

    4. real-time assessments for gauging student progress

      Real-time grading/assessment for reading = annotation

      And note just assessment, but presence: peer learning; teacher-student feedback, ...

  10. Jun 2019
    1. This year, the Promise’s marketing has emphasized vocational college. Administrators hope marginal students will be less likely to drop out of such programs because they are shorter.

      Vocational programs are great for "Builders", who learn by doing stuff than merely reciting study material.

    2. “The challenges that people bring with them to education because of poverty don’t just go away because we say we’re going to pay for college education,”

      Reminds me of "The boy who couldn't read"

    1. A Brief History of Reading Instruction. Includes references to studies that support phonics as the best method for teaching reading and writing. Free textbook for phonics instruction: https://elink.io/p/free-phonics-books-98c2d4e

    1. Howard Gardner's theory of multiple intelligences should not be conflated with the idea of "learning styles". Most people benefit from multiple modes of learning.

    1. Every school with master’s degrees is at some stage of process in moving these programs online. Save for a very small number of elite programs, the model of full-time residential master’s is in decline. The question appears to be not if master's programs will move online, but how they will do so.

      Implications for libraries...

    1. heSchoolissmallr-10or13onlyattend&thosenotregular.Itismuchembarrusoodforthewunhof.ateacher,whosetimecanbemostlfdevotedtoit

      the school at this area is small, with irregular attendance (from both students and teacher)

    2. r8.nowtoldthem:hoIwas.&thatastheirfriend&hisfriend,hehadinvitedmotnaooo)anyhimonhisvisittot.Hespoketothemontheimportanceoftheirhaaeainglearnintotofcultivatingtheirlands&havinschoolsfortheirhildr.Ithenreadtothemsome'ortionaofScrip.fromtranlanwhichIhad&expressedtothem,throuhtheInterpreter,htohris.uubliowerenowdoingfor:eroftheirneoplo,&*h~ttheirfriendswouldarelongsendsomeonetoinstructtheir3hidron.&tellthemabout“0d&JanusChrist&heavoniftheydosiradit.-muatfirstcollootallbigband&tal‘TheChiefrepliedthihhehinaol.hadnochildren,ithathewiththembeforohecoul

      the expedition expresses to the Natives the importance of cultivating their land and building a school, the writer reads them scripture

    3. twillbedifnculttokeepchildrenlongatschoolamongtheseIndians,unlesstheyarefed,onaccountoftheirmigratoryhabitsandthedifncultyofobtainingprovision.Manyofthemresideatseveraldifferentplacesduringtheyear

      expect low attendance because of hunger and migration

    4. WithregardtoourprospectsforimmediatelybenentingtheIndians,Ihardlyknowwhattosay.

      sent by the Board to educate them and build a school

    1. The belief that humans are essentially active, free and strive for meaning in personal terms

      sounds obvious when you say it like that.

  11. May 2019
    1. Schools can ensure their curriculum are up to date and training students for the areas of science with the most potential for advancement

      This completely flies in the face of the need for more basic science research which is far more likely to create vast potential advancement rather than focusing on smaller edge cases.

    1. Six key themes emerged from the data: benefits of an ePortfolio at the curriculum level, ePortfolios as an enabling technology, the value of reflection, the role of user support, the speed and quality of feedback, and mitigating distance and isolation.

      The role of reflection is important when considering education as a transformational experience. This could be a key distinguishing feature between training and education.

    1. The name "Cahokia" is from an aboriginal people who lived in the area during the 17th century. 

      The name of the site comes from a culture that inhabited the site years after its initial construction. The name was given to it by French colonizers.

    1. There was also an astronomical observatory (“Woodhenge”), consisting of a circle of wooden posts.

      This term "Woodhenge" further points to an acknowledgment of the similarities between this site and other pyramid sites.

    1. Annotations we made during the education workshop.

    2. We should annotate this program! If any program should be annotated, it should be this one. I can't get out to DC this month, but I am VERY interested in this topic. I will definitely be cyber-stalking this conference.

    1. economic returns of education after high school

      Is change in lifetime income potential a way of measuring higher education's social contribution? Is it too broad? Can it account for distributive injustice?

    2. rankings have focused on the input side of the equation, not the output.”

      This is incredibly ham-handed, but not necessarily a bad question to be asking, esp. as digital education begins disrupting brick-and-mortar schools. Can we be more explicit about the value we add as educators?

    1. how would our education system change to take advantage of this new external symbol-manipulation capability of students and teachers (and administrators)?

