72 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2022
    1. Set the endpoint to Mailgun's Postbin. A Postbin is a web service that allows you to post data, which is then displayed through a browser. This allows you to quickly determine what is actually being transmitted to Mailgun's API.
    1. Trope, trope, trope, strung into a Gish Gallop.

      One of the issues we see in the Sunday morning news analysis shows (Meet the Press, Face the Nation, et al.) is that there is usually a large amount of context collapse mixed with lack of general knowledge about the topics at hand compounded with large doses of Gish Gallop and F.U.D. (fear, uncertainty, and doubt).

    1. The several panels show what happens in each cycle. Each cycle consists of a denaturation step at a temperature higher than the melting temperature of the duplex DNA (e.g. 95 oC ), then an annealing step at a temperature below the melting temperature for the primer-template (e.g. 55 oC), followed by extension of the primer by DNA polymerase using dNTPs provided in the reaction. This is done at the temperature optimum for the DNA polymerase (e.g. 70 oC for a thermostable polymerase). Thermocylers are commercially available for carrying out many cycles quickly and reliably
      • Denature
      • Annealing primer
      • Synthesize new DNA with polymerase
      • High speed
      • Extreme sensitivity
  2. Jul 2022
    1. I may had to turn it off and on again a few times as debugging technique when I had no other ideas on what to do.
    1. In this high-speed PCB design guide, we will encapsulate the high-speed PCB layout techniques, high-speed layout guidelines to help designers.

      Would you like to speed up the performance of your product?

      With innovative and fast electric equipment, designers and engineers can speed up the product. Not only this, you need a high speed PCB run faster.

      Read the blog further to understand the rules and challenges of high-speed PCB design.

  3. May 2022
    1. The student doesn’t have a strong preference for any of these archetypes. Their notes serve a clear purpose that’s often based on a short-term priority (e.g, writing a paper or passing a test), with the goal to “get it done” as simply as possible.

      The typical student note taking method of transcribing, using (or often not using at all), and keeping notes is doomed to failure.

      Many students make the mistake of not making their own actual notes. By this I don't mean they're not writing information down. In fact many are writing information down, but we can't really call these notes. Notes by definition ought to transform something seen or heard into one's own words. Without the transformation, these students think that they're taking notes, but in reality they're focusing their efforts on being transcriptionists. They're attempting to capture something for later consumption. This is a deadly trap! By only transcribing, they're not taking advantage of transforming information by putting ideas down in their own words to test their understanding. Often worse, even if they do transcribe notes, they don't revisit them. If they do revisit them, they're simply re-reading them and not actively working with them. Only re-reading them will lead to the illusion that they're learning something when in fact they're falling into the mere-exposure effect.

      Students who are acting as transcriptionists would be better off simply reading a textbook and taking notes directly from that.

      A note that isn't revisited or revised, may as well be a note not taken. If we were to consider a spectrum of useful, valuable, and worthwhile notes, these notes would be at the lowest end of the spectrum.

      link to: https://hypothes.is/a/QgkL6IkIEeym7OeN9v9New

  4. Apr 2022
    1. Researchdemonstrates that students who engage in active learning acquire a deeperunderstanding of the material, score higher on exams, and are less likely to failor drop out.

      Active learning is a pedagogical structure whereby a teacher presents a problem to a group of students and has them (usually in smaller groups) collectively work on the solutions together. By talking and arguing amongst themselves they actively learn together not only how to approach problems, but to come up with their own solutions. Teachers can then show the correct answer, discuss why it was right and explain how the alternate approaches may have gone wrong. Research indicates that this approach helps provide a deeper understanding of the materials presented this way, that students score higher on exams and are less likely to either fail or drop out of these courses.

      Active learning sounds very similar to the sorts of approaches found in flipped classrooms. Is the overlap between the two approaches the same, or are there parts of the Venn diagrams of the two that differ, and, if so, how do they differ? Which portions are more beneficial?

      Does this sort of active learning approach also help to guard against "group think" as the result of comparing solutions from various groups? How might this be applied to democracy? Would separate versions of committees that then convene to compare notes and come up with solutions improve the quality of solutions?

    2. A 2019 study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy ofSciences supports Wieman’s hunch. Tracking the intellectual advancement ofseveral hundred graduate students in the sciences over the course of four years,its authors found that the development of crucial skills such as generatinghypotheses, designing experiments, and analyzing data was closely related to thestudents’ engagement with their peers in the lab, and not to the guidance theyreceived from their faculty mentors.

      Learning has been shown to be linked to engagement with peers in social situations over guidance from faculty mentors.

      Cross reference: David F. Feldon et al., “Postdocs’ Lab Engagement Predicts Trajectories of PhD Students’ Skill Development,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 116 (October 2019): 20910–16


      Are there areas where this is not the case? Are there areas where this is more the case than not?

