162 Matching Annotations
  1. Dec 2019
    1. If you are using a JavaScript library, chances are it comes with a client HTTP API. jQuery’s $.ajax() function, for example, has been particularly popular with frontend developers. But as developers move away from such libraries in favor of native APIs, dedicated HTTP clients have emerged to fill the gap.
  2. Nov 2019
    1. Component Registration components A map of component names to plain JavaScript components. frameworkComponents A map of component names to framework (React, Angular etc) components.
    1. When the grid is initialised, it will fire the gridReady event. If you want to use the API of the grid, you should put an onGridReady(params) callback onto the grid and grab the api from the params. You can then call this api at a later stage to interact with the grid (on top of the interaction that can be done by setting and changing the props).
    1. President Trump distanced himself from Gordon D. Sondland after the ambassador said multiple top officials, including Mike Pompeo, Mike Pence and Mick Mulvaney, knew about the campaign to pressure Ukraine to announce investigations of Democrats. Mr. Sondland confirmed there was a “clear quid pro quo” for a White House meeting between Mr. Trump and Ukraine’s president.

      Very damaging testimony for Trump

    1. Since the checkbox is rendering an input I would work with it rather than focusing on the image. You could do something like this: const checkbox = getByTestId('checkbox-1234').querySelector('input[type="checkbox"]') expect(checkbox).toHaveProperty('checked', true)
    2. the way Material UI works is it renders a different SVG when the checkbox is clicked, and not changing the attributes or anything on the actual input element. So how do I actually test that the element is checked in line with the react-testing-library philosophy?

      These tags belong to entire page. This quote is just supporting evidence for the tags.

    1. We are beginning a renovation of our main library at Northeastern University, Snell Library, and have been talking with architects (some of them very well-known), and I’ve found the discussions utterly invigorating. I would like to find some way to blog or newsletter about the process we will go through over the next few years, and to think aloud about the (re)design and (future) function of the library. I’m not sure if that should occur in this space or elsewhere, although the thought of launching another outlet fills me with dread. Let me know if this topic would interest you, and if I should include it here.

      Definitely interesting. Please include it here or on your main site!!!

  3. Oct 2019
    1. If you're given a set of factories (say, from a gem developer) but want to change them to fit into your application better, you can modify that factory instead of creating a child factory and adding attributes there.
    1. Currently, untenured librarians get 30 days ( 6 weeks) of research leave in an academic year for five years. Can someone explain how this will change in the new contract. I am so sorry to ask this question. It is very confusing to me. Thank you.

    1. access to required and recommended course materials

      Although buying every required textbook would probably break the bank at most libraries, I wonder whether faculty could help by requiring the publisher to provide a desk copy and then donating it to the library?

    Tags

    Annotators

  4. Sep 2019
  5. Aug 2019
  6. Jul 2019
  7. americanlibrariesmagazine.org americanlibrariesmagazine.org
    1. Toronto Public Library’s Tor Browser

      Tor como navegador en la Biblioteca Pública de Toronto. ¡Súper!

    2. ALA expressed concern about changes announced on June 17 by Hachette Book Group (HBG) and on July 2 by Simon & Schuster (S&S) to their ebook and digital audiobook lending models for libraries

      Están preocupados por las propuestas de préstamo de libro digital.

    3. The American Library Association (ALA), along with seven other professional organizations, released a joint statement on June 17 promising to uphold the standards of equity, diversity, and inclusion (EDI).

      Bibliotecas y diversidad

    4. NEWSMAKERGeorge Takei p. 10International Innovatorsp. 28PLUS:Exhibit Hall Highlights and Battling MisinformationAnnualConferencewrap-up2 019p. 12July/August 2019

      Revista de ALA, Junio / Julio 2019

    1. Apply for a new U.S. passport at the Info Desk on the Main Level.

      Another test

  8. Jun 2019
  9. May 2019
  10. americanlibrariesmagazine.org americanlibrariesmagazine.org
    1. Digital BadgesHow schools and libraries use them today

      Interesante idea sobre educación

    2. Rather than simply posting event information on social media, give your followers a task within the post

      Interesante idea. ¿Cómo podría funcionar en la práctica?

