542 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Dilemma: Do I use this unofficial library with its really nice idiomatic API or the official library (https://github.com/mailgun/mailgun-ruby) with its inferior API?

      I wish this one was still/better maintained because I'd much rather use this API, like: @mailgun.lists.create "devs@your.mailgun.domain" @mailgun.lists.list @mailgun.lists.find "devs@your.mailgun.domain"

      but it's not maintained, and looks like it doesn't have the word events in the source at all, so it's missing any way to use the Events API. :(

    1. 11/30 Youth Collaborative

      I went through some of the pieces in the collection. It is important to give a platform to the voices that are missing from the conversation usually.

      Just a few similar initiatives that you might want to check out:

      Storycorps - people can record their stories via an app

      Project Voice - spoken word poetry

      Living Library - sharing one's story

      Freedom Writers - book and curriculum based on real-life stories

  2. Nov 2022
  3. 6291320.fs1.hubspotusercontent-na1.net 6291320.fs1.hubspotusercontent-na1.net
    1. We find favorwith Mortimer J. Adler’s stance, from 1940,that “marking up a book is not an act ofmutilation but of love.”18

      also:

      Full ownership of a book only comes when you have made it a part of yourself, and the best way to make yourself a part of it—which comes to the same thing—is by writing in it. —Adler, Mortimer J., and Charles Van Doren. How to Read a Book. Revised and Updated edition. 1940. Reprint, New York: Simon & Schuster, 1972.

      They also suggest that due to the relative low cost of books, it's easier to justify writing in them, though they carve out an exception for the barbarism of scribbling in library books.

    1. Until now, we had a lot of code. Although we were using a plugin to help with boilerplate code, ready endpoints, and webpages for sign in/sign up management, a lot of adaptations were necessary. This is when Doorkeeper comes to the rescue. It is not only an OAuth 2 provider for Rails but also a full OAuth 2 suite for Ruby and related frameworks (Sinatra, Devise, MongoDB, support for JWT, and more).
    1. Genealogy Garage: Researching at the Huntington Library

      <iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/0f2j2K6JWGg" title="YouTube video player" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe>
      • Julie Huffman jhuffman@lapl.org (host)
      • Stephanie Arias
      • Anne Blecksmith
      • Li Wei Yang
      • Clay Stalls cstalls@huntington.org

      ECPP

      Huntington Library

      Visit checklist

    1. For eight years, the US Library of Congress took it upon itself to maintain a public record of all tweets, but it stopped in 2018, instead selecting only a small number of accounts’ posts to capture.  “It never, ever worked,” says William Kilbride, executive director of the Digital Preservation Coalition. The data the library was expected to store was too vast, the volume coming out of the firehose too great. “Let me put that in context: it’s the Library of Congress. They had some of the best expertise on this topic. If the Library of Congress can’t do it, that tells you something quite important,” he says.

      Library of Congress' role in archiving twitter

    1. Although complicated, Gen Z’s relationship with data privacy should be a consideration for brands when strategizing their data privacy policies and messaging for the future. Expectations around data privacy are shifting from something that sets companies apart in consumers’ minds to something that people expect the same way one might expect a service or product to work as advertised. For Gen Zers, this takes the form of skepticism that companies will keep their data safe, and their reluctance to give companies credit for getting it right means that good data privacy practices will increasingly be more about maintaining trust than building it.

      Gen-Z expectations are complicated

      The Gen-Z generation have notably different expectations about data privacy than previous generations. "Libraries" wasn't among the industry that showed up in their survey results. That Gen-Z expects privacy built in makes that factor a less differentiating characteristic as compared to older generations. It might also be harder to get trust back from members of the Gen-Z population if libraries surprise those users with data handling practices that they didn't expect.

    1. I agree that these fields should be whitelisted by ActiveAdmin automatically as it generates them via the form helpers. Regardless of if you use :raise or :log you wouldn't usually want these causing unnecessary noise.
  4. Oct 2022
    1. It is possible this Miscellany collection was assembled by Schutz as part of his own research as an historian, as well as the letters and documents collected as autographs for his interest as a collector;

      https://catalog.huntington.org/record=b1792186

      Is it possible that this miscellany collection is of a zettelkasten nature?

      Found via a search of the Huntington Library for Frederic L. Paxson's zettelkasten

    1. Frederick Jackson Turner died in 1932 in Pasadena, California,[1] where he had been a research associate at the Huntington Library.
    2. Turner was never comfortable at Harvard; when he retired in 1922 he became a visiting scholar at the Huntington Library in Los Angeles, where his note cards and files continued to accumulate, although few monographs got published. His The Frontier in American History (1920) was a collection of older essays.

