80 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. The timing was less than ideal. His previous works had all proved “dismal financial flops,” as he said in 1950. He had recently secured an appointment at Cornell University as an associate professor of Russian literature. For the first time in two decades, the couple found themselves in the neighborhood of financial security. If ever there had been a time when Mrs. Nabokov should have discouraged her husband from working on what seemed an unsellable manuscript, it was 1949.

      Nabokov began teaching at Cornell in 1948 and must have been relatively financially well-off enough to afford the roughly $95 ($1,248 in 2024 dollars) for a brand new Royal Quiet De Luxe typewriter.

      The typewriter is pictured at the top of the article in a photo from a 1958 photo shoot. Presumably he bought it contemporaneously, though may have gotten it used after its release in 1949. The model changed in mid-1950.

  2. Jun 2024
    1. https://site.xavier.edu/polt/typewriters/nabokov.jpeg via https://site.xavier.edu/polt/typewriters/typers.html

      This photo, similar to others in the Carl Mydans series for LIFE Magazine is surely from his September 1958 photo series, though I couldn't find an original from the LIFE archive.

      Nabokov, reading off of index cards in his zettelkasten, dictates to his wife Vera who is typing on what appears to be a 1949 or 1950 Henry Dreyfuss Royal Quiet De Luxe typewriter.

      Notice metal strip on the back of the typewriter with small rectangular blocks. This is the Royal's tabulator set up which distinguishes the Quiet De Luxe model from the Arrow model.

      The body styling of this typewriter changed in 1950 from Dreyfuss' original 1948 design. Because it's light gray it has to be from '49 or '50 as the '48 original was a black body with dark gray highlights and didn't have chrome across the front as this one does in an alternate angle.

    1. https://images.google.com/hosted/life/2bff56953d14c9d9.html

      Nabokov, reflected in a mirror off camera, dictating his writing from index cards to his wife Vera who is typing on what appears to be a 1949 or 1950 Henry Dreyfuss Royal Quiet De Luxe typewriter.

      Notice the chrome on the front of the machine which is sitting in its bottom case shell.

  3. May 2024
    1. What do literary stalwarts of the original typewriter era make of all this? “We old typists, it makes us feel young again to think there’s a new generation catching on,” said Gay Talese, 79. He still uses a typewriter, albeit electric, as does his friend, Robert A. Caro, 75, the Pulitzer-winning biographer of Robert Moses and President Lyndon B. Johnson. They discussed Mr. Caro’s Smith Corona while watching the Super Bowl.
    1. He eschewed computers, often writing by fountain pen in his beloved notebooks.“Keyboards have always intimidated me,” he told The Paris Review in 2003.“A pen is a much more primitive instrument,” he said. “You feel that the words are coming out of your body, and then you dig the words into the page. Writing has always had that tactile quality for me. It’s a physical experience.”He would then turn to his vintage Olympia typewriter to type his handwritten manuscripts. He immortalized the trusty machine in his 2002 book “The Story of My Typewriter,” with illustrations by the painter Sam Messer.

      digging the words into the page sounds adjacent to Seamus Heaney's "Digging" which analogizes writing to digging: https://hypothes.is/a/J-z8OgfQEe-0adtJyXyb3g

      There's something here which suggests pens, typewriters, keyboards, etc. as direct extended mind objects as tools for thought. A sense of rumination and expulsion simultaneously.

  4. Apr 2024
    1. Harry RansomCenter at the University of Texas, which houses Sexton’sletters and memorabilia. And her typewriter.

      Anne Sexton used a Royal Quiet De Luxe (beige)

    2. Solan, Matthew. “Tracking Down Typewriters: Those Trusty Tools of Days Gone By.” Poets & Writers Magazine, August 19, 2009. p 31-33.