    3. NETHERLANDS

      Bibliotecas en Países Bajos

    4. Wi-Fi in the “White Space”Unused TV spectrum offers libraries potential for rural broadband

      Este debate no se ha dado en bibliotecas y resulta muy interesante. Sigue la línea del Foro de Gobernanza de Internet

    5. 80%Percentage of 2014–2015 MLIS graduates who were women.

      Hay mayoría de mujeres en esta estadística.

    6. A Resolution in Support of Civil Rights Protections for People of Diverse Gender Identities

      Diversidad de género y bibliotecas

    7. 2019 Virtual Membership Meeting

      Hacen reuniones virtuales de los socios. Bien pensado.

    8. All people, regardless of origin, age, back-ground, or views, possess a right to privacy and confidentiality in their library use. Libraries should advocate for, educate about, and protect people’s privacy, safeguarding all library use data, including personally identifiable information.

      Aquí el artículo.

    9. Privacy Article Added to Library Bill of Rights

      Sobre privacidad.

    10. Funding cuts may have forced libraries to limit hours and curtail services, but the need for children’s literacy programming hasn’t disappeared.

      Muy cierto.

    11. May 2019

      ALA Magazine

  11. Apr 2019
    1. Library users’ privacy rights are another urgent issue.

      El otro tema es la privacidad de los usuarios.

    2. As a result, most challenges to library resources in 2018 focused on materials and programs addressing issues of concern to those in the lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgen-der, queer, intersex, asexual, and related (LGBTQIA+) communities, most notably drag queen story hours and books affirming transgender youth, like Alex Gino’s George.

      Uno de los retos para las bibliotecas en Estados Unidos es la tolerancia en asuntos relacionados con comunidades LGBTQIA+

    3. 9Public Libraries12Academic Libraries14School Libraries

      Este número especial analiza el estado de las bibliotecas públicas, académicas y escolares. Nunca había visto este formato y me gusta bastante.

    4. Libraries and the law

      Políticas públicas y bibliotecas

    5. a collaborationof ALA with Grow with Google

      Coperación entre ALA y Google, para la semana del código. ¡Tremendo!

    6. Libraries Ready to Code

      Sobre programación y desarrollo de software en bibliotecas

    7. Here are the “Top 11 Most Challenged Books in 2018”:

      Top 11 de los libros que más retos implicaron en 2018

    8. 200+Books donated to Orange City (Iowa) Public Library after four LGBTQIA+ library books were burned by a religious activist

      Libros quemados en 2019. Literalmente destruidos :S

    9. CENSORSHIP

      Sobre censura en 2019

    10. THE STATE OFAMERICA’STHE MAGAZINE OF THE AMERICAN LIBRARY ASSOCIATIONSPECIAL REPORT | APRIL 2019LIBRARIES

      Número especial

  12. Mar 2019
    1. 1Engaging Adults Learners with TechnologyThrough hands-on experience and reviewing the literature, two instruction librarians explore and model best practice

      This article comes from the Twin Cities Campus Library and discusses how to engage adult learners with technology. First, it looks at Kolb's learning model of instructional design which includes that adults must have applying, awakening, practicing and observing. It is also imperative to have hands on learning when it comes to technology. Rating 7/10

    1. New Media Consortium Horizon Report This page provides a link to the annual Horizon Report. The report becomes available late in the year. The report identifies emerging technologies that are likely to be influential and describes the timeline and prospective impact for each. Unlike the link to top learning tools that anyone can use, the technologies listed here may be beyond the ability of the average trainer to implement. While it is informative and perhaps a good idea to stay abreast of these listings, it is not necessarily something that the average instructional designer can apply. Rating: 3/5

  13. Dec 2018
    1. Minneapolis Central Library is hosting a Hullaballoo for History Day participants, Saturday, Dec. 1, 11 a.m. - 3 p.m.