      Where did Turner's note cards and files end up? Are they housed at the Huntington Library? What other evidence or indication is there that this was an extensive zettelkasten practice here?

    1. A Midwestern hospital system is treating its use of Google and Facebook web tracking technologies as a data breach, notifying 3 million individuals that the computing giants may have obtained patient information.

      Substitute “library” for “hospital”

      In an alternate universe: “A Midwestern library system is treating its use of Google and Facebook web tracking technologies as a data breach, notifying 3 million individuals that the computing giants may have obtained search and borrowing histories.”

    1. academic law libraries pool resources, through a consortium, to create a centralizedcollection of legal materials, including copyrighted materials, and to digitize thosematerials for easy, cost-effective access by all consortium members. For the sake ofexpediency, this proposal will be referred to here as TALLO (Taking Academic LawLibraries Online) and the proposed consortium as the TALLO consortium.

      Coining "TALLO" (Taking Academic Law

      Libraries Online)

      The [[Controlled Digital Lending]] theory was first proposed as a way for academic law libraries to form a consortium to share the expense of collection-building.

    1. Scholem’s, given their own reading room at the National Library of Israel.

      Hebrew University Jewish mysticism scholar Gershom Scholem's zettelkasten has its own reading room at the National Library of Israel.

      Gershom Scholem (1897-1982)

    1. Portion of a hand-written card file listing manuscripts, documents, and portraits contained in the Boston Public Library's Chamberlain Collection of Autographs. Cards are organized by last name of the creator or subject. Names of persons who have signed documents are also listed.
  5. Sep 2022
    1. By the way, Luhmann's system is said to have had 35.000 cards. Jules Verne had 25.000. The sixteenth-century thinker Joachim Jungius is said to have had 150.000, and how many Leibniz had, we do not know, though we do know that he had one of the most ingenious piece of furniture for keeping his copious notes.

      Circa late 2011, he's positing Luhmann had 35,000 cards and not 90,000.

      Jules Verne used index cards. Joachim Jungius is said to have had 150,000 cards.

    1. But the library? In this country, they’re oases in a desert of social infrastructure. In many regions they’re more than functional, people rely on them. It’s part of their routine. It’s a safe haven for anyone, literally anyone, to use.

      Libraries are community centers, public infrastructure. Vgl the networked agency work with Fers regional libraries in Fryslan "Impact Through Connection" https://www.zylstra.org/blog/2017/03/more-fun-than-annual-class-trip-making-at-school-some-first-observations/

    2. Almost all the jobs I had before and after that have felt abstract, distant from people’s real problems. They’ve involved me having to convince myself that the work was important and that it was making an impact. When I’m theorizing and organizing for the “digital commons,” I constantly questioned myself if I was making the right kind of interventions. If the things I’m fighting for — platform co-operatives, community networks, digital research and cultural archives, Free and Open Source projects — will ever become so full-fledged as to help us confront the planetary crisis that lies ahead of us.  At the library, I wasn’t fighting for a future that I wanted to manifest, I was standing in it. All the books that passed through my hands, the kindergarteners that sang along with me during story time, the patrons who gleefully placed an item in front of me to be checked out. I’d never seen so many grateful people day to day, week to week. The high you get from helping someone find exactly what they were looking for, is right there on the shelf (and they don’t need to pay for it because it’s already theirs!). There’s seriously nothing else like it.

      Direct gratitude from library readers vs impact of organisational work in the face of climate urgency seems an asymmetrical comparison. Recognisable though. Perhaps 'bullshit job' feelings come from working immersed in bureaucratic/process logic while aiming to change it, whereas the joy comes from being immersed in human logic of work ('the high of...'). Vgl. [[Logica van bureaucratie vs mensen 20220813074112]] Does this help me [[Het Reboot gevoel vaker hebben 20161023145654]]? Phrasing it as injecting human logic into a place where process logic is otherwise dominant?

  6. Aug 2022
    1. The narrator considers this as vandalism and finds it hard to believe how anyone "educated enough to have access to a university library should do this to a book." To him "the treatment of books is a test of civilized behaviour."

      Highlighted portion is a quote from Kuehn sub-quoting David Lodge, Deaf Sentence (New York: Viking 2008)

      Ownership is certainly a factor here, but given how inexpensive many books are now, if you own it, why not mark it up? See also: Mortimer J. Adler's position on this.


      Marking up library books is a barbarism; not marking up your own books is a worse sin.

    1. While the admin-istrative scientist Luhmann ignores the librarian’s dictum in his consideration of theproper paper for the project out of spatial concerns, DIN 1504, which, apart from theInternational Library Format, only allows DIN A 6 and DIN A 7 for “literature cards,”18regrettably goes unused.