      Let's say it's been twenty years since PDAs have been widely available. I returned to higher education less than ten years ago. K-12 seems to have embraced learning technologies, and their affordances, to improve primary and secondary education. In my experience, few educators with terminal degrees have made the effort while younger and more precarious teachers are slowly adopting educational technologies. Administrators are leading the way with their digital management systems and students are using proprietary social media platforms. Our institutions are doing what they were designed to do: resist change and reproduce the social order. Research paid for with public monies is as quickly privatized as that produced in corporations. Open education practices are just beginning to be explored.

      The first PDA, the Organizer, was released in 1984 by Psion, followed by Psion's Series 3, in 1991. The latter began to resemble the more familiar PDA style, including a full keyboard.[4][5] The term PDA was first used on January 7, 1992 by Apple Computer CEO John Sculley at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, Nevada, referring to the Apple Newton.[6] In 1994, IBM introduced the first PDA with full telephone functionality, the IBM Simon, which can also be considered the first smartphone. Then in 1996, Nokia introduced a PDA with telephone functionality, the 9000 Communicator, which became the world's best-selling PDA. Another early entrant in this market was Palm, with a line of PDA products which began in March 1996. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Personal_digital_assistant

  12. Apr 2019
    1. Almost every social network of note had an early signature proof of work hurdle. For Facebook it was posting some witty text-based status update. For Instagram, it was posting an interesting square photo. For Vine, an entertaining 6-second video. For Twitter, it was writing an amusing bit of text of 140 characters or fewer. Pinterest? Pinning a compelling photo. You can likely derive the proof of work for other networks like Quora and Reddit and Twitch and so on. Successful social networks don't pose trick questions at the start, it’s usually clear what they want from you.

      And this is likely the reason that the longer form blogs never went out of style in areas of higher education where people are still posting long form content. This "proof of work" is something they ultimately end up using in other areas.

      Jessifer example of three part post written for a journal that was later put back into long form for publication.

    1. There are many different theories of adult learning, including: andragogy, neuroscience, experiential learning, self-directed learning, and transformational learning. All these theories have one goal: they help you create effective learning experiences for the adult corporate learner. 

      adult learning theories including andragogy, experiential learning

    1. stressful but fascinating

      It seems like these two words sum up this last week pretty well for a majority of the group. There has been a lot of information to take in, within a short amount of time. Although it has been a bit on the chaotic side here and there, most of the class can agree that the more we see, the more fascinating it becomes. I think everyone is looking forward to attaining more clarity for the program as a whole. The enthusiasm is contagious. It seems the whole process is new for everyone, and everyone is excited for the adventure.

    1. Having our children memorize facts and figures, sit passively in class, and take mundane standardized tests completely defeats the purpose.

      To learn with enjoyment, we need to have the space to explore, experiment and fail. We need to have ownership, empowerment and the ability to be creative in the process.

    2. how much of what I learned was never actually useful later in life, and how many of my critical lessons for success I had to pick up on my own

      How relevant is the content education delivers for real-life scenarios?

      I have been there too, most of the relevant lessons and knowledge I have discovered myself in a inquisitive and curiosity quest to learn and understand more.

    1. Hi I'm and Oberman and I'm from much Paladin State University of Denver and I'm using hypothesis currently in a course and so I teach social work.

      Ann starts speaking here about her experience teach with Hypothesis in the classroom. Close this sidebar and click on the text to advance the video to this point (53:29). Ann speaks for about 4 minutes. Worth watching till the end.

    1. The ITL department at The Ohio State University at Mansfield has six primary themes: (a) developmentally appropriate practice, (b) integrated curriculum, (c) literature-based instruction, (d) classroom-based inquiry, (e) diversity and equity issues, and (f) technology integration. The goal for technology integration, like the other themes in the program, is to integrate the theme into each course of the program, when appropriate. For example, instructors find ways to integrate children’s literature into each of the methods courses, whether it is a mathematics, science, or social studies methods course. The goal is to integrate the common themes of the program throughout the methods courses and the other graduate courses leading up to student teaching.
    1. Elizabeth Evans Getzel is the Director for Transition Innovations at Virginia Commonwealth University and has a long history of working with students with disabilities in higher education. The article focuses on how the integration of support for students with disabilities is extremely important to their persistence and this includes technology integration and requires buy-in from the faculty.

    1. Author Melissa A. Venable, Ph.D. has spent her career working in career development, technology and instructional design. The article outlines technology options for career professionals to use with distance learners and how to conduct an assessment to ensure needs are being met.