      For all the people who love history day

  14. Oct 2018
  15. Sep 2018
    1. Annotation tools provide an alternative to the image of the solitary student sitting in the library reading a text.

      Not sure it needs to be alternative. The library itself if of course a deeply networked space--not only because of the databases available, but because of the abundance of interconnected paper texts.

  16. Jul 2018
  17. Jun 2018
  18. May 2018
    1. more design-driven.

      As someone who loves design (especially to do with books and texts (e.g. Coralie Bickford-Smith's work with Penguin Publishing)), this is very interesting to me. This may not have to do with digital humanities per say, but the interplay of physical books (especially publishing companies and their need to $compete$ with digital texts) with digital modes of communication has led to the design of more aesthetically pleasing book designs. This idea makes me think that maybe books are viewed as elitist forms, and digital texts are viewed as 'lower' forms.

  19. Apr 2018
  20. Jan 2018
  21. Oct 2017
    1. How library collections budgets work By Library Loon 27 October 2017 Library as organization, Scholarly communication 3 Comments “Why can’t open-access initiatives get some of that sweet, sweet library budget money?” the Loon was asked (well, entitledly whinged at, but it comes to much the same thing). Short answer: The librarians in charge of allocating collections money have no incentive to support open access, and the librarians (supposedly) in charge of changing scholarly communication have either zero budget or strictly-earmarked budgets that do not permit this use. QED.

      This is a great article on the structure of library budgets. I think one of the most interesting reflections is that the creation of buying consortia is a response to the structure of scholarly publishing, so the two kind of fit hand in glove. Moving away from that structure is going to be very challenging.

  22. Sep 2017
    1. Badging may be seen as an alternative to traditional forms of educational assessment and recognition. Traditional systems for recognizing learning – letter grades, transcripts, or even diplomas– may not be able to fully demonstrate students’ actual learning or achievements. Digital badging would allow metadata to be attached to each badge, bringing together valuable information about the criteria for earning the badge, the institution or instructor behind the badge, the date the badge was earned, descriptions or copies of assessment tools, or even examples of actual work submitted to receive the badge. [4] Additionally, as a form of micro-credentialing, badging would help document specific learning achievement along a larger path towards general achievement.

      This is a good idea for large, multi-site libraries. Staff have trouble leaving the branch for training, and have no incentive to increase their skills. Badges would be a tangible result, which (ideally) would accrue over time to illustrate an upward trend in skill development. An extrinsic motivator, true, but also a record of effort and time expended.

    1. Spectral Python (SPy) is a pure Python module for processing hyperspectral image data. It has functions for reading, displaying, manipulating, and classifying hyperspectral imagery. It can be used interactively from the Python command prompt or via Python scripts
  23. Feb 2017
    1. Through the Wikipedia Library program, the encyclopedia’s editors have free access to a collection of over 80,000 unique periodicals, like journals, magazines, newspapers, newsletters, pamphlets, and series, in addition to an untallyable number of books.

      What a resource!

    1. It’s about whether we’re abiding by the principles we claim as being core to our profession—in particular, those principles related to intellectual freedom, the public good, and service.

      The mission of the library.

    1. Trinity College, Dublin.

      The famous Trinity College library is the permanent home of the Book of Kells, It's also where Jack Gleason attended university after finishing his run on Game of Thrones.

  24. Nov 2016
    1. These members are engaged because their relationship with the association enables them to do something they want to do in the first place, better than they would be able to do on their own.

      Required for building engagement amongst a group of volunteers, too, no doubt.