      Despite his career as an administrative scientist, Luhmann eschewed the International Library Format which allows for DIN A6 and DIN A7 for "literature cards."

      Cross reference:

      1. See Deutsches Institut für Normung e.V. (DIN), Publikation und Dokumentation 2. Erschließung von Dokumenten, Informationsverarbeitung, Reprographie, Bibliotheksverwaltung, Normen, vol. 154 of DIN-Taschenbuch , 2nd ed. (Berlin, Kö ln: Beuth, 1984), 64f.

      link to https://hypothes.is/a/hKgd_t1jEeyxoxOujPZNkg

    1. Während es schon im ersten Jahrzehnt des 20. Jahrhunderts Pläne für eine weitereRationalisierung der Katalogisierung durch die Einführung des Zetteldruck derpreußischen (wissenschaftlichen) Bibliotheken gab, entstand ab 1919 auf der Seiteder öffentlichen Bibliotheken die „deutsche Büchereihandschrift“.Die von Erwin Ackerknecht entworfene Schreibanleitung diente primär dazu,noch handschriftlich geführten Katalogen ein einheitliches, leserliches Schriftbildzu geben. Als Ausgangsschrift wählte er von daher die „Latein-Schreibschrift“,die im Gegensatz zur damals gebräuchlichen Sütterlin-Kurrentschrift leichter zulesen war.

      Machine translation (Google):

      While there were already plans in the first decade of the 20th century for a further rationalization of cataloging by introducing label printing in the Prussian (academic) libraries, from 1919 the “German library handwriting” was created on the part of the public libraries. The writing instructions designed by Erwin Ackerknecht primarily served to give handwritten catalogs a uniform, legible typeface. He therefore chose the “Latin cursive” as his starting script, which was easier to read than the Sütterlin cursive script that was common at the time.

    2. Ackerknecht, Erwin: Deutsche Büchereihandschrift: mit 21 Tafeln. - 3. Aufl., Berlin1948.
    1. theGerman library handwriting style invented by E. Ackerknecht is recommended in order toensure equal handwriting style.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Erwin_Ackerknecht<br /> Influential historian of medicine

      <ins datetime="2022-08-24T15:44:48+00:00"> Erwin Heinz Ackerknecht (1 June 1906, in Stettin – 18 November 1988, in Zurich), the historian of medicine, did some library related work, but didn't invent this handwriting style, his father Erwin Julius Ackerknecht did. see: https://de.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Erwin_Ackerknecht</ins>


      What does this handwriting style look like?

    1. Politique documentaire Ensemble des objectifs et processus pilotant la gestion de l’information, incluant la politique d’acquisition, la politique de conservation et la politique de médiation des collections. La politique documentaire est une partie intégrante et essentielle du projet d'établissement, permettant de répondre aux missions de la structure et aux attentes des usagers.
    1. OCLC began automated catalog card production in 1971, when the shared cataloging system first went online. Cardproduction increased to its peak in 1985, when OCLC printed 131 million. At peak production, OCLC routinelyshipped 8 tons of cards each week, or some 4,000 packages. Card production steadily decreased since then asmore and more libraries began replacing their printed cards with electronic catalogs. OCLC has printed more than1.9 billion catalog cards since 1971.
    2. DUBLIN, Ohio, October 1, 2015 —OCLC printed its last library catalog cards today, officially closing the book onwhat was once a familiar resource for generations of information seekers who now use computer catalogs andonline search engines to access library collections around the world.
  7. Jul 2022
    1. Because I wanted to make use of a unified version of the overall universe of knowledge as a structural framework, I ended up using the Outline of Knowledge (OoK) in the Propædia volume that was part of Encyclopedia Britannica 15th edition, first published 1974, the final version of which (2010) is archived at -- where else? -- the Internet Archive.

      The Outline of Knowledge appears in the Propædia volume of the Encyclopedia Britannica. It is similar to various olther classification systems like the Dewey Decimal system or the Universal Decimal Classification.

    1. https://collectionbuilder.github.io/

      CollectionBuilder is a set of flexible, static web templates for creating digital collection websites. These templates are driven by metadata and powered by modern static web technology. Using three primary components—a spreadsheet of metadata, a directory of assets, and a configuration file—CollectionBuilder helps users to build and customize sustainable, digital collections and exhibits for free, learning valuable development practices in the process.

    1. https://udcsummary.info/php/index.php?lang=en

      Interesting defined vocabulary and concatenation/auxiliary signs for putting ideas into proximity.

      Could be useful for note taking. Probably much harder to get people to adopt this sort of thing with shared notes/note taking however.

      Somewhat similar to the Dewey Decimal classification system.

    1. Create a new controller to override the original: app/controllers/active_storage/blobs_controller.rb

      Original comment:

      I've never seen monkey patching done quite like this.

