90 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2021
    1. Anne: So a couple of things to reflect on. When we talked to young men similar to you who went as children and parents were working in the US while they're growing up, a lot of them turned to gangs and criminal behavior. You did not.Juan: No.Anne: What do you think the difference was?Juan: I don't know. I guess some people… I would say my dad, he provided me with the role model. Because I told you, my dad is a hardworking man. Since we were little, we were nine or ten, he would make us go to work with him, even on the weekends, even if we would just go and pick up trash or even just to be there, he would make us go. In the way he taught us, that if you want something you have to go out and do it. No one is going to get it for you.Juan: In my situation, my dad was a role model and he made it so gang affiliation or violence never came to my head. I had cousins. One of my cousins was gang affiliated and he is older than me for two years or three years, so I saw that he was in a gang and he had a lot of friends and, in a way, it did push me to want to be like him because I saw him, he had power, but I always knew that gang affiliation wasn't my thing.Juan: Because, again, through sports, school, my dad, going to work, that helped me not get into that. I guess people who do get in gangs, I don't know if they feel alone or they feel by being in a gang you have a new family who has your back. That could also have them go towards a gang affiliation. You don't know their background as a house, if their parents are not well, or if they had a dad who was abusive or a mom who was abusive.Juan: A lot of things come from home when it comes to gang affiliation, or the people that you hang out with, the people that you surround yourself with. Fortunately, I was surrounding myself with good people who came from good families and showed me different things in life that didn't have to do with gang affiliation. When I was in high school, there was a lot of people who were in gangs. I was friends with them, but to the point where I wanted to be in their gang or affiliated with them that just didn't come to my mind.

      Time in the US, Gangs, Resisting affiliation

    1. Claudia: My first question for you is why did you or your family decide to leave Mexico, and how did you cross the border?Yosell: Let’s see. I think I was about three or four months old when I crossed the border the first time. It was just, you're going to cross the border, and so I crossed the border through, it was TJ [Tijuana] at the time. And I was living in San Francisco for maybe like two years. After that, from what my dad tells me, and to what I remember, we were just moving around the U.S., and quite a couple of places.Yosell: From what I do remember, I used to live in Vegas with an aunt there. I was doing my elementary school and then after that I moved out to Utah and started doing a little bit of my middle school and after that I was kind of moving around a lot of places, I guess just working—my dad got me a job working for construction. And I was doing my high school online, a kind of homeschool thing. That was pretty interesting. I would come back to Mexico quite often. I would kind of just jump the border and come see my mom, and then I jumped it again.Claudia: And you would go back?Yosell: Yeah.Claudia: How many times did you say that you did that?Yosell: Six or eight times just jumping it.Claudia: You were over there without your parents or anybody?Yosell: With my dad. I was already with my dad.Claudia: How did it feel to be separated from your mom?Yosell: I don't know if it would be a big thing since I was always kind of with my dad, and I would see my mom almost every... I would come back every Mother's Day or Christmas kind of thing. Come back to see her, and then I would just basically just jump it again. Since dad knew people that would cross the border quite often, that's where they would do it.

      Mexico before the US, Migration from Mexico, Reasons, Economic, Family Relationships, Those who stayed in Mexico, Those who were in the US

