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  1. Last 7 days
    1. Fig. 6

      Accuracy percentage as a function of confidence within male and female participants in experiment 3.

      Accuracy and confidence were significantly positively correlated for both males and females.

    2. Fig. 5

      Accuracy percentage as a function of confidence between male and female participants in Experiment 3.

      Accuracy and confidence were significantly positively correlated for both males and females, and females increased their accuracy as a function of confidence more so than males did.

    1. Fig. 3.

      Magnitude of effect size in sex differences as a function of problem position.

      Shows that the magnitude of sex difference effect size increased the further subjects got into the set. I.e., the further subjects got into the set, the greater the sex difference in performance was (males outperformed females).

    2. Fig. 1.

      The figures that are shown in the Vandenburg and Kuse MRT. The target stimulus is the leftmost stimulus shown here. Two of the stimuli to the left of the target figure are rotated versions of the target figure, and two of them are distractor figures. Participants had to identify which figures were rotated versions of the target figure.

    3. Fig. 2.

      Percentage of problems attempted as a function of problem position for males and females in the first and second sets of study 1.

      Both males and females would attempt less problems the further they got in the set, but this effect was greater for females than for males. Also, both males and females attempted more problems the further they got in the second set than in the first set, revealing a practice effect.

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  2. Jun 2022
    1. Fig. 3

      Accuracy percentage as a function of confidence rating within male and female participants in experiment 1.

    2. Fig. 2

      Accuracy percentage as a function of confidence rating between male and female participants in experiment 1.

    3. Table 1

      Mean accuracy percentage (along with sample size and standard deviation) for males and females and effect size of sex difference in accuracy percentage for all conditions of each experiment.

      Effect size of sex difference in accuracy percentage was significant in the first and second experiments (p < .05; p < .01), the confidence condition of the third experiment (p < .001), the high confidence condition of the fourth experiment (p < .01), and the low confidence condition of the fourth experiment (p < .06).

    1. C

      Alpha lateralization index scores for correct and incorrect responses to valid and invalid trials in the 75% condition. Alpha lateralization index score showed no statistical trends (p = 0.532).

    2. (B)

      Differences in alpha lateralization index between high and low RT trials by cue reliability percentages. Differences in alpha lateralization index between high and low RT trials significantly decreased with cue reliability percentages (p < 0.01).

    3. (A

      Differences in alpha lateralization index between correct and incorrect trials by cue reliability percentages. Differences in alpha lateralization index between correct and incorrect trials showed a statistical trend of decreasing with cue reliability percentages (p = 0.081).

    4. D

      Alpha lateralization index scores for high and low RT responses to valid and invalid trials in the 75% condition. Alpha lateralization index score showed a near statistically significant trend of having a higher ratio of low RT to high RT trials for the invalid trials than for the valid trials (p = 0.056).

    5. B

      Alpha lateralization index scores for low RT and high RT trials in the 100% reliability condition. Alpha lateralization index score is significantly higher for low RT than high RT trials (p < 0.05).

    6. A

      Alpha lateralization index scores for correct and incorrect trials in the 100% reliability condition. Alpha lateralization index score is significantly higher for correct than incorrect trials (p < 0.05).

    7. A

      Topographical plots showing pre-stimulus alpha power in sensors as a contrast between attention left and attention right (-0.06 to 0.06) in the 100%, 75%, and 50% conditions. Pre-stimulus alpha power in sensors over left and right somatosensory regions showed significant lateralization in the 100% and 75% conditions. Pre-stimulus alpha power in the sensor over the left somatosensory region showed significant lateralization in the 50% condition, and the effect was much weaker than in the other conditions.

    8. B

      Bar graph showing alpha lateralization index (0 to 0.06) for the 100%, 75%, and 50% cue reliability conditions. Alpha lateralization index significantly decreased with cue reliability percentage.

    9. C

      Standardized brain volume showing pre-stimulus alpha power sources as a contrast between t-values (-5 to 5) for attention to left hand and attention to right hand in the 100% condition. Pre-stimulus alpha power in sources from the right and left sensorimotor cortices showed significant lateralization such that t-scores were higher in the right somatosensory region during left hand attention and higher in the left somatosensory region during right hand attention.