      Usually you can't just "override" a class. You can only reopen it. You can't change its superclass. (If you needed to, you'd have to remove the old constant first.)

      Rails has already defined ActiveStorage::BlobsController!

      I believe the only reason this works:

      class ActiveStorage::BlobsController < ActiveStorage::BaseController

      is because it's reopening the existing class. We don't even need to specify the < Base class. (We can't change it, in any case.)

      They do the same thing here: - https://github.com/ackama/rails-template/pull/284/files#diff-2688f6f31a499b82cb87617d6643a0a5277dc14f35f15535fd27ef80a68da520

      Correction: I guess this doesn't actually monkey patch it. I guess it really does override the original from activestorage gem and prevent it from getting loaded. How does it do that? I'm guessing it's because activestorage relies on autoloading constants, and when the constant ActiveStorage::BlobsController is first encountered/referenced, autoloading looks in paths in a certain order, and finds the version in the app's app/controllers/active_storage/blobs_controller.rb before it ever gets a chance to look in the gem's paths for that same path/file.

      If instead of using autoloading, it had used require_relative (or even require?? but that might have still found the app-defined version earlier in the load path), then it would have loaded the model from activestorage first, and then (possibly) loaded the model from our app, which (probably) would have reopened it, as I originally commented.

    1. meat: https://github.com/musaffa/file_validators/blob/master/lib/file_validators/validators/file_content_type_validator.rb

      Compared to https://github.com/aki77/activestorage-validator, I slightly prefer this because - it has more users and has been battle tested more - is more flexible: can specify exclude as well as allow - has more expansive Readme documentation - is mentioned by https://github.com/thoughtbot/paperclip/blob/master/MIGRATING.md#migrating-from-paperclip-to-activestorage - mentions security: whether or not it's needed, at least this makes extra attempt to be secure by using external tool to check content_type; https://github.com/aki77/activestorage-validator/blob/master/lib/activestorage/validator/blob.rb just uses blob.content_type, which I guess just trusts whatever ActiveStorage gives us (which seems fair too: perhaps this should be kicked up to them to be their concern)

      In fact, it looks like ActiveStorage does do some kind of mime type checking...

      activestorage-6.1.6/app/models/active_storage/blob/identifiable.rb ``` def identify_without_saving unless identified? self.content_type = identify_content_type self.identified = true end end

      def identify_content_type
        Marcel::MimeType.for download_identifiable_chunk, name: filename.to_s, declared_type: content_type
      end
      

      ```

    1. https://www.zylstra.org/blog/2022/06/spring-83/

      I've been thinking about this sort of thing off and on myself.

      I too almost immediately thought of Fraidyc.at and its nudge at shifting the importance of content based on time and recency. I'd love to have a social reader with additional affordances for both this time shifting and Ton's idea of reading based on social distance.

      I'm struck by the seemingly related idea of @peterhagen's LindyLearn platform and annotations: https://annotations.lindylearn.io/new/ which focuses on taking some of the longer term interesting ideas as the basis for browsing and chewing on. Though even here, one needs some of the odd, the cutting edge, and the avant garde in their balanced internet diet. Would Spring '83 provide some of this?

      I'm also struck by some similarities this has with the idea of Derek Siver's /now page movement. I see some updating regularly while others have let it slip by the wayside. Still the "board" of users exists, though one must click through a sea of mostly smiling and welcoming faces to get to it the individual pieces of content. (The smiling faces are more inviting and personal than the cacophony of yelling and chaos I see in models for Spring '83.) This reminds me of Stanley Meyers' frequent assertion that he attempted to design a certain "sense of quiet" into the early television show Dragnet to balance the seeming loudness of the everyday as well as the noise of other contemporaneous television programming.

      The form reminds me a bit of the signature pages of one's high school year book. But here, instead of the goal being timeless scribbles, one has the opportunity to change the message over time. Does the potential commercialization of the form (you know it will happen in a VC world crazed with surveillance capitalism) follow the same trajectory of the old college paper facebook? Next up, Yearbook.com!

      Beyond the thing as a standard, I wondered what the actual form of Spring '83 adds to a broader conversation? What does it add to the diversity of voices that we don't already see in other spaces. How might it be abused? Would people come back to it regularly? What might be its emergent properties?

      It definitely seems quirky and fun in and old school web sort of way, but it also stresses me out looking at the zany busyness of some of the examples of magazine stands. The general form reminds me of the bargain bins at book stores which have the promise of finding valuable hidden gems and at an excellent price, but often the ideas and quality of what I find usually isn't worth the discounted price and the return on investment is rarely worth the effort. How might this get beyond these forms?