      Is it our evolution as social animals that has heightened this effect? How could this be shown? (Link this to prior note about social evolution.)

      Is it the ability to scaffold out questions and answers and find their way by slowly building up experience with each other that facilitates this effect?

      Could this effect be seen in annotating texts as well? If one's annotations become a conversation with the author, is there a learning benefit even when the author can't respond? By trying out writing about one's understanding of a text and seeing where the gaps are and then revisiting the text to fill them in, do we gain this same sort of peer engagement? How can we encourage students to ask questions to the author and/or themselves in the margins? How can we encourage them to further think about and explore these questions? Answer these questions over time?

      A key part of the solution is not just writing the annotations down in the first place, but keeping them, reviewing over them, linking them together, revisiting them and slowly providing answers and building solutions for both themselves and, by writing them down, hopefully for others as well.

    3. a phenomenon that psychologists call “thecaricature advantage”: the fact that we recognize a caricatured face even morereadily than we recognize a true-to-life depiction. While a caricature does distortits subject’s actual appearance, it does so in a systematic way, exaggerating whatis unique or distinctive about that individual—thereby making him or her evenmore instantly identifiable.

      Exaggerating the features of people and objects in systematic ways helps people to more easily assimilate both knowledge about them as well as the ability to distinguish between them in an effect which psychologists call the "caricature advantage."

      Link this to using caricature as a mnemonic technique for strengthening one's memory of objects and people.

  5. Mar 2022
    1. MY LECTURE NOTES

      Elizabeth Filips has digital versions of medical school notes online. She's drawn them (in software) by hand with color and occasional doodles in them (there's an image of Einstein's head with an E=mc^2 under it on one page) which makes them more memorable for having made them in the first place, but with the color and the pictures, they act as a memory palace.

      I've found no evidence (yet) that she's using direct mnemonics or that she's been specifically trained in the method of loci or other techniques. This doesn't, however, mean that she's not tangentially using them without knowing about them explicitly.

      One would suspect that this sort of evolutionary movement towards such techniques would have been how they evolved in the first place.

    1. There was a statue still present, not of Baal, but apparently of a god with the head of dog-eared baboon, the representative of the god Thoth, lending credence to the astronomical theory of the pool’s function, Nigro says.

      The presence of a chimerical animal is a potential indicator of mnemonic techniques at work in Phoenician culture.

    1. Back then, Macedonia foundherself increasingly frustrated with the conventional format of foreign-languagecourses: a lot of sitting, listening, and writing. That’s not how anyone learnstheir native language, she notes. Young children encounter new words in a richsensorimotor context: as they hear the word “apple,” they see and touch theshiny red fruit; they may even bring it to their mouth, tasting its sweet flesh andsmelling its crisp scent. All of these many hooks for memory are missing fromthe second-language classroom.

      Most foreign language leaners spend all their time in classrooms or at home sitting down, listening, reading, and writing. This is antithetical to how children acquire language in more natural settings where they're able to move around, interact, taste, touch, smell, etc. as they learn new words in their language. These additional sensory mnemonic techniques add an incredible amount of information and associative hooks to help them remember new words and grammatical structures.

    2. Kerry Ann Dickson, an associate professor of anatomy and cell biology atVictoria University in Australia, makes use of all three of these hooks when sheteaches. Instead of memorizing dry lists of body parts and systems, her studentspractice pretending to cry (the gesture that corresponds to the lacrimal gland/tearproduction), placing their hands behind their ears (cochlea/hearing), and swayingtheir bodies (vestibular system/balance). They feign the act of chewing(mandibular muscles/mastication), as well as spitting (salivary glands/salivaproduction). They act as if they were inserting a contact lens, as if they werepicking their nose, and as if they were engaging in “tongue-kissing” (motionsthat represent the mucous membranes of the eye, nose, and mouth, respectively).Dickson reports that students’ test scores in anatomy are 42 percent higher whenthey are taught with gestures than when taught the terms on their own.

      Example of the use of visual, auditory, and proprioceptive methods used in the pedagogy of anatomy.

    3. There isthe auditory hook: we hear ourselves saying the words aloud. There is the visualhook: we see ourselves making the relevant gesture. And there is the“proprioceptive” hook; this comes from feeling our hands make the gesture

      Gestural mnemonic associations work on three levels: auditory associations, visual associations, and proprioceptive associations.

    4. Research shows that moving our hands advances our understanding ofabstract or complex concepts, reduces our cognitive load, and improves ourmemory.

      movement and gesture as a mnemonic device

    5. Gesture encourages experimentation.”

      —Susan Goldin-Meadow

      Can teachers encourage gesture as a means of helping their students learn? How might this be done?

  6. Feb 2022
    1. Even thoughelaboration works verifiably well for deep understanding, it might notbe the best choice if you just want to learn isolated encyclopaedicfacts (Rivard 1994).