    10. B

      Average frequency versus time for alpha power in sensors over right and left somatosensory regions in the 100% condition. Alpha power showed a sustained decrease during the prestimulus interval (t = -1 to 0 s). Left hemispheric sensors were mirrored to combine them with right-hemispheric sensors, which is why only attention left alpha power is shown in this plot.

    11. A

      Topographical plot showing pre-stimulus alpha power in sensors as a contrast between attention left and attention right (-0.06 to 0.06) in the 100% condition. Pre-stimulus alpha power in sensors over left and right somatosensory regions showed significant lateralization such that alpha power was higher in the right somatosensory region during the left trials and higher in the left somatosensory region during the right trials.

    12. B

      Discrimination rate (% correct) for valid and invalid cue trials in the 50%, 75%, and 100% cue reliability conditions, and reaction time (in ms) for valid and invalid cue trials in the 50%, 75%, and 100% cue reliability conditions.

    13. A

      Experimental procedure. Subjects were cued on which hand they should attend to using an arrow (0.2 s), presented with a pre-stimulus interval fixation cross (1.0-1.8 s), presented with an electrical target stimulus to the cued hand and an electrical distractor stimulus to the non-cued hand (0.24 s), presented with a fixation cross during which they performed the discrimination task (max 1.5 s), and then presented with a fixation cross that indicated whether or not they successfully performed the task (0.2 s).

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    1. Fig. 2

      Effect size, lower confidence interval, and upper confidence interval (with grand mean for each) for all studies analyzed (with experiment and grade for each) with Forest Plot of effect sizes.

    2. (c)

      five-point confidence judgment scale, from least to most confident.

    3. (b)

      three-point confidence judgment scale, from least to most confident.

    4. (a)

      Number that will be estimated and number line that will be used to estimate on number line estimation task.

    1. Figure 1

      Mean values of contrast thresholds for MC-biased and PC-biased stimuli in men and women. Contrast thresholds for the MC-biased stimuli were significantly lower than contrast thresholds for the PC-biased stimuli in both men and women.

    1. (k)

      Slope for visual search reaction time (measured in ms) in women (white) and men (black). No significant differences.

    2. (j)

      Visual search reaction time (measured in ms) in women (white) and men (black). No significant differences.

    3. (i)

      Threshold for which participants achieved 75% correct responses in identifying the orientation of a Gabor patch in women (white) and men (black). No significant differences.

    4. (h)

      % of correct interpretation for upright 800ms biological motion in females (white) and males (black). No significant differences.

    5. (g)

      % of correct interpretation for upright 200ms biological motion in females (white) and males (black). No significant differences.

    6. (f)

      % of correct interpretation for inverted 800ms biological motion in females (white) and males (black). Men had a significantly higher percentage of correctness than women at the p<0.05 level.

    7. (e)

      % of correct interpretation for inverted 200ms biological motion in females (white) and males (black). No significant differences.

    8. (d)

      % of coherent dots needed to detect motion direction for females (white) and males (black). Females needed significantly more dots to detect motion direction than males did at the p<0.05 level.

    9. (c)

      Contrast detection threshold for females (white) and males (black) measured in cd/m^2. No significant differences.

    10. (b)

      Reaction time on the Simon task for females (white) and males (black) measured in ms. No significant differences.

    11. (a)

      Reaction time on a simple reaction time task for females (white) and males (black) measured in ms. Females had significantly slower reaction time than males at the p<0.001 level.

    12. (c)

      Stimulus onset asynchrony time (measured in ms) to show 75% accuracy rate for the Vernier discrimination task with the 25 element mask in women (white) and men (black). Women needed a significantly longer SOA time than men to show a 75% accuracy rate (p<0.05).

    13. (d)

      Stimulus onset asynchrony time (measured in ms) to show 75% accuracy rate for the Vernier discrimination task with the 5 element mask in women (white) and men (black). Women needed a significantly longer SOA time than men to show a 75% accuracy rate (p<0.05).

    14. (b)

      Performance of females (white) and males (black) on the Vernier discrimination task (measured in ms). No significant difference.

    15. (a)

      Performance of females (white) and males (black) on the Freiberg visual acuity task (measured in decimals). Males performed significantly better on this task than females at the p<0.001 level.