      It also brings up the idea of what other online forms we may have had with this same sort of raw experimentation? How might the internet have looked if there had been a bigger rise of the wiki before that of the blog? What would the world be like if Webmention had existed before social media rose to prominence? Did we somehow miss some interesting digital animals because the web rose so quickly to prominence without more early experimentation before its "Cambrian explosion"?

      I've been thinking about distilled note taking forms recently and what a network of atomic ideas on index cards look like and what emerges from them. What if the standard were digital index cards that linked and cross linked to each other, particularly in a world without adherence to time based orders and streams? What does a new story look like if I can pull out a card either at random or based on a single topic and only see it or perhaps some short linked chain of ideas (mine or others) which come along with it? Does the choice of a random "Markov monkey" change my thinking or perspective? What comes out of this jar of Pandora? Is it just a new form of cadavre exquis?

      This standard has been out for a bit and presumably folks are experimenting with it. What do the early results look like? How are they using it? Do they like it? Does it need more scale? What do small changes make to the overall form?


      For more on these related ideas, see: https://hypothes.is/search?q=tag%3A%22spring+%2783%22

  8. Jun 2022
    1. Thus began a lifelong relationship with her commonplace books.Butler would scrape together twenty-five cents to buy small Meadmemo pads, and in those pages she took notes on every aspect ofher life: grocery and clothes shopping lists, last-minute to-dos,wishes and intentions, and calculations of her remaining funds forrent, food, and utilities. She meticulously tracked her daily writinggoals and page counts, lists of her failings and desired personalqualities, her wishes and dreams for the future, and contracts she

      would sign with herself each day for how many words she committed to write.

      Not really enough evidence for a solid quote here. What was his source?

      He cites the following shallowly: <br /> - Octavia E. Butler, Bloodchild and Other Stories: Positive Obsession (New York: Seven Stories, 2005), 123–36.<br /> - 2 Lynell George, A Handful of Earth, A Handful of Sky: The World of Octavia Butler (Santa Monica: Angel City Press, 2020).<br /> - 3 Dan Sheehan, “Octavia Butler has finally made the New York Times Best Seller list,” LitHub.com, September 3, 2020, https://lithub.com/octavia- butler-has-finally-made-the-new-york-times-best-seller-list/.<br /> - 4 Butler’s archive has been available to researchers and scholars at the Huntington Library since 2010.

    1. Before we begin, please note that this piece assumes intermediate familiarity with Zettelkasten and its original creator, the social scientist Niklas Luhmann (1927–1998).

      Even the long running (2013) zettelkasten.de website credits Niklas Luhmann as being the "original creator" of the zettelkasten.

      sigh

      We really need to track down the origin of linking one idea to another. Obviously writers, and especially novelists, would have had some sort of at least linear order in their writing due to narrative needs in using such a system. What does this tradition look like on the non-fiction side?

      Certainly some of the puzzle stems from the commonplace book tradition, but this is more likely to have relied on natural memory as well as searching and finding via index methods.

      Perhaps looking more closely at Hans Blumenberg's instantiation would be more helpful. Similarly looking at the work of Claude Lévi-Strauss and his predecessors like Marcel Mauss may provide at least an attack on this problem.

      My working hypothesis is that given the history of the Viennese numbering system, it may have stemmed from the late 1700s and this certainly wasn't an innovation by Luhmann.

      link to: https://hyp.is/hLy7NNtqEeuWQIP1UDkM6g/web.archive.org/web/20130916081433/https://christiantietze.de/posts/2013/06/zettelkasten-improves-thinking-writing/ for evidence of start of zettelkasten.de

  9. May 2022
    1. The Library Bookshelves plugin allows you to curate virtual bookshelves just like you would a shelf around a theme in your library. Bookshelves are displayed as customizable Slick carousels, using cover art from, and links to, your library catalog. The plugin creates a Bookshelves post type, shortcode, widget, and custom taxonomy.
    1. The biggest mistake—and one I’ve made myself—is linking with categories. In other words, it’s adding links like we would with tags. When we link this way we’re more focused on grouping rather than connecting. As a result, we have notes that contain many connections with little to no relevance. Additionally, we add clutter to our links which makes it difficult to find useful links when adding links. That being said, there are times when we might want to group some things. In these cases, use tags or folders.

      Most people born since the advent of the filing cabinet and the computer have spent a lifetime using a hierarchical folder-based mental model for their knowledge. For greater value and efficiency one needs to get away from this model and move toward linking individual ideas together in ways that they can more easily be re-used.

      To accomplish this many people use an index-based method that uses topical or subject headings which can be useful. However after even a few years of utilizing a generic tag (science for example) it may become overwhelmed and generally useless in a broad search. Even switching to narrower sub-headings (physics, biology, chemistry) may show the same effect. As a result one will increasingly need to spend time and effort to maintain and work at this sort of taxonomical system.