      Rating: 5/10

    1. Author Catherine C. Schifter has had a long background in Educational Psychology and this article from 1999 shows her dedication to the field and provides an analysis of educators in distance learning and the evaluation that Dr. Schifter did of these programs and the motivation of faculty members who were teaching these courses at the time.

      Rating: 6/10

    1. D. Christopher Brooks, Director of Research, and Mark McCormack, Senior Director of Analytics & Research, at EDUCAUSE bring together this comprehensive report that outlines Higher Education trends for 2019. This report does feel more technical in nature, but they bring it together in a way that is laid out to be reader friendly. The 20-year technology predictions are valuable and there is a focus on using the report to plan for the future.

      Rating: 10/10

    1. This article is authored by Farouk Dey, formerly of Stanford University and currently the Vice Provost for Integrative Learning and Life Design at Johns Hopkins. Dey offers an overview of the transformation that college career services have gone through over the past 100 years and showcases 10 areas where career services will continue to change in the future, including the scope of how technology will allow for a wider reach.

      Rating: 8/10

    1. This article brings together several higher education professional who all work for Georgia Tech. They are able to touch on different areas of how technology has shaped their work and the reach it has allowed their university.

      Rating: 6/10

    1. Ashley Norris is the Chief Academic Officer at ProctorU, an organization that provides online exam proctoring for schools. This article has an interesting overview of the negative side of technology advancements and what that has meant for student's ability to cheat. While the article does culminate as an ad, of sorts, for ProctorU, it is an interesting read and sparks thoughts on ProctorU's use of both human monitors for testing but also their integration of Artificial Intelligence into the process.

      Rating: 9/10.

    1. This report is a supplemental piece specifically for Higher Education in response to the National Education Technology plan. The report is a lengthy read but offers a combination of data, examples, case studies and additional resources. The report focuses on the changing landscape of higher education and the changing qualities of what a student in college looks like (i.e. not the traditionally known 18 year old, fresh out of high school). The report also acknowledges the history fo traditional learning (i.e. paper and pencil) and how higher educational not only needs to embrace technology for the classroom use but also for the analytics implications that can help with topics such as retention.

      Rating: 10/10. Very in depth article, packed with examples and recommendations.

    1. Scott L. Howell is the Assistant to the Dean of Continuing Education at Brigham Young University and has a long career track record in the area of instructional design and online learning. The article is a bit ambitious in tackling 32 trends, but provides a good review of additional literature during each addressed trend.

      Rating: 9/10. The article itself is interesting, but its best use is the direction towards additional readings that it offers.

    1. The author, Susan Grajek, formerly of Yale University is the Vice President for Communities and Research at EDUCAUSE. Grajek brings together 5 leaders in higher education and technology to discuss the future of technology in the higher education arena. The article addresses the progress that needs to be made, especially in the adult education portion of higher eduction and acknowledges that the traditional 18-22 college student population is very small and that there is so much more of the market that needs to be reached.

      Rating: 9/10.

  13. Mar 2019
    1. Knowing an injustice is taking place may make educators feel all the more helpless,without a productive avenue of resistance.
    2. Everyday acts of resistance require literacy educators to navigate seemingly indissoluble contradictions.

      Is this basically saying that we need to teach educators how to say "no"?

    1. The world’s largest selection of courses

      Udemy is an online platform where experts in various fields can create paid courses. You can learn languages, web design, photography, musical instruments all in your own time. The platform also allows for extensive ranking and reviews to be put on instructors and courses to keep the quality high. Instruction is inexpensive and self-paced. it is larger aimed at teenagers and adult learners and focuses on skills. Rating 10/10

    1. Designing Technology for Adult Learners: Applying Adult Learning Theory

      Discusses how adult learning theory can be applied for digital learning for adults. It suggests making sure interactions are built on real world and relevant situations, that learners and go at their own pace, they are allowed to reflect on their learning, and interact with each other and different points of view. Rating 10/10

    1. The eZoomBook Tool: A Blended and Eclectic Approach to Digital Pedagogy

      Discusses the use of the eZoomBook Tool which has the ability to allow learners to navigate back through subject matter they need to refresh on as they learn new material. It allows peer to peer teaching and working which is it's most successful feature for adult learners. the eZB template is open-format and can be adapted to a variety of learning situations. Results from their initial experiments show high use of intrinsic motivation for adult learners once they got a handle on the platform.