    16. Figure 2

      The illusions that participants were tested on, including the Ebbinghaus illusion (EB), the Muller-Lyer illusion (ML), the Ponzo illusion (PZ), the Ponzo-hallway illusion (PZh), and the tilt illusion (TT). For each illusion, the participants were presented with two versions of the illusions that were different sizes (EB, PZh), lengths (ML, PZ), or orientations (TT), and were asked to alter one of the illusions to match the size, length, or orientation of the other illusion.

    17. (h)

      Simon task, which measured participants' difference in accuracy or reaction time between trials in which stimulus and response are congruent and trials in which they are incongruent.

    18. (g)

      Visual search task, which measured participants' ability to select a specific image within an array of similar images.

    19. (e)

      Contrast detection threshold task, which tests the participants' contrast detection threshold. Participants were presented with a red circle and then a green circle over time, and were told to indicate in which circle an image appeared.

    20. (d)

      Orientation discrimination task, which tests the participants' orientation discrimination ability.

    21. (f)

      Biological motion direction discrimination task for upright and inverted point-light walkers, which tests the participants' biological motion direction discrimination ability.

  3. May 2022
    1. (c)

      Freiburg visual acuity task, which tests the participants' visual acuity.

    2. (b)

      Visual backwards masking task, which tests the participants' visual backwards masking ability. First stimulus is shown, then an inter-stimulus interval (ISI; blank screen) is shown, then one of two second stimuli are shown.

    3. (a)

      Vernier duration task, which tests the participants' ability to detect a misalignment between visual stimuli.

    1. FIGuRE 6

      Comparison of fMRI and EEG imaging of activations from 0ms to 100ms and 100ms to 200ms using identical Talairach Z planes. Activation was very similar between the two (EEG confirms fMRI data).

    2. FIGuRE 5

      Visual depiction of significant brain activity recorded by EEG 0ms to 100ms following image presentation, 100ms to 200ms following image presentation, and 300ms to 400ms following image presentation. Activation for correct over incorrect tool use are shown in red, and activation for incorrect over correct tool use are shown in green.

    3. (C,D)

      EEG recordings of the left and right parietal regions of the brain showing ERPs (magnitude over time) when presented with images of contextually correct tool use, contextually incorrect tool use, and tools only. The first line represents when participants were presented with the cue, and the second line represents when participants were presented with the image. For both the right and left parietal regions, magnitude immediately following image presentation was significantly higher for incorrect tool use than for correct tool use and tools only, and magnitude at about 300ms to 400ms following image presentation was significantly lower for correct tool use than for incorrect tool use or tools only.

    4. (A,B)

      EEG recordings of the left and right temporal regions of the brain showing ERPs (magnitude over time) when presented with images of contextually correct tool use, contextually incorrect tool use, and tools only. The first line represents when participants were presented with the cue, and the second line represents when participants were presented with the image.

    5. FIGuRE 3

      fMRI images of brain areas significantly activated by comprehension of incorrect tool use (green) vs correct tool use (red) from different orientations (anterior, posterior, lateral (left), lateral (right), dorsal, and ventral).

    6. FIGuRE 2

      fMRI images of significant differences in brain activation for identifying correct tool use when compared to identifying tools alone (above), and identifying incorrect tool use when compared to identifying tools alone (below).

    7. (B)

      Participants were recorded using EEG for 2 15 m blocks with a 3m resting period between each block. During each block, participants were presented with twenty-five images of incorrect tool use (2s), twenty-five images of correct tool use (2s), and twenty-five images of tools alone (2s; control), with fixation crosses (4s to 6s) and a cue (500 ms) being presented before each image and fixation crosses (4s to 6s) being presented after each image.

    8. (A)

      Participants were recorded using fMRI for six 5m trials with 1m rest periods between each trial. During each trial, participants were presented with eight images of correct tool use (2s), eight images of incorrect tool use (2s), and eight images of tools alone (2s; control), with fixation crosses presented between each image (6s to 8s).

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  4. Mar 2022
    1. (f)

      Paired-pulse facilitation did not yield significant differences between groups.