      The better option is to directly link related ideas to each other. Each atomic idea will have a much more limited set of links to other ideas which will create a much more valuable set of interlinks for later use. Limiting your links at this level will be incredibly more useful over time.

      One of the biggest benefits of the physical system used by Niklas Luhmann was that each card was required to be placed next to at least one card in a branching tree of knowledge (or a whole new branch had to be created.) Though he often noted links to other atomic ideas there was at least a minimum link of one on every idea in the system.

      For those who have difficulty deciding where to place a new idea within their system, it can certainly be helpful to add a few broad keywords of the type one might put into an index. This may help you in linking your individual ideas as you can do a search of one or more of your keywords to narrow down the existing ones within your collection. This may help you link your new idea to one or more of those already in your system. This method may be even more useful and helpful for those who are starting out and have fewer than 500-1000 notes in their system and have even less to link their new atomic ideas to.

      For those who have graphical systems, it may be helpful to look for one or two individual "tags" in a graph structure to visually see the number of first degree notes that link to them as a means of creating links between atomic ideas.

      To have a better idea of a hierarchy of value within these ideas, it may help to have some names and delineate this hierarchy of potential links. Perhaps we might borrow some well ideas from library and information science to guide us? There's a system in library science that uses a hierarchical set up using the phrases: "broader terms", "narrower terms", "related terms", and "used for" (think alias or also known as) for cataloging books and related materials.

      We might try using tags or index-like links in each of these levels to become more specific, but let's append "connected atomic ideas" to the bottom of the list.

      Here's an example:

      • broader terms (BT): [[physics]]
      • narrower terms (NT): [[mechanics]], [[dynamics]]
      • related terms (RT): [[acceleration]], [[velocity]]
      • used for (UF) or aliases:
      • connected atomic ideas: [[force = mass * acceleration]], [[$$v^2=v_0^2​+2aΔx$$]]

      Chances are that within a particular text, one's notes may connect and interrelate to each other quite easily, but it's important to also link those ideas to other ideas that are already in your pre-existing body of knowledge.


      See also: Thesaurus for Graphic Materials I: Subject Terms (TGM I) https://www.loc.gov/rr/print/tgm1/ic.html

  10. Apr 2022
    1. Since most of our feeds rely on either machine algorithms or human curation, there is very little control over what we actually want to see.

      While algorithmic feeds and "artificial intelligences" might control large swaths of what we see in our passive acquisition modes, we can and certainly should spend more of our time in active search modes which don't employ these tools or methods.

      How might we better blend our passive and active modes of search and discovery while still having and maintaining the value of serendipity in our workflows?

      Consider the loss of library stacks in our research workflows? We've lost some of the serendipity of seeing the book titles on the shelf that are adjacent to the one we're looking for. What about the books just above and below it? How do we replicate that sort of serendipity into our digital world?

      How do we help prevent the shiny object syndrome? How can stay on task rather than move onto the next pretty thing or topic presented to us by an algorithmic feed so that we can accomplish the task we set out to do? Certainly bookmarking a thing or a topic for later follow up can be useful so we don't go too far afield, but what other methods might we use? How can we optimize our random walks through life and a sea of information to tie disparate parts of everything together? Do we need to only rely on doing it as a broader species? Can smaller subgroups accomplish this if carefully planned or is exploring the problem space only possible at mass scale? And even then we may be under shooting the goal by an order of magnitude (or ten)?

    2. It is always about the new The frontpage of any content-driven media is often geared towards the latest happenings. But what if there are old gems hidden beyond? A new user wouldn’t be able to discover them.

      Older content may broadly be considered more valuable than newer content. The fact that it has been "tried and true" gives it enormously more value than newer and untested content.

      Newer content is primarily valuable solely because it is new. How much of it will live on to become old content without falling off of the long tail of the value distribution?

      Link this to the idea of imitation > innovation in Annie Murphy Paul's book The Extended Mind.

      Link this to the fact that NASA uses 30+ year old software and systems in their outer-space program because all the glitches and bugs have been found and it's far more reliable.


      Finding the older gems has generally been the sort of driving idea behind @peterhagen and his https://lindylearn.io/ site -- particularly his Hacker News tool.

  11. Mar 2022
    1. capacity building

      Built With Bits

      In 2021, our eight-week mentoring programme helped educators and teachers to achieve this by combining collaborative learning experiences and digital technologies with the values of accessibility, inclusivity and sustainability that are at the heart of the European Commission’s New European Bauhaus movement.

      The programme explored how virtual experiences can be used within education and is designed for teachers and educators working with students in secondary education in Greece, Italy, Spain and Portugal.