    3. David McCullough, the noted histo-rian and Pulitzer Prize winner, haswritten everything he’s ever publishedsince 1965 on his sixty-nine-year-oldRoyal KMM standard desktop.
    4. TomWolfe still uses his 1966 Underwood.
    5. Pearl S. Buck and the 1930s RoyalStandard (with white keys) she used towrite The Good Earth, Jack Kerouac’sroad-weary Underwood Standard S,George Orwell’s Remington No. 2,Patricia Highsmith’s Olympia, Marga-ret Mitchell’s Remington No. 3 (whichher husband bought secondhand andshe relied on to type Gone With theWind and countless pieces of corre-spondence with fans).
    6. I have my work cut out for me withHemingway, since he used many type-writers: a gigantic Royal No. 10 desk-top with glass side panels from his earlyKey West days, an Underwood Noise-less that helped him fi nish For Whomthe Bell Tolls and fi le dispatches fromhotel rooms while he was a World WarII correspondent, and black matte Roy-als from the early 1940s—especiallythe Quiet DeLuxe and Arrow—he fa-vored while at Finca Vigía in Cuba.
    7. Deluxe Noiseless on display at MarjorieK innan Rawlings’s screened frontporch at Cross Creek, Florida; Flan-nery O’Connor’s 1930s Royal Stan-dard; Faulkner’s famed UnderwoodUniversal; Hemingway’s 1940 RoyalArrow; and the tiny, folding CoronaNo. 3 favored by both Ernie Pyle andIsak Dinesen.
  5. Nov 2023
    1. This overarching goal is stated in the U.S. Constitution, Article I section 8, clause 8, “The Congress shall have Power ... To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries.”

      Then, the article quote the U.S. Constitution, Article I section 8, clause 8, and then explains that, in the 18th century, this constitutional law gave the congress the power to grant exclusive rights to authors and inventors for their work, in order to boost creativity and innovation in the USA (U.S. Const., 1787). Later, the article claims that in the 1975, the U.S. Constitution, Article I section 8, clause 8 keep having the purpose of fostering innovation and creativity in the society, throughout economic incentive. Subsequently, the article supports this statement by quoting the law "Twentieth Century Music Corp. v. Aiken," which was created in 1975 with the purpose of boosting creativity and innovation in society throughout the economic incentive of assuring that creators receive a payment for their intellectual property that equates to the cost of producing it.

  6. Aug 2023
  7. Feb 2023
    1. Approaching this project, I felt committed to writing a story that could stand on its own; a story that achieved the same things I want ANY of my stories to achieve; a story to which the response might be not, “I see what you did there”, but: “I loved this!”

      "I see what you did there" as a genre of writing is interesting for its cleverness, but many authors will prefer readers to love their work instead of admiring their cleverness in one part.

  8. Nov 2022
    1. partnerships, networking, and revenue generation such as donations, memberships, pay what you want, and crowdfunding

      I have thought long about the same issue and beyond. The triple (wiki, Hypothesis, donations) could be a working way to search for OER, form a social group processing them, and optionally support the creators.

      I imagine that as follows: a person wants to learn about X. They can head to the wiki site about X and look into its Hypothesis annotations, where relevant OER with their preferred donation method can be linked. Also, study groups interested in the respective resource or topic can list virtual or live meetups there. The date of the meetups could be listed in a format that Hypothesis could search and display on a calendar.

      Wiki is integral as it categorizes knowledge, is comprehensive, and strives to address biases. Hypothesis stitches websites together for the benefit of the site owners and the collective wisdom that emerges from the discussions. Donations support the creators so they can dedicate their time to creating high-quality resources.

      Main inspirations:

      Deschooling Society - Learning Webs

      Building the Global Knowledge Graph

      Schoolhouse calendar

    1. 3/ Champion your competition’s work<br><br>With his reading list email, on podcasts, in his bookstore, Ryan promotes other books more than his own.<br><br>When asked, he’ll say:<br><br>“Authors think they’re competing with other authors. They’re not. They’re competing with people not reading.”

      — Billy Oppenheimer (@bpoppenheimer) August 24, 2022
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>
  9. Oct 2022
    1. “The one inhibition I felt using AnswerGarden [was] knowing that the experts were typically busy and workingon projects more important than my little application programs....

      So rather than distributing input over time, why not have a one-day deep dive with everyone (luncheon retreat)?

  10. Aug 2022
  11. Apr 2022
    1. Under the impact of the Carolingian Renaissance, flori-legia included classical authors as well, often arranged haphazardly in the order in which they were read.

      Florilegia began to include classical authors in addition to biblical passages and those of church fathers due to the influence of the Carolingian Renaissance.