      For deep understanding the elaboration method may be the best tool, but may not be the best choice for learning isolated encyclopedic facts.


      By learning isolated facts do they really mean memorizing here? In which case, perhaps using mnemotechniques is the best way to create synthetic associative links by which to tie one's knowledge into their other mental frameworks of knowledge. If thought about this way one is really elaborating their knowledge in a synthetic manner instead of more naturally. Either way, you're doing some form of elaborating as a means of assuming the knowledge. Both forms are work, though slightly different.

    2. We face here the same choice between methods that make us feellike we learned something and methods that truly do make us learnsomething.

      What methods of studying actually make us learn something versus make us feel as if we've learned something?

      Active reading, progressive summarization may be on this list while highlighting and underlining might not. Or perhaps there's a spectrum of poor to good, and if this is the case, what does it look like? Is it the same for everyone or are factors like neurodivergence part of the equation which might change this spectrum of learning methods and techniques?

    1. https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2022-02-09/riverside-sohcahtoa-teacher-viral-video-mocked-native-americans-fired

      Riverside teacher who dressed up and mocked Native Americans for a trigonometry lesson involving a mnemonic using SOH CAH TOA in Riverside, CA is fired.

      There is a right way to teach mnemonic techniques and a wrong way. This one took the advice to be big and provocative went way overboard. The children are unlikely to forget the many lessons (particularly the social one) contained here.

      It's unfortunate that this could have potentially been a chance to bring indigenous memory methods into a classroom for a far better pedagogical and cultural outcome. Sad that the methods are so widely unknown that media missed a good teaching moment here.

      referenced video:

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bu4fulKVv2c

      A snippet at the end of the video has the teacher talking to rocks and a "rock god", but it's extremely unlikely that she was doing so using indigenous methods or for indigenous reasons.

      read: 7:00 AM

  7. Jan 2022
    1. Survivals of this spatially oriented technique still mark our language when we say “in the first place” and “passing on to the next point.”

      The use of mnemonic techniques through history have been crystalized into our language with phrases like "in the first place" and "passing on to the next point".

  8. Nov 2021
    1. Over the years in academic settings I've picked up pieces of Spanish, French, Latin and a few odd and ends of other languages.

      Six years ago we put our daughter into a dual immersion Japanese program (in the United States) and it has changed some of my view of how we teach and learn languages, a process which is also affected by my slowly picking up conversational Welsh using the method at https://www.saysomethingin.com/ over the past year and change, a hobby which I wish I had more targeted time for.

      Children learn language through a process of contextual use and osmosis which is much more difficult for adults. I've found that the slowly guided method used by SSiW is fairly close to this method, but is much more targeted. They'll say a few words in the target language and give their English equivalents, then they'll provide phrases and eventually sentences in English and give you a few seconds to form them into the target language with the expectation that you try to say at least something, or pause the program to do your best. It's okay if you mess up even repeatedly, they'll say the correct phrase/sentence two times after which you'll repeat it again thus giving you three tries at it. They'll also repeat bits from one lesson to the next, so you'll eventually get it, the key is not to worry too much about perfection.

      Things slowly build using this method, but in even about 10 thirty minute lessons, you'll have a pretty strong grasp of fluent conversational Welsh equivalent to a year or two of college level coursework. Your work on this is best supplemented with interacting with native speakers and/or watching television or reading in the target language as much as you're able to.

      For those who haven't experienced it before I'd recommend trying out the method at https://www.saysomethingin.com/welsh/course1/intro to hear it firsthand.

      The experience will give your brain a heavy work out and you'll feel mentally tired after thirty minutes of work, but it does seem to be incredibly effective. A side benefit is that over time you'll also build up a "gut feeling" about what to say and how without realizing it. This is something that's incredibly hard to get in most university-based or book-based language courses.

      This method will give you quicker grammar acquisition and you'll speak more like a native, but your vocabulary acquisition will tend to be slower and you don't get any writing or spelling practice. This can be offset with targeted memory techniques and spaced repetition/flashcards or apps like Duolingo that may help supplement one's work.

      I like some of the suggestions made in Lynne's post as I've been pecking away at bits of Japanese over time myself. There's definitely an interesting structure to what's going on, especially with respect to the kana and there are many similarities to what is happening in Japanese to the Chinese that she's studying. I'm also approaching it from a more traditional university/book-based perspective, but if folks have seen or heard of a SSiW repetition method, I'd love to hear about it.

      Hopefully helpful by comparison, I'll mention a few resources I've found for Japanese that I've researched on setting out a similar path that Lynne seems to be moving.