    2. (e)

      Input/output curve plotting EPSP slope against presynaptic fiber volleys. fEPSP slopes were significantly different for the juv-adol ELE and adol ELE mice but not for the juv ELE mice when compared to controls.

    3. (d)

      input/output curve plotting presynaptic fiber volleys against stimulus intensity showed a main effect of ELE group, main effect of stimulus intensity, and significant interaction between ELE group and stimulus intensity.

    4. (c)

      input/output curve plotting EPSP slope against stimulus intensity showed a main effect of ELE group, effect of stimulus intensity, and significant interaction between ELE group and stimulus intensity. fEPSP slopes were significantly higher for the juv ELE and juv-adol ELE mice but not for the adol ELE mice when compared to controls.

    5. (a)

      LTP significantly increased in response to theta burst stimulation for juv-adol ELE mice, but not for juv ELE or adol ELE mice in comparison with controls.

    6. (b)

      Enhanced LTP in juv-adol ELE mice lasted for 50-60 minutes following the theta burst stimulation, significantly more than it did for controls.

    7. (i)

      There were no significant differences between any groups of male and female mice in terms of total time spent exploring objects.

    8. (h)

      In male mice, juv-adol ELE mice and juv ELE mice showed a significantly higher preference for the object placed in the novel location when compared to no ELE mice and adol ELE mice. In female mice, juv ELE mice showed a significantly higher preference for the object placed in the novel location when compared to no ELE mice, juv ELE mice, and juv-adol ELE mice. All male ELE mice demonstrated significant object preference from acquisition to testing when compared with male no ELE mice. Female juv ELE and juv-adol ELE mice demonstrated significant object preference from acquisition to testing when compared with female adol ELE mice and no ELE mice.

    9. (g)

      The 3 min OLM acquisition task did not result in significant object discrimination (object preference) in any groups of mice, regardless of sex. 3 min-trained, sedentary male and female mice demonstrated significantly lower object discrimination than 10 min-trained, ELE male and female mice.

    10. (f)

      There were no significant differences between any groups of male and female mice in terms of total time spent exploring objects.

    11. (e)

      For all groups of male and female mice, a 5 min OLM testing task 24 h after the 10 min OLM acquisition task resulted in significant object discrimination (object preference) for the object placed in the novel location. No group demonstrated discrimination for the novel object significantly more than any other group.

    12. (d)

      The 10 min OLM acquisition task did not result in significant object discrimination (object preference) in any groups of mice, regardless of sex.

    13. (b,c)

      For both male and female mice, distance traveled significantly decreased over the six OLM trials, indicating that the mice were habituated to the OLM chambers.

    14. (a)

      Two groups of mice did an object location memory (OLM) task for either 3 or 10 minutes, and then all mice did that same task again for 5 minutes 24 hours later with one of the objects moved to a different location.

    15. (c–e)

      All mice in the juv-adol ELE group, juv ELE group, and adol ELE group significantly increased their running distances during the three week exercise period.

    16. (f–h)

      In the juv-adol ELE group, the juv ELE group, and the adol ELE group, there were no significant differences in distance ran between male and female mice.

    17. (b)

      In male mice, the juv ELE group gained significantly more weight than the juv-adol ELE group. In female mice, the stationary group gained significantly more weight than the sedentary group, the juv-adol ELE group, and the adol ELE group.

    18. (a)

      Young male and female mice were split into four groups over a period of three weeks. One group of mice was sedentary from the first to the third week (sed), one exercised for the first week (juv ELE), one exercised from the first to the third week (juv-adol ELE), and one group of mice exercised for the third week (adol ELE). After this, all mice were either tested for object location memory or sacrificed for electrophysiology.

    1. (B)

      The group that was administered oxytocin was significantly less likely to sacrifice an in-group member than an out-group member when compared with the group that was administered placebo.

    2. . (A)

      The group that was administered oxytocin was significantly less likely to sacrifice an in-group member than an out-group member when compared with the group that was administered placebo.

    3. Fig. 2

      Both groups associated uniquely human emotions with in-group members more frequently than with outgroup members, but the oxytocin group associated uniquely human emotions with in-group members more frequently than with outgroup members significantly more than the placebo group.

    4. {A)

      In experiment 1, both in-group regard and out-group disregard were significantly higher for the group administered oxytocin than for the group administered placebo.