  2. Jun 2021
    1. Isabel: And you said you became a chef—you started at Applebee's—can you tell me what the restaurant experience was like becoming a chef and moving around from there?Angelo: Well, when we first got to the U.S , my dad got into construction and so after a few years he got tired of that physically—it was very physically demanding—so he got into the restaurant. By the time I was 16, he had already had his status. He was a very good cook, so he brought me along. I was under his training from then on. I got that spark again, to want to do something, because I saw everybody, how they treated my dad, and literally just because I had his last name, it was, "Okay, you got the job." And my dad was at a very prestigious level to where many people would call him offering jobs or—Isabel: Your dad was undocumented as well?Angelo: Yes. When I saw that, I was like, "Okay, I might not be able to go to college, but maybe I could become a manager, maybe I could have my own kitchen, maybe I could have my own store, my own restaurant." And so being under my dad's training gave me that spark. I overpassed my dad, there were points after three years in a restaurant where I wasn't my dad's son anymore, I was my own person. I could go up to people and they would be like, "Yeah, I know who you are." At first it was all like, "Okay, who are you?" “Well, I'm ____ son.” “Oh wow. Okay, well here you go.” But then after a while it was, "Okay, well we need you because we've heard of you and we need you to pick our store back up." And so after that, that was my goal to have a restaurant, my own restaurant.Isabel: What was your favorite restaurant to work at?Angelo: That's very difficult, but I would probably say Applebee's just because that's where I started, and it just brings so much memories of me learning, me getting that experience, me burning myself a lot. And so yeah, that was probably the best time of my life, working at Applebee's.Isabel: Even though you went on to surpass your father?Angelo: [Affirmative noise].Isabel: It's really cool. So, you have kind of like this going…Start pursuing cooking and kind of earning that prestige or going after your father. But then you also mentioned that you're doing this because you had to support a family. Were you living with your baby's mother at the time? Were you together?Angelo: Well it was very difficult because at the age of 16, my father had legal problems. He ended up going away for, I would say, half a year-a little bit more than half a year. Throughout that time, there was a point where I had to basically become the man of the house. My mom doesn't drive, so I would take her to her job and I would bring her back. There was many times where I had to drive at three or four in the morning. So at the age of 16, I wanted to become that. I wanted to become that man of the house. And really that's the main reason why I had my baby, because I said, “I could do this, I want this, I want to be a father, and I'm going to be a father.”Angelo: And so, at the age of the age of 16, I moved out of my parents' house. After three months of working, I moved out of my parents' house, got my own apartment. And I ended up working two jobs at a time to be able to support my family and be on my own. After a while it was very difficult. So, there were plenty of times where we'd be on our own, and then something bad would happen financially, and so we'd go back to our parents' house. It was just basically on and off being on our own and not being able to make it.Isabel: So you said you were 16, so did you say you were older when you were renting a house or an apartment or anything that you'd pretend?Angelo: Yes, when I was 16, I had to get fake IDs, fake social security cards, and so that's how I got my apartment. Even 16, I looked older than what I was, so it was really no problem for me to apply for an apartment, or anything like that.Isabel: Did the restaurants that you would work with or the people there know that you were undocumented or that are younger?Angelo: No.Isabel: How old were you when you were becoming the chef?Angelo: 16.Isabel: That's incredible. I'm learning how to like... the other day I Googled how to cook chicken [Both laugh].Angelo: It was very difficult, but I wanted to do that. I saw my father, and I wanted to be him. I wanted to be him.Isabel: So, I'm just still trying to wrap my head around this. So, I know you started at Applebee's, but when you started at the last restaurant you work for, it was this like English, British kind of style. It's more on the other ends of the Applebee's spectrum?Angelo: Oh very.Isabel: Very much like more high end?Angelo: [Affirmative noise].Isabel: How old were you when you were a chef for that restaurant?Angelo: I was 20, 21 years old.Isabel: So that's kind of like where your career span…still so incredibly young. So how old did they think you were when you were working for them?Angelo: Then I could say I was 21.Isabel: Okay, so then that's fine.Angelo: Yeah.Isabel: That's enough credit.Angelo: Yeah, by then they knew who I was. There was points where I would get called in from other stores and they would tell me, “Leave where you're at and we'll give you $3 more.” Literally, I've never made minimum wage. And so that's basically how about how I got to $15.50 at the end. The reason I went to the British restaurant was because I was at Applebee's, and me and my dad would bump heads. He was the top chef, and I would also be considered the top chef. So whenever we would work shifts, it was all like, "Okay, so who's in charge?"Isabel: Literally too many cooks in the kitchen.Angelo: So that's when I said, "Okay, well I got to be on my own. I got to do my own thing.: And thank God I was able to do it. I put my mind to it and I got my name out there.

      Time in the US, Jobs/employment/work, occupations, chef, feelings, pride, dreams, excitement, hope

  3. Apr 2021
  4. Mar 2021
    1. Fibar bi jàngal na taawan bu góor ni ñuy dagge reeni aloom.

      Le guérisseur a appris à son fils aîné comment on coupe les racines du Diospyros.

      fibar -- (fibar bi? the healer? as in feebar / fièvre / fever? -- used as a general term for sickness).

      bi -- the (indicates nearness).

      jàngal v. -- to teach (something to someone), to learn (something from someone) -- compare with jàng (as in janga wolof) and jàngale.

      na -- pr. circ. way, defined, distant. How? 'Or' What. function indicator. As.

      taaw+an (taaw) bi -- first child, eldest. (taawan -- his eldest).

      bu -- the (indicates relativeness).

      góor gi -- man; male.

      ni -- pr. circ. way, defined, distant. How? 'Or' What. function indicator. As.

