32 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2021
  2. Jul 2021
    1. I like the hovercard-like UI that enables one to see prior versions of links on a page. It would be cool to have this sort of functionality built into preview cards for these as well.

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Jonathan Zittrain</span> in The Rotting Internet Is a Collective Hallucination - The Atlantic (<time class='dt-published'>07/08/2021 22:07:17</time>)</cite></small>

    1. A solid overview article about the architectural deficiencies of the web for long term archival and access as well as some ideas for fixing the issue and a plea to attempt to make things better for the future.

    2. John Bowers, Elaine Sedenberg, and I have described how that might work, suggesting that libraries can again serve as semi-closed archives of both public and private censorial actions online. We can build what the Germans used to call a giftschrank, a “poison cabinet” containing dangerous works that nonetheless should be preserved and accessible in certain circumstances. (Art imitates life: There is a “restricted section” in Harry Potter’s universe, and an aptly named “poison room” in the television adaptation of The Magicians.)

      I love this idea of a poison cabinet or giftschrank.

      How might this work in an oral society? How would it be designed?

    3. Libraries in these scenarios are no longer custodians for the ages of anything, whether tangible or intangible, but rather poolers of funding to pay for fleeting access to knowledge elsewhere.

      A major archiving issue in the digital era is that libraries are no longer the long term storage repositories they have otherwise been for the past two thousand years.

      What effects will this have on the future? Particularly once the financial interests of the owning companies no longer exists?

  3. Jun 2021
    1. Bookmarklets to check common archive sites for archives of the current page(all open in a new tab or window) Archive site Bookmarklet Archive.org javascript:void(window.open('https://web.archive.org/web/*/'+location.href)) UKGWA javascript:void(window.open('http://webarchive.nationalarchives.gov.uk/*/'+location.href))
  4. May 2021
  5. ota.bodleian.ox.ac.uk ota.bodleian.ox.ac.uk
    1. Oxford Text Archive A repository of full-text literary and linguistic resources. Thousands of texts in more than 25 languages.
  6. Mar 2021
    1. These newsletters are the most backed up pieces of writing in history, copies in millions of inboxes, on millions of hard drives and servers, far more than any blog post. More robust than an Internet Archive container. LOCKSS to the max. These might be the most durable copies yet of ourselves. They’re everywhere but privately so, hidden, piggybacking on the most accessible, oldest networked publishing platform in the world.

      This is an interesting point about longevity of content. It's definitely a good reason to email it out as well as to post it on your own website and archive it all at the same time.

  7. Feb 2021
  8. May 2019
    1. photographies et des films.

      Pour les archives sonores, il y a souvent la "boite à chaussures" : cf https://medihal.archives-ouvertes.fr/medihal-00835187

    2. l faut attendre juin 1949 pour que la question de la collecte, du classement, de la conservation, et de la communication des archives scientifiques soit concrètement posée

      En 1902, Léon Azoulay dresse la liste des archives sonores recueillie par des anthroopologues (cf Liste des phonogrammes composant le Musée phonographique de la Société d'Anthropologie [article]sem-linkAzoulay (L.)Bulletins et Mémoires de la Société d'Anthropologie de Paris Année 1902 3 pp. 652-666 https://www.persee.fr/doc/bmsap_0301-8644_1902_num_3_1_6077) : ne peut-on y voir les premières archives de terrain organisées ?

  9. Aug 2018
    1. (Sometimes, in the early years, I called these the Service System and the User System)

      As he does in the Project MAC memo, summer 1963.

    2. By 1959 1 was lucky enough to get a small grant from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR, from Harold Wooster and Rowena Swanson) which carried me for several years -- not enough for my full-time work, but by 1960 SRI began pitching in the difference.

      Actually, I think Doug has this backwards, at least from what I can see in the archives. SRI did pitch in half of his salary, but that seems to have been the first funding, in early 1960. The AFOSR proposal was submitted in mid-December 1960 and the funding, which allowed Doug to go full-time, kicked in in March, 1961.