      Shared during Open Education Week 2022 https://oeweek.oeglobal.org/resources/2022/built-with-bits/

  12. Feb 2022
    1. 4. What follows is the compilation of the basic catalog; that is, all book titles are copied on a piece of paper (whose pagina aversa must remain blank) according to a specifi c order, so that together with the title of every book and the name of the author, the place, year, and format of the printing, the volume, and the place of the same in the library is marked.

      Benedictine abbot Franz Stephan Rautenstrauch (1734 – 1785) in creating the Catalogo Topographico for the Vienna University Library created a nine point instruction set for cataloging, describing, and ordering books which included using paper slips.


      Interesting to note that the admonishment to leave the backs of the slips (pagina aversa), in the 1780's seems to make its way into 20th century practice by Luhmann and others.

    2. Indeed, the Jose-phinian card index owes its continued use to the failure to achieve a bound

      catalog, until a successor card catalog comes along in 1848. Only the<br /> absence of a bound repertory allows the paper slip aggregate to answer all inquiries about a book ’ s whereabouts after 1781. Thus, a failed undertaking tacitly turns into a success story.

      The Josephinian card index was created, in part on the ideas of Konrad Gessner's slip method, by accumulating slips which could be rearranged and then copied down permanently. While there was the chance that the original cards could be disordered, the fact that the approximately 300,000 cards in 205 small boxes were estimated to fill 50 to 60 folio volumes with time and expense to print it dissuaded the creation of a long desired compiled book of books. These problems along with the fact that new books being added later was sure to only compound problems of having a single reference. This failure to have a bound catalog of books unwittingly resulted in the success of the index card catalog.

  13. Jan 2022
    1. The Annotations API is an extension to the Europeana REST API which allows you to create, retrieve and manage annotations on Europeana objects. Annotations are user-contributed or system-generated enhancements, additions or corrections to (or a selection of) metadata or media. We adopted the Web Annotation Data Model as a base model for the representation of annotations and as a format for exchanging annotations between client applications and the API, but also the Web Annotation Protocol as base HTTP protocol for the API.

      Example:

      {
        "@context": “http://www.w3.org/ns/anno.jsonld”
        "id": "http://data.europeana.eu/annotations/1",
        "type": "Annotation",
        "created": "2015-03-10T14:08:07Z",
        "creator": {
          "type": "Person",
          "name": "John Smith"
        },
        "generated": "2015-04-01T09:00:00Z",
        "generator": {
            "type": "Software",
            "name": "HistoryPin",
            "homepage": "https://www.historypin.org/"
        },
        "motivation": "tagging",
        "bodyValue": "MyBeautifulTag",
        "target": "http://data.europeana.eu/item/92062/BibliographicResource_1000126189360"
      }
      
    1. Sit in your local coffee shop, and your laptop can tell you a lot. If you want deeper, more local knowledge, you will have to take the narrower path that leads between the lions and up the stairs.

      Grafton cleverly brings us back to his beginning with the New York Library, whose entrance famously has a set of stairs flanked by two majestic lions.

    2. The databases include multiple copies of some titles. But they will never provide all the copies of, say, “The Wealth of Nations” and the early responses it provoked.

      The exact same could be said of the early web which hasn't been evenly archived or easily searchable, so responses to early blog articles may not be easily found amidst a mountain of noise.

  14. Dec 2021
    1. how to create, access, make available, re-use, adapt, and redistribute OER

      As presented at OERcamp 2021:

      The three-year IMLS Grant, Reaching Out: Meeting the Needs of Rural School Librarians, focused on building capacity of stakeholders to create, access, use, adapt and redistribute OER. Grant participants learned the skills needed to utilize Open Educational Resources (OER), to integrate digital applications into professional practices, and to serve as instructional leaders in their schools.

      See presentation resources https://tie.link/oercamp

    2. libraries

      The Open Education in European Libraries of Higher Education (2021) provides a comprehensive summary of how European libraries are implementing the UNESCO Recommendation of OER. "The research analysed responses from 233 libraries from 28 European countries. Respondents primarily came from universities, followed by technical colleges, specialised institutions, universities of applied sciences, teaching colleges, distance education institutions and other service centres."

      The SPARC Europe survey shows familiarity with the UNESCO OER Recommendation amongst many academic libraries, with about one-third of respondents taking concerted action. Therefore, whilst some concretely address the UNESCO OER Recommendation, further awareness-raising and support in academic libraries and their institutions is required to help implement it.