      ñuy -- they (?).

      dagg+e (dagg) v. -- cut; to cut.

      reen+i (reen) bi -- root, taproot, support.

      aloom gi -- Diospyros mespiliformis, EBENACEA (tree).

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BryN2nVE3jY

    2. Sëriñ boobu aj na daaw, doomam a ko wuutu léegi.

      Ce marabout est décédé l'an dernier, c'est son fils qui le remplace maintenant.

      sëriñ bi -- marabout.

      boobu -- this.

      aj (Arabic: Hajj) v. -- make the pilgrimage to Mecca. 🕋; deceased ☠️ (for a religious personality).

      na -- he (?).

      daaw n. -- last year. 🗓

      doom+am (doom) ji -- child by descent 👶🏽; doll🪆; to have a child.

  5. Dec 2020
    1. Did you know: The Stogie was invented in Wheeling, Virginia, West Virginia. In 1819, Joseph Kirk of Wheeling began manufacturing cigars and in 1825, he was listed as a Cigar and “Stogie” manufacturer. Mifflin Marsh in relating the history of the Stogie tells us, “Some inventive genius here in Wheeling, (Kirk maybe) conceived the idea of making a cheap smoke for the (Conestoga) driver.”
    1. It was the Marsh Wheeling Stogie. Founded in 1840 by Mifflin Marsh, Marsh Wheeling (from Wheeling, Virginia at the time it didn’t become West Virginia until the Civil War) initially made cigars that were affordable for the average person. Marsh made cigars that sold for less than a penny a piece. Marsh also was the first marketer in the cigar business, handing out free samples to Conestoga wagon drivers on the National Road—which ran from Baltimore to Wheeling connecting the east coast with the Ohio River – and to Captains of the river boats that dotted the Ohio River and he then sold the rest to passengers of the boats and wagons. The following year, the Wheeling Suspension Bridge was completed across the Ohio River. As a result, Wheeling’s business really took off and as did Marsh’s. In 1848, Marsh developed what became the icon, the Stogie. At the time, the cheapest cigars were Boston Cheroots selling for $3.50 to $4.00 per thousand. They also were made out of scraps. Mifflin came up with an affordable long filler cigar named in honor of the Conestoga wagons that traveled through Wheeling taking pioneers and settlers out into the west. The Marsh Wheeling Stogie was the result, measuring 7 inches with a 34-ring gauge. (And yes, the use of the word stogie today to mean a cigar comes from the Marsh Wheeling Stogie.) Marsh also came up with the slogan because of the Stogie’s length “longer enjoyment.”

      Cigar manufacturer, M. Marsh & Son, invented the brand "Marsh Wheeling Stogie". M.Marsh & Son invented the Marsh Wheeling Stogie brand because it was initially marketed to conestoga wagon drivers on the National Road between Baltimore and Wheeling.

  6. Sep 2020
    1. Interestingly, global cessation of dreaming has been associated with damage to either frontal or parietal cortex [85].

      İlginç bir şekilde, rüyanın küresel olarak kesilmesi, frontal veya parietal korteksin hasarıyla ilişkilendirilmiştir.

  7. Nov 2019
    1. ce sont toutes des vibrations

      Lumière et son sont des ondes qu’on peut moduler et qui peuvent prendre différentes formes.

    2. je veux que ça fasse partie de la scénographie

      <mark>La conception sonore fait partie de la scénographie</mark>; elle ne fait pas simplement se juxtaposer à elle.

    3. je n’ai pas de préférence entre le numérique, l’analogique ou le mécanique, j’utilise tout

      On exploite les outils appropriés; on ne se limite pas à une technique par pure préférence (« j’aime le son vinyle ») ou ignorance (« je ne connais rien à la technologie »).

    4. radioastronomie pour recueillir des signaux radio provenant des trous noir, pour ensuite les transformer en de la parole

      Transdisciplinarité inusitée, mais ô combien intéressante, entre physique, technologie et conception sonore!

      (Pourquoi pas, d’ailleurs)

    5. vrai son de fluides qui se font pomper, et de vrais corps

      Authentiques matériaux sonores – pas des simulacres!

    6. tout travailler conjointement

      Le concepteur sonore et le metteur en scène travaillent conjointement, et non isolément.

  8. Aug 2018
    1. O Father, what intends thy hand, she cry'd, Against thy only Son?

      This is confusing. Apparently (at least according to study guides), this female Goblin is Sin, who actually happens to be the daughter of Satan. Daughter, not son. So it sounds like she is addressing not her father, but God the father, who as we learn later is about to let his Son die for mankind. Or could she be referring to Satan as the Son who has turned against his own father? Or the incestuosly bread son of Satan and his own daughter, who happens to be Death? But then again, is Satan outwitting Death? Is anyone clear about what's going on here?