  12. Jan 2022
    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>John Philpin</span> in // John Philpin (<time class='dt-published'>01/05/2022 22:55:00</time>)</cite></small>

    1. St. Bonaventura (1221-1274) found that there are basically four ways of 'making books' (modi faciendi librum):"A man might write the work of others, adding and changing nothing in which case he is simply called a 'scribe' (scriptor).""Another writes the work of others with additions which are not his own; and he is called a 'compiler (compilator).""Another writes both others’ work and his own, but with others’ work in principal place, adding his own for purposes of explanation; and he is called a 'commentator' (commentator) …""Another writes both his own work and others' but with his own work in principal place adding others' for purposes of confirmation; and such a man should be called an 'author' (auctor).’"
  13. Oct 2021
    1. List only the first author’s name followed by “et al.” in every citation, even the first, unless doing so would create ambiguity between different sources.

      APA 7 3 or more authors

  14. May 2021
  15. Apr 2021
  16. Mar 2021
    1. Use “01” for an unknown or inexact month or day, and “00” for any unknown or inexact time portion.

      "Use a midpoint for any unknown portion. For instance, if only the year is known, use a date in the middle of the year, and if the datetime is known down to a day, use noon for the time."

    1. Oliver Genschow, Mareike Westfal, Jan Crusius, Léon Bartosch, Kyra Isabel Feikes, Nina Pallasch,and Mirella Wozniak

      I assume that they are all from the same University.

    1. to group the volumes together

      Group them how / where? I'm reading this as "to present the volumes together in a IIIF viewer" or similar, with an implication later in the sentence of changing "while maintaining . . . " to something like "while allowing the user to browse each volume separately [as well]".

    1. http://iiif.io

      Should be https

    2. 1987-01-01T05:00:00Z

      Add to implentation notes above: "If the exact time is not known, then “00:00:00” should be used. Similarly, the month or day should be 01 if not known."

      And change here to 00:00:00

    3. lack of viewer support at this

      "lack of viewer support for date-aware navigation for single manifests"

    4. consumption by

      consumption only by

    5. entries

      Put bit about defaulting to zeroes here.

    6. periodical articles (journal, magazine, etc.)

      change to "resources"

  17. Nov 2020
  18. Oct 2020
    1. Could I also use Indie Web tools for a persona, or is that not in keeping with the community?

      The community is all about websites and identity, so having a website for a pen name is exactly the sort of thing you should definitely do! I'm sure there are a few who have done it, but I'm unaware of any documenting it yet. Starting a stub page on the wiki for pen name could be a good start if you do.

  19. Sep 2020
  20. Jul 2020
  21. Feb 2019
  22. Oct 2018
    1. yet the response of Kleaf to mean maximum mesophyll path length (Dm) fell into two distinct groups.

      Two groups

      1. highly signficant regression
      2. Conifers and cycads with schrieds.
    2. an intimate association between light-saturated net CO2 assimilation rate (Amax) and the hydraulic conductance (Kleaf) of whole leaves was found
  23. Aug 2018
  24. Apr 2017
  25. Nov 2016
    1. Ghost authors:This phrase is used in two ways. Itusually refers to professional writers (often paid bycommercial sponsors) whose role is not acknowledged.Although such writers rarely meet ICMJE criteria, sincethey are not involved in the design of studies, or thecollection or interpretation of data, it is important toacknowledge their contribution, since their involvementmay represent a potential conflict of interest. The termcan also be used to describe people who made asignificant contribution to a research project (and fulfilthe ICMJE criteria) but are not listed as authors. TheICMJE guidelines clearly condemn this practice and statethat ‘All persons designated as authors should qualify forauthorship, and all those who qualify should be listed.’
  26. Aug 2015
  27. Feb 2014
    1. I n B u r r o w - G i l e s , t h e C o u r t d i s t i l l e d t h e s a m e r e q u i r e m e n t f r o m t h e C o n s t i t u t i o n ' s u s e o f t h e w o r d " a u t h o r s . " T h e C o u r t d e f i n e d " a u t h o r , " i n a c o n s t i t u t i o n a l s e n s e , t o m e a n " h e t o w h o m a n y t h i n g o w e s i t s o r i g i n ; o r i g i n a t o r ; m a k e r . " 1 1 1 U . S . , a t 5 8 ( i n t e r n a l q u o t a t i o n m a r k s o m i t t e d ) . A s i n T h e T r a d e - M a r k C a s e s , t h e C o u r t e m p h a s i z e d t h e c r e a t i v e c o m p o n e n t o f o r i g i n a l i t y . I t d e s c r i b e d c o p y r i g h t a s b e i n g l i m i t e d t o " o r i g i n a l i n t e l l e c t u a l c o n c e p t i o n s o f t h e a u t h o r , " 1 1 1 U . S . , a t 5 8 , a n d s t r e s s e d t h e i m p o r t a n c e o f r e q u i r i n g a n a u t h o r w h o a c c u s e s a n o t h e r o f i n f r i n g e m e n t t o p r o v e " t h e e x i s t e n c e o f t h o s e f a c t s o f o r i g i n a l i t y , o f i n t e l l e c t u a l p r o d u c t i o n , o f t h o u g h t , a n d c o n c e p t i o n . " I d . , a t 5 9 - 6 0 .