      Japanese has two different, but related alphabets and using an app like Duolingo with regular practice over less than a week will give one enough experience that trying to use traditional memory techniques may end up wasting more time than saving, especially if one expects to be practicing regularly in both the near and the long term. If you're learning without the expectation of actively speaking, writing, or practicing the language from time to time, then wholesale mnemotechniques may be the easier path, but who really wants to learn a language like this?

      The tougher portion of Japanese may come in memorizing the thousands of kanji which can have subtly different meanings. It helps to know that there are a limited set of specific radicals with a reasonably delineable structure of increasing complexity of strokes and stroke order.

      The best visualization I've found for this fact is the Complete Listing of the 214 Radicals and Major Variations from An Introduction to Japanese Kanji Calligraphy by Kunii Takezaki (Tuttle, 2005) which I copy below:

      A chart of Japanese radicals in columns by number, character, and radical name & variations with a legend for reading the chart

      (Feel free to right click and view the image in another tab or download it and view it full size to see more detail.)

      I've not seen such a chart in any of the dozens of other books I've come across. The numbered structure of increasing complexity of strokes here would certainly suggest an easier to build memory palace or songline.

      I love this particular text as it provides an excellent overview of what is structurally happening in Japanese with lots of tidbits that are otherwise much harder won in reading other books.

      There are many kanji books with various forms of what I would call very low level mnemonic aids. I've not found one written or structured by what I would consider a professional mnemonist. One of the best structured ones I've seen is A Guide to Remembering Japanese Characters by Kenneth G. Henshall (Tuttle, 1988). It's got some great introductory material and then a numbered list of kanji which would suggest the creation of a quite long memory palace/journey/songline.

      Each numbered Kanji has most of the relevant data and readings, but provides some description about how the kanji relates or links to other words of similar shapes/meanings and provides a mnemonic hint to make placing it in one's palace a bit easier. Below is an example of the sixth which will give an idea as to the overall structure.

      I haven't gotten very far into it yet, but I'd found an online app called WaniKani for Japanese that has some mnemonic suggestions and built-in spaced repetition that looks incredibly promising for taking small radicals and building them up into more easily remembered complex kanji.

      I suspect that there are likely similar sources for these couple of books and apps for Chinese that may help provide a logical overall structuring which will make it easier to apply or adapt one's favorite mnemotechniques to make the bulk vocabulary memorization easier.

      The last thing I'll mention I've found, that's good for practicing writing by hand as well as spaced repetition is a Kanji notebook frequently used by native Japanese speaking children as they're learning the levels of kanji in each grade. It's non-obvious to the English speaker, and took me a bit to puzzle out and track down a commercially printed one, even with a child in a classroom that was using a handmade version. The notebook (left to right and top to bottom) has sections for writing a big example of the learned kanji; spaces for the "Kun" and "On" readings; spaces for the number of strokes and the radical pieces; a section for writing out the stroke order as it builds up gradually; practice boxes for repeated practice of writing the whole kanji; examples of how to use the kanji in context; and finally space for the student to compose their own practice sentences using the new kanji.

      Regular use and practice with these can be quite helpful for moving toward mastery.

      I also can't emphasize enough that regularly and actively watching, listening, reading, and speaking in the target language with materials that one finds interesting is incredibly valuable. As an example, one of the first things I did for Welsh was to find a streaming television and radio that I want to to watch/listen to on a regular basis has been helpful. Regular motivation and encouragement is key.

      I won't go into them in depth and will leave them to speak for themselves, but two of the more intriguing videos I've watched on language acquisition which resonate with some of my experiences are:

  9. Sep 2021
    1. I want to mix sketch-noting and typing; to insert quick hand-drawn illustrations into my notes such that I can edit those sketches later.

      It dawns on me that in some sense small illustrations and images in a mnemonic like manner are what Dave Winer is doing on his blog.

  10. Jul 2021
    1. in my case having the browser clearing it's network-tab and the reason for the next request beeing due to "Initiator: document" should have been a clue. (meaning: it's not done by some JS, but by some html functionality)
  11. Jun 2021
    1. He concludes his memory section by defendingvisual mnemonics against authorities like Erasmus who doubt its efficacy.

      Why might Erasmus have doubted its efficacy? Did he use it? Attempt to? Did he have some sort of cognitive defect that may have made it difficult/impossible for him in particular?

    2. He suggests using beasts that stand for letters of the alphabet, andthen assigning images to various parts of each animal—“in the Head, the Bellie, in the Taile, in theformer parte of the legges, & also in the hinder part.”

      I've not often seen (yet?) suggestions of using bestiaries as mnemonic techniques, but here's one in Charles Butler's Oratoriae Libri Duo.

      What other sources used them this way before or after?

      To be clear I'm aware of their use for such, but just haven't read much about them in this period for this particular purpose in these settings.

    3. Wilson next exploresAd Herennium’stechnique of visual homophony, such as remembering a man named Wingfeelde by picturing“thewing of a birde, and a greene feelde to walke in.”