  25. Oct 2016
    1. The resource-based economy goes like this: In the future robots will do all the jobs (including creating new robots and fixing broken one). Now, imagine the world is like a public library, where you can borrow any book you want but never own it. Fresco wants all enterprise like this, whether it’s groceries, new tech, gasoline, or alcohol. He wants everything free and eventually provided to us by robots, software, and automation.

      I think this is achievable, if we emphasize specialized libraries and cooperative models around resources (i.e. tool/tech libraries, food banks/co-ops)

  26. Jul 2016
    1. Page 17

      Borgman argues that the term Digital Library causes trouble because it quote obscures the complex relationship between electronic information Collections and libraries as institutions.

  27. Jun 2016
    1. If the RRID is well-formed, and if the lookup found the right record, a human validator tags it a valid RRID — one that can now be associated mechanically with occurrences of the same resource in other contexts. If the RRID is not well-formed, or if the lookup fails to find the right record, a human validator tags the annotation as an exception and can discuss with others how to handle it. If an RRID is just missing, the validator notes that with another kind of exception tag.

      Sounds a lot like the way reference managers work. In many cases, people keep the invalid or badly-formed results.

  28. May 2016
    1. "Historic trove of documents discovered in city attic," Herald.ie (2016-05-16) http://www.herald.ie/news/historic-trove-of-documents-discovered-in-city-attic-34707155.html

      The four missing volumes of Prisoner Books listing the arrests of more than 30,000 people between 1905 and 1918 include the "crimes" of labour leaders Jim Larkin (seditious conspiracy), James Connolly (incitement to crime), revolutionary Maud Gonne MacBride (defence of the realm), and suffragette Hanna Sheehy-Skeffington (glass-breaking with other suffragettes).

    2. "Poverty, manslaughter and stealing apples: police records shed light on Dublin 100 years ago," journal.ie (2015-05-14) http://www.thejournal.ie/police-records-arrests-100-years-ago-dublin-2765946-May2016/

      LIFE IN DUBLIN in the early 20th century was tough, especially given the huge class divide. However, it was also a time of remarkable change. Newly-released digitised Dublin Metropolitan Police records show us what life was like from 1905 to 1918. The records cover some of Dublin’s major historical events, including the 1913 Lockout, the 1916 Rising and its aftermath. Over 30,000 people were arrested during this period and these details are all contained in the records.

      Sean Lemass' arrest (down as John Lemass) fifth row from the bottom.

    3. "Thousands of files containing details of prisoners arrested during 1913 Lockout, Easter Rising published online," RTÉ Six-One News (2016-05-11) [flash video]

      http://www.rte.ie/news/player/2016/0511/20986024-thousands-of-files-containing-details-of-prisoners-arrested-during-1913-lockout-easter-rising-published-online/

      RTÉ Six-One News report on the restoration of DMP Prisoners Books to the Garda Museum and Archives, and launch of the four digitised volumes of Dublin Metropolitan Police prisoner books from the Irish revolutionary period.

    4. "UCD Library Cultural Heritage: Launch of the Dublin Metropolitan Police Prisoners Books." Flickr (2015-05-11)

      Flickr album of photographs from the SPITU-sponsored launch of the digital DMP Prisoners Books at Liberty Hall, Dublin.

    5. "SIPTU presents historic DMP files to Garda and to UCD online library" (2016-05-11) http://www.siptu.ie/media/pressreleases2016/featurednews/fullstory_19808_en.html

      SIPTU presented ‘Prisoners Books’ concerning over 30,000 people arrested by the Dublin Metropolitan Police (DMP) between 1905 and 1918 to the Garda Síochána at a ceremony in Liberty Hall, Dublin, this morning (11th May).

    6. PULSE, 1916. http://www.broadsheet.ie/2016/05/11/fingers-on-the-pulse-of-1916/

      The Dublin Metropolitan Police (DMP) Prisoners Books for 1905-1908 and 1911-1918 are amongst the most valuable new documents to come to light on the revolutionary decade.