    5. (B)

      In experiment 2, in-group regard was significantly higher for the group administered oxytocin than for the group administered placebo. Out-group disregard was not significantly different between groups.

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  5. Feb 2022
  6. Jan 2022
    1. Figure 1. Autocratic leadership transitions, 1946 to 2014.

      peaceful vs. unpeaceful power transitions:

      From 1946 to 2014, only 44 percent of autocratic leadership transitions were peaceful and resulted in the continuation of the regime after the departure of the incumbent.

  7. Sep 2021
  8. Jul 2021
  9. Jun 2021
    1. Angelo: No, it's actually the very first time that I've been able to tell this without actually crying or anything like that because I don't want to embarrass myself or anything. Yes, it's very literally very hard. Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, right now my kids are in birthday season—my kids literally have birthdays back to back. So I mean, it's literally hard. My first Christmas here, I had no idea it was already Christmas until I saw lights. So, I literally just stood in front of them where I was staying—I was staying with my uncles—and I just stared at the lights and just broke down. And there's many times where that happens to me. There's a car that I used to have, or let's say McDonald's or any little thing, a pretty park—I walk by a pretty park—and I just picture my kids. So, it's very difficult mainly because of my kids. That's all I wanted to be, a father. I want to say that I gave them everything. And it's just very hard not being able to, for all that work to just be taken away just like that.Isabel: Yeah. I mean especially when you're saying like being a father, being a good father and talking about not being able to forgive your own father for the way that he treated your mother, being able to rise from that, to be the man that you want to be. Not having that figure as a father, like knowing you don't want to replicate that.Angelo: Exactly.Isabel: And the cruel irony of then still be pictured as that person that you never wanted to be.Angelo: Exactly. And that was my main goal, just like you said it, that was the perfect words. I wanted to be someone that my father was never to me and to my family. So, I said “I'm going to be the best father,” and I want to say that I was, but it just got taken away. It's very hard because my kids right now, they stay with their grandparents—they don't have a father. I think to myself on Father's Day at school, what are they making? Who are they giving the projects to? My oldest son, he remembers me.Isabel: You mentioned that your return to Mexico was very difficult, you had a lot of struggles, like all the alcoholism, also finding a job, socially. Do you mind just going into some of the obstacles you ran into on your return?Angelo: On my return to Mexico, my very first day here in Mexico, I spent the night in on the border, in Tamaulipas, Mexico. And literally I didn't want to do anything else. The very first thing I did was go to a store, and I bought a beer and I asked the lady at the store, "Will I get in trouble if I walk around the streets with the beer?" And she said, "You'll be fine. You have two or 300 pesos, right?" I said, "Yeah I just came back from the United States, I have money." “You'll be fine, if somebody pulls you over, just give them that and you'll be completely fine. “So that was the very first thing I did getting here to Mexico. There's so much alcoholism in my family that when I got here in Mexico, I said, "Okay, well it's in my blood. Let's go for it." And literally there will be times where I would just go out and buy a vodka bottle and go to my room, buy some orange juice and just literally drink until I passed out. And that went on for about half a year until one day, I guess I got really sick. I had the hiccups a lot that three or four in the morning, I was making too much noise.Angelo: I literally do not remember this, but there were people banging on my door trying to get in. Nobody was able to get in, they had to break the door down. And from what they told me, I was just in a corner and just literally choking on myself, with so much hiccups that, and I was just [inaudible]. The next morning and everybody sat down with me, and they literally—Isabel: Who’s everybody?Angelo: My uncles. I was staying at my uncle's house, so my uncle's family sat down with me, my cousins, and they had to pull me straight. They literally said, “You're not right.” They didn't talk to me too much because just them saying “You're not all right,” it clicked into my head that it was a very, very, very first time that I blacked out drinking, the very, very first time. So I told myself, "How do you not remember this happening? How do you not remember any of this? Or why are they telling you this? What did you do?" And I just saw my father all over again, and that was it, that's when I stopped drinking on the daily.Angelo: Yes. Because depression is a big part of my life. In the United States, I got diagnosed with bipolar depression, so there's just times where one time I could be happy, and then I think of something and literally my world ends. So getting here to Mexico, that was my escape, that was my answer, that was my... I can't say it wasn't the answer because for me my goal was to destroy myself, my goal was to get mugged in the middle of the street. There would be times where I literally walked around the state of Mexico three, four in the morning, just in the middle of the street, just looking for trouble. I wanted somebody to find me, I wanted somebody to…you know, all these dangerous streets that people were telling me, I wanted that, I don't know, I wanted to just destroy myself.Angelo: I wanted to get beaten down, I wanted for something bad to happen, and it was very hard. So whenever they had to break down the door, it was a big eye opener because they had to call my mom, and my mom did not know any of this. And my mom's a very big important part of my life, even over there she would always help me with stuff. She would always run around with me, she would always go shopping with me if I needed anything for my kids, she was always right there, if I needed babysitter, she was always right there. So whenever they had to call my mom, and they told her, "You know what, your son is doing this" [Emotional]. That brought so much shame to me, and that's when I said, I told my mom, "I'm sorry, I'm not going to do what my father did, so I'm done." And that was it. That's when I said, "I'm not going to do this again to my mom."