      Of all of the five actions of the UNESCO Recommendation on OER, building the capacity of stakeholders to create, access, re-use, adapt and redistribute OER, developing supportive policy for OER, encouraging inclusive and equitable quality OER, nurturing the creation of sustainability models for OER, and promoting and reinforcing international cooperation in OER, libraries are carrying out capacity-building activities the most. Libraries continue to lead or support OE in equal measure and lead in areas close to their core work. They do this mainly through their teaching and learning and research support departments. In addition, they work in conjunction with Open Access and Open Science areas when advocating for open.

    1. Deeply importing Svelte components is not supported. Either import all components from one entrypoint, or always stick to deep imports, otherwise it could cause multiple instance of the Svelte library running.
    1. A good library is filled with mostly unread books. That’s the point. Our relationship with the unknown causes the very problem Taleb is famous for contextualizing: the black swan. Because we underestimate the value of what we don’t know and overvalue what we do know, we fundamentally misunderstand the likelihood of surprises. The antidote to this overconfidence boils down to our relationship with knowledge. The anti-scholar, as Taleb refers to it, is “someone who focuses on the unread books, and makes an attempt not to treat his knowledge as a treasure, or even a possession, or even a self-esteem enhancement device — a skeptical empiricist.” My library serves as a visual reminder of what I don’t know.

      I prefer the positive interpretation, of how much more there is to know. Quantifying anything in terms of how much we do not have is limited because we have finite knowledge out of an infinite set.

      Each book instead of referencing something we do not know is a portal into things we have yet to know.

      I think Nassim Taleb also mentioned elsewhere that having a lot of books you haven't read shows interest in a topic.

  15. Nov 2021
    1. copyright and open licensing of educational material

      A very excellent example of this in action is the Copyright First Responders Pacific Northwest that creates a network and directory of librarians who "have received training and, crucially, support one another in providing basic front-line triage for copyright questions in their home libraries and, in many cases, beyond." Sort of like 911 for copyright?

      The program is modeled after the program created at Harvard... one can wonder what if this was scaled or spread more widely?

    1. The usual targets of The Publishers Association include domains that facilitate access to the popular Libgen library and eBook portals eBookee and FreeBookSpot. The trend was maintained this week when ISP TalkTalk revealed that more domains had been blocked in the UK. The new additions are as follows: ebookee.unblockit.kim, ebookee.123unblock.world, ebookee.mrunblock.bar, ebookee.nocensor.biz, ebookee.unbl4you.cyou, ebookee.unbl0ck.icu, ebookee.unblockproject.top, ebookee.proxybit.sbs, freebookspot.unblockit.kim, libgen.unblockit.kim, libgen.123unblock.world, libgen.mrunblock.bar, libgen.nocensor.biz, libgen.unbl4you.cyou,, libgen.unbl0ck.icu, libgen.unblockproject.top, libgen.proxybit.sbs
    1. you can define locally parse and it should take precedence over the one in the library: interface JSON { parse(text: string, reviver?: (key: any, value: any) => any): unknown; }
  16. Oct 2021
    1. we establish Saturated Programmable Insertion Engineering (SPINE), an unbiased, comprehensive, and targeted domain insertion library generation technique using oligo library synthesis and multi-step Golden Gate cloning
    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Peter Hagen</span> in Peter Hagen (@peterhagen_) / Twitter (<time class='dt-published'>10/25/2021 09:47:19</time>)</cite></small>

  17. Sep 2021
  18. Aug 2021
    1. In the vast majority of cases when I'm using prettier-ignore I'm only really looking to prevent it from breaking my code into new lines, whilst keeping its other transformations such as switching quotes and adding space between brackets. When ignoring single lines, fixing these formatting problems by hand is very manageable. With the ability to have Prettier ignore entire blocks of code I think the ability to specify what you want it to ignore is essential.
    2. This should be basic functionality.
  19. Jul 2021
    1. Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716), der nicht nur angesehener Mathematiker und Philosoph war, sondern auch Bibliothekar der Herzog August Bibliothek in Wolfenbüttel, soll sich eigens einen Karteischrank als Büchermöbel nach eigenen Vorstellungen haben bauen lassen.

      Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz (1646-1716), who was not only a respected mathematician and philosopher, but also librarian at the Herzog August Library in Wolfenbüttel, is said to have had a filing cabinet built for him as book furniture according to his own ideas.

      I'm curious to hear more about what this custom library furniture looked like? Could it have been the precursor to the modern-day filing cabinet?

      I can picture something like the recent photo I saw of Bob Hope amidst his commonplace book.

    1. The Joke File has been scanned into an internal database that is accessible on-site in both the Recorded Sound and Moving Image Research Centers.

      Bob Hope's commonplace book of jokes has been scanned digitally and available at the United States Library of Congress.

  20. Jun 2021
    1. AnyCable uses the same protocol as ActionCable, so you can use its JavaScript client without any monkey-patching.