      They include important information on social and political life in the capital during the last years of the Union, from the period of widespread anticipation of Home Rule, to the advent of the 1913 Lockout, the outbreak of the First World War in 1914, the Easter Rising and its aftermath in 1916, and including the conscription crisis of 1918.

      They will also be invaluable to those interested in criminology, genealogy, and family history.

      The collection comprises of four large leather bound, double ledger volumes containing hand written entries that record the details of daily charge sheets issued by DMP members to offenders or alleged offenders.

      Each volume contains the name, age, address, occupation, alleged offence and, in most cases, outcome of cases involving over 30,000 people arrested by the DMP.

      Each volume also contains an index of prisoners with references to the pages containing details of the charge. The information in these volumes serves, therefore, to provide new perspectives on life in Dublin during a time of war and revolution.

    7. "Discovery of police files opens new chapter on Rising era," Irish Times (2016-05-11) http://www.irishtimes.com/culture/heritage/discovery-of-police-files-opens-new-chapter-on-rising-era-1.2644187

      Records found in Clontarf attic detail arrests of Larkin and Connolly during Dublin lockout

    8. Dublin Metropolitan Police's Prisoners Books released," Irish Geneology News (2016-05-12) http://www.irishgenealogynews.com/2016/05/dublin-metropolitan-polices-prisoners.html

      Launched yesterday at Liberty Hall, these records date from Ireland's revolutionary era and include all manner of crimes listed in register pages headed 'Prisoners charged with offences involving dishonesty'. ...

    9. "Dublin Metropolitan Police Prisoner Books 1905-1918," The British GENES blog (2016-05-12) http://britishgenes.blogspot.ie/2016/05/dublin-metropolitan-police-prisoner.html

      University College Dublin's Digital Library (http://digital.ucd.ie) has just uploaded digitised editions of four Dublin Metropolitan Police prisoners books from 1905-1908, and 1911-1918, at http://digital.ucd.ie/view/ucdlib:43945.

    10. "Historic police records showing Connolly and Larkin arrests found in skip," Irish Independent (2016-05-11) http://www.independent.ie/irish-news/historic-police-records-showing-connolly-and-larkin-arrests-found-in-skip-34707471.html

      The four missing volumes of 'Prisoner Books' listing the arrests of more than 30,000 people between 1905 and 1918 include the "crimes" of labour leaders Jim Larkin (seditious conspiracy), James Connolly (incitement to crime), revolutionary Maud Gonne MacBride (defence of the realm) and suffragette Hanna Sheehy Skeffington, (glass-breaking with other suffragettes).

    11. "Records of 1916 Rising arrests published online," Irish Examiner (2016-05-12)

      Reports containing details of 30,000 arrests by the Dublin Metropolitan Police more than 100 years ago have been published online, writes Dan Buckley.

      They contain details of prisoners during the Lockout of 1913, the outbreak of the First World War and the 1916 Easter Rising.

    12. "Dublin Metropolitan prisoner books available online," Irish Times (2016-05-11) http://www.rte.ie/news/2016/0511/787671-dublin-metropolitan-prisoners-books/

      Dublin Metropolitan Prisoners Books from over 100 years ago containing reports of over 30,000 arrests have been published online.

  29. Apr 2016
    1. Ebenso wie ich für human centered urban spaces plädiere, plädiere ich auch für human centered libraries, deren itterative Planungs- und Umsetzungsverfahren möglichst viele stakeholder einbeziehen.