      The use of [[visual homophony]] as a [[mnemonic techniques]].

    4. Methodaids the mental grasping—the memory—of the complex content with which one is engaged; it“relieve[s]theburdenplacedonmemory,”writes Sharon Crowley,“by calling on the assistance of reason”(35).

      I definitely use reason as a memory technique this way.

  12. May 2021
    1. This approach also splits email development for modern email clients and older clients in two. You can use Safari/Chrome to test and develop modern techniques for WebKit-supported clients while using Firefox for your baseline experience for older clients like Outlook.
    2. This media query only targets WebKit-supported email clients—which have incredible support for HTML5 and CSS3. This media query allows you to use of modern techniques like HTML5 video, CSS3 animation, web fonts, and more.
    1. Although a lot of email development is stuck in the past, that doesn’t mean we can’t modernize our campaigns right along with our websites. Many of these tips can be baked right into your email boilerplate or code snippets, allowing you to create more accessible HTML emails without too much thought.
  13. Apr 2021
    1. Among the many responses to my request for a mnemonic sentencefore, the following seemed to me particularly noteworthy:To expresse, remember to memorize a sentence to simplify this.( John L. Greene, Beverly Hills, California.)To disrupt a playroom is commonly a practice of children.( Joseph J. Guiteras, Baldwinsville, New York.)By omnibus I traveled to Brooklyn. (David Mage, New York, NewYo r k . )It enables a numskull to memorize a quantity of numerals. (GeneWidhoff, Burbank, California.)TheEnciclopedia universal ilustrada, in an article on “Mnemo-tecnia,” gives the following Spanish sentence fore:Te ayudar arecordar la cantidad a indoctos si relesme bien. Several Italian versesforewill be found on page 755 ofMatematica Dilettevole e Curiosaby Italo Ghersi.

      Mnemonic sentences for the number e.

    2. I know of no similar aids in English to recalle, the other commontranscendental number. However, if you memorizeeto five deci-mal places (2.71828), you automatically know it to nine, becausethe last four digits obligingly repeat themselves (2.718281828). InFranceeis memorized to 10 places by the traditional memory aid:Tu aideras rappeler ta quantit beaucoup de docteurs amis.Perhapssome reader can construct an amusing English sentence that willcarryeto at least 20 decimals.

    Tags

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  14. Mar 2021
    1. Semantic domains are the foundational concept for initial stages of vernacular dictionary building projects.
    2. This uses techniques such as SIL International's Dictionary Development Process (DDP),[4][5] RapidWords, or software such as WeSay[6] or FLEx. These techniques rely on extensive lists of semantic domains that are relevant to vernacular languages.
    1. If you built vim against Qt rather than GTK+ and python-complete still isn't working, that suggests the problem isn't actually a consequence of trying to link to both GTK+2 and GTK+3.
    1. If still doesn't work. Make desktop file runnable in terminal by changing Terminal=true, and put it inside a bash script. Run the script to catch the error output. Change back when errors are corrected.
    1. I used this in the console to find the file and the line of the error (took it from this answer): JS_PATH = "app/assets/javascripts/**/*.js"; Dir[JS_PATH].each do |file_name| puts "\n#{file_name}" puts Uglifier.compile(File.read(file_name)) end

      Didn't work for me because it was actually a .coffee file.

      So I tried something similar with this:

      main > Dir["*/assets/javascripts/**/*.coffee"].each { |file_name| puts "\n#{file_name}"; Sprockets::CoffeeScriptProcessor.(filename: file_name, data: File.read(file_name), cache: {}); }
      
      app/assets/javascripts/bootstrapped.js.coffee
      NoMethodError: undefined method `config' for nil:NilClass
      from /home/tyler/.gem/ruby/2.7.1/gems/sprockets-4.0.2/lib/sprockets/source_map_utils.rb:40:in `format_source_map'
      

      but it wasn't as trivial to provide the necessary environment that Sprockets wants.

      But that's okay, when better_errors paused on the exception, I just jumped to the

      block in Sprockets::CoffeeScriptProcessor.call
      sprockets (4.0.2) lib/sprockets/coffee_script_processor.rb, line 24
      

      frame and evaluated

      input[:filename]
      

      to figure out which file had failed.

      Obviously this information should be part of the error message itself though!!