  9. Jul 2018
    1. “I support a social transition for a kid who is in distress and needs to live in a different way. And I do so because I am very focused on what the child needs at that time,” said Johanna Olson-Kennedy, medical director of the Center for Transyouth Health and Development at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, the largest transgender youth clinic in the United States with some 750 patients. A social transition to the other gender helps children learn, make friends, and participate in family activities. Some will decide later they are not transgender, but Olson-Kennedy says the potential harm in such cases may be overstated.

      This is one of the major problems in how so many approach this whole issue weather as a topic or in deciding a course of action for their own child. Furthermore the possibility of that happiness now rests on either on secrecy and passing or as is more often the case today it rests on the cooperation and orchestration of a comprehensive enough segment of the total people with whom your child is interacting to support this transition. What if we did that for gay kids. How much different would things be if tital 9 applied to all gender nonconforming kids even those who identified as gay? What if 12 states didn't have laws against speaking positively about gay as an identity in schools. What if parents where expected to do the work to insure that a self identified gay student was provided a social network for similarly identified adults and young people. And for just about any teen how might life be different emotionally speaking if we had been chemically castrated during our teen years. What if gay kids had the same wealth of support materials - public discourse etc. The reaason they don't is because we can not deal with their difference and we can not deal with it being about their sexual desire because we are unnerved by a the fact that children can identify and feel and act on sexual interests at a very young age. Gay kids know this and that is a big hurdle to comming out. I wished so much to have a boyfirend then I felt I could come out because it wouldn't mean telling my parents that I think about boys in a sexual way but I love this boy and won't deny him to anyone. No sad to say as was noted when oposition was initially raised amoung APA members over the introduction of GID to the DSM when they stated that it may just be that gay is a normal healthy worthy course of human development that as part of that process involves being in some way emotionally maimed by which they meant that there are certain painfull encounters with being different than ones own parents and most people in your community that gay people by dfinitioon must edure and untill society changes being gay is known to be a bad undesirable thing by children at a tremendously young age. So to be and develop as a person who is homosexual is not going to happen without certain paiuns and obsticles that others can easily avoid and mostly do.

  10. Nov 2016
    1. 2. The Quality of the Scan Scanners make a digital representation of visual input. The quality and type of output it is able to produce, will have an effect on the quality of the input provided to the OCR engine to process. Software programs (like the Image Capture dialog in Paperless) make it possible for the user to alter the visual properties (such as brightness and contrast) of the scanner's output. One of the biggest factors is DPI or Dots per Inch. Setting the DPI lower than 200 will yield uninteligible results wheras setting it higher than 600dpi will just increase the size of the stored file without yielding much better results. We tend to recommend a 300dpi for in item. Color vs. Black and White, vs. grayscale depends on your source material. Often times documents and receipts will not need to be stored in Color (as it makes the storage file larger) but the difference between B&W and grayscale can be profound depending on the source. In general, a grayscale image will provide a better result than a black and white image. Internally, the software performs adaptive binarization where it changes a grayscale image to a black and white image if this process is already done, presumably by your scanner software) it's possible some fidelity will be lost and the OCR results may suffer.
  11. Sep 2015
  12. Jul 2015
    1. fear lived on in their practiced bop, their slouching denim, their big T- shirts, the calculated angle of their baseball caps

      These clothes often are stereotypes of urban bodies for black youth. In contrast, I would say that the opposite response of polo shirts, bow ties, and conforming attire that many black boys wear in an effort to fit in with the dominant culture--through assimilation--is also a form of fear.

    2. The question is unanswerable, which is not to say futile.

      Is the answer undefined because respect for our common humanity has no specific path? Each person must find his or her own terms of connection with every individual since we combat tendencies in varied ways when we encounter our differences.

      Perhaps, when we struggle to define difference as either weakness or strength, we open the door for the challenge of racism and other social inequities. Perhaps difference, when counted as a necessary glue--a common bond--to elevate humans to being more collectively than who we are individually, is what we grapple with because we see it as isolating when we should see it as our hope for attaining our greatest human character once we see difference as a function of our collective wealth--our interdependence on each other--rather than our independence to stand in contrast to one another.