  10. Jun 2018
    1. In the first question posed above – (there may be a document (or documents) in an archive with the potential to bring down a government. If this hasn’t happened yet, does that record have power?) – the latency of the archive-as-content is assumed. In other words, there’s always the possibility that somewhere in the repository is the single, golden item that will reveal itself as ‘the one’ – whatever that may be – and then the injection of agency, the transition from inherent to active power occurs, as Mike notes. More broadly though, I think there’s an ‘imagined’ power in archival repositories. Not only on the basis that they are often mythologized as the store of potentially ‘golden’ items, but also in the way that they allow communities to potentially imagine themselves as communities. This is Benedict Anderson’s thesis – that to be part of a group there needs to be a range of shared or widely accepted attributes and/or elements that the group imagines themselves all sharing – and the archival repository, although it doesn’t feature in his work, I think is a key to fulfilling this role. And in this role, it’s not about the one item, series or accession, but the very existence of the thing called an archive that is key. It has its mysterious ways, supported by a range of cool stereotypes (cardigan, ‘dust’, things ‘lost only to be ‘discovered’, ‘reading rooms etc…) which help to establish the archive as more than a thing, and all those attributes help to give it the air of mystery. If you need something, it’s likely to be ‘in the archive’. Even if you don’t, there’s safety in the knowledge that someone, somewhere, has carefully archived it. And it’s that mythologising I think that creates a peculiar type of archival power, at once active and activated, latent and potential.
    2. One aspect of such discussions is that power – whether assigned or inherent – is often treated as an actual or potential property of a discrete thing. But, looking at Annelie’s post, particular phrases stand out: Windschuttle engaged with archival documentation records were accessed and interpreted the Ngarrindjeri hold an extensive archival collection All are relational. They describe relationships between people (or groups of people) and records. Annelie approaches this idea with the following: “ultimately someone needs to be there to engage with the records and therefore assign power.” Taking this a step further, to understand power we need to understand the ways in which things interrelate. This doesn’t have to be engagement with the records (in the sense of access and use). An organisation which prevents access to its records (or destroys them) by doing so produces and reproduces structures of power. Power here is not something inherent to things, or assigned to things by agents, but the product of complex systems involving things, their relationships, and their contexts.
    1. The archival community needs game changers and iconoclasts. In some areas we need to directly challenge the established order and refuse to accept some practices and institutions as they currently stand. We need to show a willingness to adopt a DIY approach based on necessity; and we need to push ourselves forward, so we are seen and heard standing up for what we believe in (even those of us who consider ourselves introverts). Bring in the Clash or the Dead Kennedys and you get a strong sense of political and social justice. With Patti Smith comes a fusion of genres. With the Ramones at their best comes a stripped back, short, sharp shock. With riot grrrl comes a refusal to accept oppression based on gender, sexuality or class.

      This contains a some pretty good ideas around what 'a hacker in the archives' or 'archive hacking' might be.

  11. Jul 2017
  12. Jun 2017
  13. Jul 2016
    1. "The BBC Domesday Project was a pair of interactive videodiscs made by the BBC in London to celebrate the 900th anniversary of the original Domesday Book and published in November 1986. It was one of the major interactive projects of its time, and it was undertaken on a scale not seen since."

      "In 1983, a BBC Television producer named Peter Armstrong wondered if it would be possible to harness the Domesday philosophy to modern Britain. With the large user base of microcomputers in British schools (helped by a government subsidy) it was feasible to ask schools around the UK to survey their areas to produce a database of how Britain looked to the British in 1986."

      "...the original Domesday book is still readable after (at the time) 925 years while our 15 year old one is not ... unless you have the original computer/videodisc system and it still works of course."

      "The first visible manifestation of a reappearance of the BBC Domesday Project was achieved in a project called CAMiLEON, which was a research project that investigated emulation as a digital preservation strategy and was based at the Universities of Michigan and Leeds. [CAMiLEON web site ... with supreme irony this is now only available via the internet archive]"

  14. Jun 2016
    1. The kind of due diligence that, in the mid-nineteen-nineties, would have taxed a team of private eyes is now readily available at the touch of an “enter” key. The fact that a virtual ocean of information exists doesn’t mean that it’s known, doesn’t mean that a prosecution team would now do better at warding off its effect on the jury, and doesn’t mean that a defense team would make different use of it.

      Archival Research

    2. Archival Research

    3. Archival research.

  15. Apr 2016
  16. Jan 2016
    1. Guidelines for publishing GLAM data (galleries, libraries, archives, museums) on GitHub. It applies to publishing any kind of data anywhere.

      • Document the schema of the data.
      • Make the usage terms and conditions clear.
      • Tell people how to report issues.<br> Or, tell them that they're on their own.
      • Tell people whether you accept pull requests (user-contributed edits and additions), and how.
      • Tell people how often the data will be updated, even if the answer is "sporadically" or "maybe never".

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_Knowledge<br> http://openglam.org/faq/

  17. Dec 2015
    1. an ex-static archive, of an archive not assembled behind stone walls but suspended in a liquid element behind a luminous screen; the archive becomes a virtual repository of knowledge without visible limits, an archive in which the material now becomes immaterial. (ii)

      Is this a layered, annotatable archive, like a finely tuned kaleidoscope?

  18. Aug 2015
  19. Jul 2015
    1. She said that's because, to an archivist, everything's worth saving.

      Although, a big part of being an archivist is appraisal - determining what's worth saving and what isn't, based on institutional mission and funding. Yale probably has enough money to do this, which most archives do not.

  20. Dec 2014