  15. Jan 2021
  16. atomiks.github.io atomiks.github.io
    1. It's highly recommended you inspect a tippy element via your browser's DevTools. An easy way to do this is to give it hideOnClick: false and trigger: 'click' props so that it stays visible when focus is switched to the DevTools window.
    1. LogRocket is a frontend application monitoring solution that lets you replay problems as if they happened in your own browser. Instead of guessing why errors happen, or asking users for screenshots and log dumps, LogRocket lets you replay the session to quickly understand what went wrong. It works perfectly with any app, regardless of framework, and has plugins to log additional context from Redux, Vuex, and @ngrx/store. In addition to logging Redux actions and state, LogRocket records console logs, JavaScript errors, stacktraces, network requests/responses with headers + bodies, browser metadata, and custom logs. It also instruments the DOM to record the HTML and CSS on the page, recreating pixel-perfect videos of even the most complex single-page apps.
  17. Dec 2020
    1. Constructing Noah’s Arkis representative of a genre, traditional in Hugh’s time andmilieu, of meditational compositions based on the various buildings whose plans aredescribed in the Bible. These included, most notably, the Tabernacle in Exodus 25ff, Solo-mon’s Temple in 1 Kings 6, the Temple and its platform in Ezekiel’s vision (Ezekiel 40ff ),the Heavenly Jerusalem of Revelation 20, and Noah’s Ark (Genesis 6). All these structures,including the Ark, were analyzed as avatars of one another, and of Christ and the Church,following the statement in Hebrews 8: 2–6 that Christ is the true tabernacle, the patternof the structure revealed to Moses. One of the earliest representatives of the genre stillextant is Gregory the Great’s set of sermons on Ezekiel 40, though there is good reasonto believe that its origins lie in the meditational practice of the early desert fathers andin Jewish spiritual traditions of the first century.

      Cross reference this with the retranslation of the Temple by In the Footsteps of King David.

      The real (open) question is did this memory tradition date back to the time of David, or was it applied (or reapplied) by classical scholars after the first century? Was it transmitted in oral tradition until put back into writing in the new millenium?

    1. Practice drinking your coffee mindfully, washing your hands mindfully, walking mindfully, folding clothes mindfully, washing dishes mindfully. [And] this simply means while you are doing those things, bring your full attention to it. You are simply training your brain to focus on what’s happening right in front of you, right here [and] now

      The key to meditation is to train your brain to focus on the now.

      This means you can do more than just focus on your breath. Focus on the tea you're drinking, the words you're reading, the feeling of your clothing, and so on.

  18. Nov 2020
    1. Intrinsic motivation is the act of doing something without any obvious external rewards. You do it because it’s enjoyable and interesting, rather than because of an outside incentive or pressure to do it, such as a reward or deadline. An example of intrinsic motivation would be reading a book because you enjoy reading and have an interest in the story or subject, rather than reading because you have to write a report on it to pass a class.

      In my prompt for What are the [[components of motivation]] - which is a prompt that came from [[The 3 Components of Motivation (highlights)]] I had initially put down

      • [[Intrinsic Motivation]]
      • [[Extrinsic Motives]]
      • Abilities, or [[Perceived abilities]]
  19. Oct 2020
    1. A nice hook to pull one into some of the reasons why one would want to pick up languages as well as how to do so.

      8:44 method of loci (locorum)

      10:02 Learning words in groups based on related sounds.

      11:22 Why learn languages? Motivation

      Language represents a world cultural view.

  20. Sep 2020
  21. Aug 2020
  22. Jan 2020
    1. These are mined in Brazil, Canada, Finland, Russia, South Africa and Zimbabwe. Phosphate rock is mined mostly by surface methods using draglines and bucket wheel excavators for large deposits and power shovels or earthmovers for smaller deposits.

      This clip is about where Phosphorus is mined and how it is mined. Phosphorus is mined in many different places around the world.

    1. If you enable the -v switch to ssh you can see what's going on: 1st command: debug1: Sending command: /bin/sh -c "cd /boot && ls -l"
    1. git -c core.sshCommand="ssh -vvv" pull

      This seems like the most reliable and direct way to enable debugging of the ssh connection (authentication, etc.) used by a git command.

  23. Dec 2019
    1. If none of these commands identified the duplication, try analyzing your bundle for multiple instances of @material-ui/styles. You can just check your bundle source, or use a tool like source-map-explorer or webpack-bundle-analyzer.
    2. server-side rendering is strict about configuration, and the best way to find out what's wrong is to compare your project to an already working setup. Check out the reference implementations, bit by bit.
    1. Step 1. Get comfortable. Get a pen.

      Step 2. Four questions before you read and during. Goal to find answer.

      2:26 Q1. What's the point? (Vad diskuteras?)

      i.e.: What is the issue or question that drives this book? What area is it in? Why is being written?

      2:30 Q2 Why did they bother? (Varför diskuteras det?)

      i.e. Motivation. What do they want to you think or believe?

      2:49 Q3 What are they trying to prove? (Vad försöker de övertyga dig om?)

      i.e. Thesis. What they are trying to convince you to believe, what they are trying to get you to share.

      2:55 Q4 How are they trying to prove it? (Hur försöker de övertyga dig om det?)

      i.e. Evidence, arguments in favor

      Step 3. Interrogate the text.