    1. Beyond the Click: Rethinking Assessment of an Adult Professional Development MOOC

      Examines the design and implementation of a MOOC about flipped teaching. It used digital surveys and the LMS system to gauge participant experiences and expectations. A unique aspect of this MOOC is that it asked participants to set what level of activity they expected to have in the program: active, passive, drop-in, observer. And it found that 60% of people engaged directly at that level. This is useful for designing online education experience and connecting participants with each other and in the classroom based upon their learning goals.

    1. Can an Evidence-Based Blended Learning Model Serve Healthcare Patients and Adult Education Students?

      Discusses the use of blended-learning incorporating technology especially for adult education programs that reduce education gaps and help the under-employed with career readiness. This also focuses in on adults with chronic disease and how online education might better support their needs. It uses constructivist leanings placing education in the context of activity and environment and recreating the correct environments online.

    1. The Career Curriculum Continuum

      Discusses the place of universities in lifelong learning, especially with the advancement of technology in education in the workforce. The career curriculum continuum, includes free and self-paced options such as MOOCs, educational video on Youtube, and Wikis, but also suggests more structured learning placed in context. Universities can offer this as short courses that are cheaper and offer more options for pathways to a full degree program. It also suggests professional certificates for expanding the skills of those already working. Digital institutions will be the most widely used methods for consuming knew knowledge and advancing skills. Rating 10/10

    1. Using Web 2.0 to teach Web 2.0: A case study in aligningteaching, learning and assessment with professionalpractice

      Research article. Discussed the use of web 2.0 including blogs, wikis, and social media as a method of information sharing that is impacting education through teaching and learning management. The work suggests that learning outcomes, activities, and assessment have to be in alignment to create effective learning experiences and uses a case study within an information management program in which students use various web 2.0 tools and document their use .

    1. The use of digital technologies across the adult life span in distance education.

      Research article. This article explores how older and younger student approach studying through the use of technology and reveals that those in older age groups were more likely to use technology in deep in focused ways to study once they got the hang of it and younger groups were more likely to remain on the surface level of a variety of technologies.

    1. Bridging Formal and Informal Learning Through Technology in the Twenty-First Century: Issues and Challenges

      From Springer Link, this is an abstract from a book titled, Bridging Formal and Informal Learning Through Technology in the Twenty-First Century: Issues and Challenges. While the entire content is not here, if purchased, this book/download could offer a large amount of useful information about this topic. It covers learning typically associated with technology such as social networking, game-based learning and digital making.

      Rating 7/10

    1. Technology Infused Professional Development: A Framework for Development and Analysis

      Technology Infused Professional Development by Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education relays information about the best practices for technology to be a large part of professional development. Knowledge base consists of three major domains. They are knowledge of learner, knowledge of content and knowledge of best ways and means to help students learn. Learning is considered both an active and social process. True, deep learning must be applied to new situation and this is not easy with new learning. "If we don't change the direction we are going, we're likely to end up where we are heading"

      Rating 10/10

    1. Effect of a metacognitive scaffolding on self-efficacy, metacognition, and achievement in e-learning environments

      Research paper. This work highlights how scaffolding, meaning students work through their learning in stages with support from digital technology, making adjustments to their learning environment as needed as they progress through material. Self-evaluations are a critical component of this to help reflect on the content learned. Scaffolding helps students determine not only what to do but how to do it until they are ready to learn more fully on their own. Rating 6/10

    1. Educational technology professional development as transformative learning opportunities

      Educational technology professional development can transform learning opportunities. This article focuses on adult learning theory as technology can be "intimidating and frustrating." All of this spiked my interest and I was excited to read more. However, to read more you must purchase the content of the entire article. So, in all this left me disappointed. Rating 2/10

    1. "In this fascinating book, Tony Wagner addresses one of our most urgent questions: How do we create the next generation of innovators? By telling the stories of young creators, and by taking us inside cutting-edge programs, Wagner shows that the answer isn't to double-down on outmoded, formulaic solutions--but to embrace the principles of play, passion, and purpose. Creating Innovators is important reading for anyone concerned about the future."--Daniel H. Pink, author of Drive and A Whole New Mind

      Reference this in coursework provided in a liberal arts college.

    1. nontraditional students. The education department at OSU-M is housed within the School of Teaching and Learning and the Integrated Teaching and Learning (ITL) section. The Integrated Teaching and Learning section of the College of Education serves those preservice teachers who are studying to be teachers of children age 3 to Grade 8. The Ohio State University Master of Education degree, the degree that offers course requirements for licensure in elementary and