    3. This legacy

      legacy = heritage = systemic inequity = cloaked hoods reminiscent of the hoods worn by KKK and their ideological superiority

    4. the police departments of your country have been endowed with the authority to destroy your body

      I am hesitant to place this broad sense of authority on the police department. I do not think it is a department; instead, I believe it to be people cloaked in masks of justice Some believe in a false image of of others based on color: they see color and not a person, an image and not a heart, a stereotype and not a son or a daughter.

      When the person in uniform starts seeing problems and not people, they take on the systemic, divisive heritage of inequity that manifests itself in racists, sexists, social hierarchies that destroy the humanity in all of us.

    5. the Dream rests on our backs

      If a people's wealth, being, or privilege is based on standing on the backs of others, the struggle or jeopardy of the situation is that they are living on uncertain time--a time that will disappear once those who are on their backs eventually stand straight. For those who stand on the backs of others, they have not known true work for what they have attained since they have not earned what they have by their own efforts--at least not on the basis of their own grit and determination that emerged from their personal character of inner strength and resilience. They must live lives continually wondering when the dream will end, when the property will be returned to those who have rightfully fought for what is in the hands of a usurping group.

      A usurped dream is a delusion, a farce, a hoax, that survives on borrowed time, terms, and values. For those who benefit from its ongoing perpetuation, the dream is more of a pending nightmare.

    6. I would have you be a conscious citizen of this terrible and beautiful world.

      Yes

    7. I am not a cynic. I love you, and I love the world, and I love it more with every new inch I discover. But you are a black boy, and you must be responsible for your body in a way that other boys cannot know.

      A powerful lesson .. a truth in America ... and a gift from a father to a son that all that comes before leads to ...

    8. Never forget that we were enslaved in this country longer than we have been free. Never forget that for 250 years black people were born into chains—whole generations followed by more generations who knew nothing but chains.

      I saw this reference in a review of the book ... amazing to think about ...

    9. I have raised you to respect every human being as singular, and you must extend that same respect into the past.

      A great lesson ...

    10. I, like every kid I knew, loved The Dukes of Hazzard. But I would have done well to think more about why two outlaws, driving a car named the General Lee, must necessarily be portrayed as “just some good ole boys, never meanin’ no harm”—a mantra for the Dreamers if there ever was one.

      How did we all get hooked into that show and its underlying narrative?

    11. But my history professors thought nothing of telling me that my search for myth was doomed, that the stories I wanted to tell myself could not be matched to truths.

      What? Is that true? or perception of the past?

    12. Why are they showing this to us? Why were only our heroes nonviolent?

      Interesting ... and this is what we show and explain in school today, too, right? Peaceful protest ...

    13. I knew that my portion of the American galaxy, where bodies were enslaved by a tenacious gravity, was black and that the other, liberated portion was not. I knew that some inscrutable energy preserved the breach.

      This seems to be the center of this whole piece, in my opinion.

    14. To be black in the Baltimore of my youth was to be naked before the elements of the world, before all the guns, fists, knives, crack, rape, and disease. The law did not protect us.

      This was the reality of despair. Or is the reality of despair. How do we fix this? How?

    15. There is nothing uniquely evil in these destroyers

      I don't agree. Maybe not uniquely. But evil, nonetheless.

    16. What I told you is what your grandparents tried to tell me: that this is your country, that this is your world, that this is your body, and you must find some way to live within the all of it.

      Man. Powerful moment. I can see him. I can see his son. I see the shadows of history. And even in the sadness, I see something .. a glimmer. Perhaps, as a father, I am projecting. So be it. This is one of those moments, the lesson that will linger.

    17. I was sad for you

      This phrase makes the political so personal, as he intends. It really hits the heartstrings .. and I feel like I am intruding here, don't you? As if I shouldn't be reading this talk between father and son ... as if annotating in the margins is infringing on that bond that the writing is creating. Or is that me?

    18. And I remembered that I had expected to fail.

      This is a sad commentary on our times, when such an articulate man either can't find the words, or has the words but know they won't matter. Or something else I am not privy to.

    19. JUL 4, 2015

      Hard not to relate this piece to another great statement of African American experience: Frederick Douglass's 1841 speech “What to the Slave Is the Fourth of July?”

      Image Description

    20. lose my body

      I'm just trying to imagine how it might make Coates son squirm to have his dad talk to him about his body. I guess I'm squirming a bit too. I'm expecting to hear about racism, but here I'm being asked to think about a body.

  13. May 2015
  14. Apr 2015
  15. Mar 2015
  16. Feb 2015
  17. Jan 2015