      Detective looking for clues, find answer to the four questions

      • Read blurb
      • Read inside jacket copy or back cover
      • First and last paragraph of the book
      • First and last paragraph of each chapter
      • First and last paragraph of the section working on for current day/week
      • Review what you have found: What should you expect to find when you study this further?

      Step 4. Fast read.

      Overall movement and architecture of work.

      Mark with pen. Draw horizontal line at break in text, e.g. when author says that "Now we are finished with this question."

      5:15 Step 5. Slow, careful read.

      Go through text paragraph by paragraph, annotate with pen, trying to find answers to the four questions.

      Annotate:

      • Structural clues: introduction, thesis, outline of the argument
      • Write numbers in the margins.
      • Mark key passages. Write a descriptive word or two next to each paragraph for future reference. If unable write a question mark and go on.
      • Question marks in margin when confused and point out what confuses you (e.g. by circling och underlining words).

      7:14 Step 6. Write a short summary.

      10 minutes after finished reading. Do not postpone.

      In book or on sticky note.

  24. Aug 2019
    1. a favorite weapon for class participation

      I have never thought of questions as a weapon or a tactic to be weaponized. I know that it is a powerful tool and as such is capable of abuse. I think the point here is that we need to consider or own intent in asking a question AND that we need to consider the different kinds of questioning we might do. I have had students answer questions on twitter, on index cards, in Google forms, through pair and share and more.

  25. Jun 2019
    1. David Jauss. Alone With All That Could Happen: Rethinking Conventional Wisdom about the Craft of Fiction. Writer's Digest Books, Cincinnati, Ohio, 1st edition edition, July 2008.

      The chapter "Stacking Stones" describes the various techniques and effects that can be created by authors of short story collections. Put simply, Jauss argues that we ought to read story collections as collections, in the order in which they appear. The argument is based on a series of "unifying principles" and "structural techniques" that stitch collections together. The most important two, in my view, are the "liaison" — or, a motif that speaks across stories — and "mimesis" — the interaction in a collection between form and meaning. Jauss holds The Things They Carried as an exemplar of mimesis.

      This text is useful in thinking about collections, but it is also useful for teaching new literary readers about how to approach collections. The instinct is to fragment the collection into digestible chunks — i.e. the stories as individual texts — rather than reckon with them en masse.

  26. Mar 2019
    1. classroom assessment techniques These are quick ways to complete formative assessment during a class session. The results can help the instructor determine what he or she should address. it can unearth learner misconceptions. These were designed for college classrooms but can be used in other adult learning contexts. rating 4/5

  27. Feb 2019
    1. it was necessary to socif:Wc.i,ss ety, and to the state of human nature in general,1MM--4fct.., that the language of the animal passions of man(J•� at least, should be fixed, self-evident, and univer­cl,,yli'.A.� sally intelligible; and it has accordingly been im-� pressed, by the unerring hand of nature, on the human frame.

      Sheridan claims that such "animal passions" are a universal thing (says emotions are "the same in all nations" in the next column), but this strikes me more as a cultural technique. (What also of those who don't experience emotions in the same way? Sociopaths or otherwise?)

    1. no material difference

      Or nothing but material difference (paper) between them ;)

      Like kmurphy1, I was thinking Ong would likely disagree on this matter, but Astell does make room for their differences as "talents which do not always meet." For all the functional differences (oral vs pen and paper, intangible vs tangible), does Astell see them both as means of communication and therefore only different in those functions?

    1. different countries and re-mote ages, wherein the speakers and writers had very different notions, tempers, customs, orna-ments, and figures of speech, &c., every one of which influenced the signification of their words