      In Burrow-Giles the court defined authors, in a constitutional sense, to mean "he to whom anything owes its origin, originator, maker" and emphasized the creative component of originality.

    2. I n T h e T r a d e - M a r k C a s e s , t h e C o u r t a d d r e s s e d t h e c o n s t i t u t i o n a l s c o p e o f " w r i t i n g s . " F o r a p a r t i c u l a r w o r k t o b e c l a s s i f i e d " u n d e r t h e h e a d o f w r i t i n g s o f a u t h o r s , " t h e C o u r t d e t e r m i n e d , " o r i g i n a l i t y i s r e q u i r e d . " 1 0 0 U . S . , a t 9 4 . T h e C o u r t e x p l a i n e d t h a t o r i g i n a l i t y r e q u i r e s i n d e p e n d e n t c r e a t i o n p l u s a m o d i c u m o f c r e a t i v i t y : " [ W ] h i l e t h e w o r d w r i t i n g s m a y b e l i b e r a l l y c o n s t r u e d , a s i t h a s b e e n , t o i n c l u d e o r i g i n a l d e s i g n s f o r e n g r a v i n g , p r i n t s , & c . , i t i s o n l y s u c h a s a r e o r i g i n a l , a n d a r e f o u n d e d i n t h e c r e a t i v e p o w e r s o f t h e m i n d . T h e w r i t i n g s w h i c h a r e t o b e p r o t e c t e d a r e t h e f r u i t s o f i n t e l l e c t u a l l a b o r , e m b o d i e d i n t h e f o r m o f b o o k s , p r i n t s , e n g r a v i n g s , a n d t h e l i k e . " I b i d . ( e m p h a s i s i n o r i g i n a l ) .

      In The Trade-Mark Cases the Court addressed the constitutional scope of writings saying for a particular work to be classified "under the head of writings of authors," the Court determined, "originality is required"; independent creation plus a modicum of creativity.

    3. O r i g i n a l i t y i s a c o n s t i t u t i o n a l r e q u i r e m e n t . T h e s o u r c e o f C o n g r e s s ' p o w e r t o e n a c t c o p y r i g h t l a w s i s A r t i c l e I , § 8 , c l . 8 , o f t h e C o n s t i t u t i o n , w h i c h a u t h o r i z e s C o n g r e s s t o " s e c u r [ e ] f o r l i m i t e d T i m e s t o A u t h o r s . . . t h e e x c l u s i v e R i g h t t o t h e i r r e s p e c t i v e W r i t i n g s . " I n t w o d e c i s i o n s f r o m t h e l a t e 1 9 t h c e n t u r y — T h e T r a d e - M a r k C a s e s , 1 0 0 U . S . 8 2 ( 1 8 7 9 ) ; a n d B u r r o w - G i l e s L i t h o g r a p h i c C o . v . S a r o n y , 1 1 1 U . S . 5 3 ( 1 8 8 4 ) — t h i s C o u r t d e f i n e d t h e c r u c i a l t e r m s " a u t h o r s " a n d " w r i t i n g s . " I n s o d o i n g , t h e C o u r t m a d e i t u n m i s t a k a b l y c l e a r t h a t t h e s e t e r m s p r e s u p p o s e a d e g r e e o f o r i g i n a l i t y .

      This Court defined the crucial terms authors and writings.