      Interesting thought: human-centered libraries

    1. Scholarly communication is the system through which research and other scholarly writings are created, evaluated for quality, disseminated to the scholarly community, and preserved for future use.” –Association of College and Research Libraries
  30. Mar 2016
    1. But I see some promising changes that align with the emphasis in the Framework on creating rather than consuming, on understanding systems of information rather than how to find stuff, on context and making critical judgments that go beyond making convenient consumer choices. If we think about information as something communities create in conversation within a social and economic context rather than as a consumer good, we may put less emphasis on being local franchises for big information conglomerates and put more time, resources, and creativity into supporting local creativity and discovery. We may begin to do better at working across boundaries to support and fund open access to research rather than focusing most of our efforts on paying the rent and maintaining the security of our walled gardens. And as we make this shift, we may be able to stop teaching students how to shop efficiently for information that won’t be available once they graduate. We may help them think more critically about where knowledge comes from and how they can participate in making sense of things.

      Nice!!!

    1. In the MIT Libraries we’ve just launched a new and innovative approach for our scholarly communications program — and for our collections budget: the collections budget is now part of the scholarly communications program.

      Super rad!

  31. Feb 2016
    1. Zoomerang

      zoomerang survey software option

    2. While the display is appealing and easy to read, it is not customizable

      Polldaddy: survey software selection. List of cons.

    3. Polldaddy for iOS was a great option for this type of assessment. The layout and design are optimized for the iPad’s screen, and survey results are loaded offline. Be-cause an Internet connection is not required to administer a survey, the researcher has more flexibility in location of survey administration.

      Polldaddy did not require wireless internet access, making it a more flexible survey-software option

    4. Google Forms

      Chosen survey-taking software for iPad surveys given to users at GSU.

    5. A two-question survey was designed to pilot the iPadas a survey delivery device in GSU Library. The first survey question was ―Why did you come to the library today? Please choose the primary reason.‖ Ten response options were listed in alphabetical order, and survey takers were allowed to select one option. The tenth response option was ―other,‖ with a text field in which survey takers could enter their own explanations. This question was included because the library is extremely busy, with an average daily door count of 10,000 during a typical semester. The door count data show heavy use of the building, but the library has little means of finding out what visitors do while they are in the buildings. The second survey question was ―What is your major?,‖ which was an open-text field.

      Georgia State Library test-survey (two questions).

    6. Bhaskaran (2010) recently weighed in on the benefits of using iPads for survey re-search, but little has been written about the use of tablet computers as mobile assess-ment devices. What literature does exist primarily relates to the healthcare professions.
    7. Over the past few years, the market research literature has reflected a concern about the quality of face-to-face market research as compared to online surveys and polls. Manfreda, Bosnjak, Berzelak, Haas, and Vehovar (2008) analyzed other studies that compared response rates from Web-based surveys to response rates of at least one other survey delivery method. Web survey responses were, on average, eleven percent lower than the other methods investigated. In their study of face-to-face survey responses as compared to online survey responses, Heerwegh and Looseveldt (2008) concluded that responses to Web surveys were of poorer quality and, overall, less suffi-cient than responses to surveys conducted face-to-face.

      face-to-face surveying produces greater results than web-based surveys.

  32. Jan 2016
    1. albums produced between 1908 and 1913 by developers and the real estate industry to entice potential middle and upper class tenants to New York City’s “principal high class apartment houses,” declares one volume’s subtitle. Each featured apartment house is briefly described, and illustrated with an exterior photograph and one or more floor plans.

      Mauricio Geraldo made a game out of the floor plans.<br> http://publicdomain.nypl.org/mansion-maniac/<br> http://github.com/nypl-publicdomain/mansion-maniac

  33. Dec 2015
  34. Nov 2015
    1. Les représentants de la Bibliothèque nationale de France (BnF) annoncèrent leur objectif de ramener le délai de traitement des documents à six semaines en moyenne

      C’était long, en 2002! Où en est la BnF, aujourd’hui? D’une certaine façon, ce résumé semble prédire la venue des données, la fédération des catalogues, etc. Pourtant, il semble demeurer de nombreux obstacles, malgré tout ce temps. Et si on pouvait annoter le Web directement?

  35. Sep 2015
    1. ibrary to easily add annotation functionality to any webpage. Annotations can

      This is a test. Library