      Brings to mind Rickert's rhetorics and Siegert's cultural techniques

  28. Nov 2018
    1. ಅಷ್ಟದಳಕಮಲವ ಮೆಟ್ಟಿ ಚರಿಸುವಹಂಸನ ಭೇದವ ಹೇಳಿಹೆನು:ಪೂರ್ವದಳಕೇರಲು ಗುಣಿಯಾಗಿಹನು.ಅಗ್ನಿದಳಕೇರಲು ಕ್ಷುಧೆಯಾಗಿಹನು.ದಕ್ಷಿಣದಳಕೇರಲು ಕ್ರೋದ್ಥಿಯಾಗಿಹನು.ನೈಋತ್ಯದಳಕೇರಲು ಅಸತ್ಯನಾಗಿಹನು.ವರುಣದಳಕೇರಲು ನಿದ್ರೆಗೆಯ್ವುತಿಹನು.ವಾಯುದಳಕೇರಲು ಸಂಚಲನಾಗಿಹನು.ಉತ್ತರದಳಕೇರಲು ಧರ್ಮಿಯಾಗಿಹನು.ಈಶಾನ್ಯದಳಕೇರಲು ಕಾಮಾತುರನಾಗಿಹನು.ಈ ಅಷ್ಟದಳಮಂಟಪದ ಮೇಲೆ ಹರಿದಾಡುವ ಹಂಸನಕುಳನ ತೊಲಗಿಸುವ ಕ್ರಮವೆಂತುಟಯ್ಯಾಯೆಂದೊಡೆ:ಅಷ್ಟದಳಮಂಟಪದ ಅಷ್ಟಕೋಣೆಗಳೊಳಗೆಅಷ್ಟ ಲಿಂಗಕಳೆಯ ಪ್ರತಿಷ್ಠಿಸಿಹಂಸನ ನಟ್ಟ ನಡುಮಧ್ಯದಲ್ಲಿ ತಂದು ನಿಲಿಸಲುಮುಕ್ತಿಮೋಕ್ಷವನೆಯ್ದಿ ಪರವಶನಾಗಿಪ್ಪನಯ್ಯಾ,ಮಹಾಲಿಂಗಗುರು ಶಿವಸಿದ್ಧೇಶ್ವರ ಪ್ರಭುವೇ.
    2. ಅಯ್ಯಾ, ಕಾಲತೊಳೆದುಕೊಂಡು ಬಂದರೆ ಕಣ್ಣಮುಂದೆ ನಿಂದೆ.ಕೈಯ ತೊಳೆದುಕೊಂಡು ಬಂದರೆ ಮನದ ಮುಂದೆ ನಿಂದೆ.ತಲೆಯ ತೊಳೆದುಕೊಂಡು ಬಂದರೆ ಭಾವದ ಮುಂದೆ ನಿಂದೆ.ಸಂದು ಸಂಶಯ ಕುಂದು ಕಲೆಯ ಕಳೆದುಳಿದು ಬಂದರೆಸರ್ವಾಂಗಸನ್ನಿಹಿತನಾಗಿ ನಿಂದೆ.ಬಂದ ಬರವು ಚಂದವಾಗಿ ನಿಂದರೆ ಅಂದಂದಿಗೆ ಅವಧರಿಸುಮುಂದುವರಿವೆನು ಮುದದಿಂದೆ ಗುರುನಿರಂಜನ ಚನ್ನಬಸವಲಿಂಗಾ.
    3. ಅಂಗೈಯೊಳಗಣ ಲಿಂಗಮ್ರ್ಕೂಯ ಕಂಗಳಲ್ಲಿಂಗಗೊಟ್ಟಡೆ,ತಿಂಗಳ ಸೂಡನಾದೆ ನೋಡಾ ಅಯ್ಯಾ.ಮಂಗಳಮೂರ್ತಿ ಗಂಗಾಜೂಟಾಂಗಮಯಕಪಿಲಸಿದ್ಧ ಮಲ್ಲಿಕಾರ್ಜುನಂಗ ಬೇರೆಂದರಿಯಲ್ಲ ನೋಡಾ,ನಿಜದ ನಿರ್ವಯಲಲ್ಲಯ್ಯನೆ.
    4. ಅಗ್ಘವಣಿ ಸುಯಿದಾನವಾದ ಶರಣಂಗೆ,ತನು ಸುಯಿದಾನವಾಗಬೇಕು.ತನು ಸುಯಿದಾನವಾದ ಶರಣಂಗೆಮನ ಸುಯಿದಾನವಾಗಬೇಕು.ಮನ ಸುಯಿದಾನವಾದ ಶರಣಂಗೆಪ್ರಾಣದ ಮೇಲೆ ಲಿಂಗ ಸಯವಾಗಬೇಕು.ಪ್ರಾಣದ ಮೇಲೆ ಲಿಂಗ ಸಯವಾಗದಿರ್ದಡೆಇದೆಲ್ಲ ವೃಥಾ ಎಂದಿತ್ತು ಕೂಡಲಚೆನ್ನಸಂಗಯ್ಯನ ವಚನ
  29. Jun 2016
    1. p. 73

      Makes an interesting suggestion about avoiding social comparison: give students individualised work, not by dividing them into groups, but by giving students the work they can do as fast as others in the room (i.e. hard worl to slow down the good students and easier work to speed up the slower ones.

  30. Nov 2015
    1. Infrastructures, for Collier, are amixture of political rationality, administrative techniques, and material systems, and his interest isnot in infrastructure per se but in what it tells us about practices of government. Soviet electricityprovision, through this lens, is analyzed for how it reveals a system of total planning in a commandeconomy rather than for what it tells us about the effects of electricity on users in Russia.

      It's never really about what is in front of us when it comes to politics.. there is always more to it.. His theory is a tool we could study to learn about a country/society's government by looking at the infrastructure they've created.

  31. Apr 2015