      Return to Mexico, Challenges, family separation, mental health, Family relationships, feelings, sadness, disappointment, frustration, despair

  10. May 2021
  11. Apr 2021
    1. Ultimately, Shelter Generations relies on your capacity to dig into its subtleties. On that overt level it's an obtuse and obviously indie game, and it's really quite demanding of the player; it asks them to figure their own way through the game, and it asks them to really commit to an emotional connection to these hopeless little cubs.
  12. Mar 2021
    1. I'm kinda stuck at the moment, going around in circles. Everything is really heavily coupled. I would like to get to the point where no load is called from within processors, but i'm not sure if that's possible. Currently the API and the caching strategies are fighting me at every step of the way. I have a branch where i'm hacking through some refactoring, no light at the end of the tunnel yet though :(
    1. it's super hard to test master because i have no idea which gems need to be updated. is there a guide on how to take a rails 4.2 project to master sprockets without everything mysteriously exploding? ill try to make a repro case but its hard to tell where to even start
    1. (A) Optical image of the undeformed device (left) and the FEA model for simulation (right). Optical images and max principal strain contours of the multifunctional wearable electronics being uniaxially stretched by 60% along vertical direction (B), along horizontal direction (C), and being biaxially stretched by 30% (D). (E) ECG data of the same device under different deformation modes. Photo credit: Chuanqian Shi, University of Colorado, Boulder.

      (A) Model of the device without any stress/strain (left) and Finite element analysis model of the wearable device, not deformed (right). The model to the right exhibits the components inside the device. (B-C) The model shown being stretched 60%, vertically and horizontally respectively, show the maximum strain of the chip being 0.01%. This is much less than the normal failure strain for silicon (1%). (D) This figure shows the FMEA model being stretched 30% vertically and horizontally. The maximum strain in the chip components is below 0.004%. (E) Figure shows sensing performance of device when being stretched using an ECG. No significant effects from the mechanical stretching where evident in the results.

  13. Feb 2021
    1. (A) Schematic illustration of the fabrication processes of the multifunctional wearable electronics. (B) Motion tracking performance with the multifunctional device worn on the wrist. (C) Indoor and outdoor body temperatures acquired using the wearable electronics mounted on the forehead (top) and comparison of measured indoor body temperatures when the wearable electronics is mounted at different locations (bottom). (D) Acoustic data acquired using the wearable electronics mounted on the neck. (E) ECG data acquired using the wearable electronics when the participant is at rest (top), and after exercising for 13 s (middle) and 34 s (bottom). Photo credit: Chuanqian Shi, University of Colorado, Boulder.

      (A) Step-by-step process of each layer of the device to allow multiple functionalities and wearability. (B) Amplitude vs. Time graph of sensor worn on the wrist to measure motion when walking, running, jumping. (C) Thermal sensor can read forehead, abdomen, and hand temperature on skin when indoor and outdoor over time. (D) The acoustic sensor is placed on the neck to measure the amplitude (vibration) characteristics of the vocal chords to serve as a human-machine interface. (E) The electrocardiogram sensor measures heart activity while resting, after exercising for 13 seconds and then after 34 seconds. The heart rate resulted in 72, 96, and 114 per minute, respectively.

    2. (A) Schematic illustration of a multifunctional wearable electronic system mounted on the hand, which integrates ECG, acoustic, motion, and temperature sensing capabilities. (B) Exploded view of the multifunctional wearable electronics. (C) Optical images of the multifunctional device being crumpled on the skin, bended, twisted, and stretched. (D) Schematic illustration of the dynamic covalent thermoset polyimine: polymerization and depolymerization and bond exchange reaction induced bond breaking and reforming. (E) Schematic illustration of self-healing and recycling of the multifunctional wearable electronics.

      The sensing components of the device being worn on the hand are ECG, acoustic, motion, and temperature sensors. It incorporates an electrocardiogram to measure heart activity using amplifiers and resistors to calculate the voltage versus time using electrodes placed on the skin. Assembling the sensors with EGaIn alloy to connect the sensor electronics and polyimine films allows the device to possess its’ flexibility and stretchability. Using polyimine allows for the breaking and reforming of bonds to allow self-healing, and polymerization and depolymerization to recycle the product.

  14. Oct 2020
    1. Red and black lines represent results for the modeled andmeasured daily-scale values, respectively, while blue and green represent results for the modeledand measured instantaneous-scale values, respectively.

      In both figure S1 and S2 there are no red or blue lines. adding these colors as written in the text would let the plots more readable

    1. values of the radiation stress gradients (f)

      plot f) of the radiation stress gradients is missing

    2. Density (a), salinity (b) and temperature (c) distributions along the bay transect

      It is straightforward from figures title but the a, b and c references of the figures are missing. As in line 206 the C of Celsius degree is missing in the temperature plot.

    3. Wave (d) and wind (e) roses at thestudy site

      What is the reference period of wave and wind data shown here? Is it the same period of the model simulations? Is the percentage shown representing the percentage of time in which those conditions are present considering the entire observation time? I suggest to add these information in the text.

    4. Location of study site, dashed blue line corresponds to the contour of the meshof the Cadiz Bay

      I can't see the dashed blue line in figure 1a

    5. Panel d) shows thenon-dimensional humidity (blue), solar radiation (red), rainfall (yellow) and evaporation (purple)

      This is the same caption of figure 3. It must be changed with wave height and Direction.

    6. Density (a), salinity (b) and temperature (c) variations along the bay transectwhen waves are considere

      Same issue of figure 3. the letter references in the plot are missing

    1. Relative contributions from winds and thermal forcing

      I find this section very convincing!

      One additional suggestion, still. What do the sea ice area export curves look like in the FESOM simulations? I am assuming that if you were to look at area export (function of ice drift and ice concentration), you would get a similar picture to Fig. 3c - i.e.: slightly positive trends, with the variability almost entirely explained by winds. Is it possible to show that (additional panel in Fig. 3)? I believe it would bring yet an another argument supporting that the long term trend in volume export has to be thickness driven.

    2. nnual mean sea level pressure

      Why not calculate correlations with SLP over land? There might be some interesting connections when thinking about high pressure systems above Greenland?

    3. Annual mean sea ice volume export

      This is the annual mean anomaly with respect to the 1992-2014 mean, is that correct? Maybe precise this in the legend.

    4. Results

      Please precise the definition of the Fram Strait used for producing the results. Is it a line of constant latitude (82°N)? Or a straight line between Greenland and Svalbard?

      The Fram Strait gate could also be illustrated on the map of averaged thickness and sea ice drift I suggested above.

    5. FESOM has a decent performance in simulating Arctic sea ice extent and133thickness in comparison with other state-of-the-art global ocean models

      More precision on how FESOM simulates sea ice should be included. Are there any know biases?

      Also, I think a useful additional figure would be a map of averaged thickness and sea ice drift over the 2001-2019 period for the control run (a figure similar to Fig. 1a in Min et al. (2019)).

    6. sea ice can be reasonably simulated compared to observations

      My comment above applies here - a map of averaged ice thickness and sea ice drift over the 2001-2019 period would be very useful in supporting this point.

  15. Sep 2020
  16. Aug 2020
  17. Jul 2020
  18. May 2020
  19. Apr 2020
  20. Mar 2020