42 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Feb 2024
  3. Jan 2024
    1. what kind of character type might he fit?

      Krishna is the incarnation of Vishnu. He's supposed to be the embodiment of a godlike character and hold many powerful qualities. He has many different character types he portrays in this story and is extremely accomplished. He urges the reader in a way to think about reincarnation which is obviously a big part of his character. "The place of the infinite spirit" (line 851) Krishna fits a representation of love, duty, honor and self control. Learning what type of character type Krishna is this early on is important to keep in mind as the story is read. If the reader doesn't understand the true depth of his character the story may not be as powerful. He shows many attributes of a fully developed character that knows the true power of who they are. In HIndu culture, a character like Krishna is all powerful but also shows a variety of character traits that make him a very admirable character.

    1. once you dissolve that boundary you can't tell whose memories or who's anymore that's kind of the big thing about um that that kind of memory wiping the the wiping the identity on these 00:06:18 memories is a big part of multicellularity

      for - key insight - multicellularity - memory wiping

      • key insight
        • individuals have information in their memories about survival
        • when they merge and join, they pool their information and you can't tell whose memories came from whom initially
        • this memory wiping is a key aspect of multcellularity

      investigate - salience of memory wiping for multicellularity - This is a very important biological behavior. - Perform a literature review to understand examples of this

      question - biological memory wiping - can it be extrapolated to social superorganism?

  4. Dec 2023
  5. Nov 2023
    1. in our modern way of thinking the dominant metaphors 01:10:43 are mechanical and in mechanical system is literally the case if you can make the system more efficient you get rid of waste so if you have parts that duplicate each other they're not needed you can get rid of one of them and 01:10:57 that's true for mechanical systems so that waste and mechanical systems can is something you can get rid of and decrease efficiency but in living human 01:11:08 and even biological systems duplication is not waste its resilience
      • for: key insight - modernity - inefficiency - biological system - resilience

      • key insight

        • in our modern way of thinking the dominant metaphors are mechanical
        • and in mechanical system is literally the case if you can make the system more efficient you get rid of waste
        • so if you have parts that duplicate each other they're not needed you can get rid of one of them
        • and that's true for mechanical systems so that waste and mechanical systems is something you can get rid of and decrease efficiency
        • but in living human and even biological systems duplication is not waste it's resilience
      • comment

        • aspectualization and situatedness
  6. Sep 2023
  7. Aug 2023
    1. sense of self is a construct a psychological and social construct it's something it's not something that 00:06:42 infants are born with it's actually something that develops as we grow up our caregivers look into our eyes give us a name that we learned to identify with and also basically we learn to see 00:06:59 ourselves as they see us we inte
      • for: self, constructing reality, constructed self, constructed reality, constructing the sense of self, self and other, nonduality, duality, insecurable, comment, question

      • paraphrase

        • sense of self is a construct
        • a psychological and social construct
        • it's not something that infants are born with
          • it's actually something that develops as we grow up
        • our caregivers look into our eyes
          • give us a name that we learned to identify with and
          • also basically we learn to see ourselves as they see us
            • we internalize that which is why we are so preoccupied with what other people think about
          • we learned to use language in certain ways
            • mine
            • you
            • yours
            • his
            • hers and so forth
          • that's all very essential to it
        • so we could say that the sense of self is being a construct
        • it's composed of mostly habitual ways of
          • thinking
          • feeling
          • acting
          • reacting
          • remembering
          • planning and
          • tending
        • it's the way that these mostly habitual processes work together re-enforce each other
        • but does that give us insight into what the fundamental problem is?
      • I think it does and here's what it is as I understand it
        • because the sense of self is a construct
          • because it doesn't refer it
          • doesn't depend on it
          • doesn't point back to a real self that has any self-reality or or self-identity
      • this sense of self by virtue of its lack of essence is inherently uncomfortable

        • we can say it's basically inherently insecure
        • in fact it's not only insecure but it's insecurable
      • comment

      • question
        • I agree with David's analysis but also have a question for him:
          • what about the biological, evolutionary definition of the self of a living organism. Is there a contradiction here?
          • reference
            • Major Evolutionary Transitions occur when a group of individuated living organisms achieve greater fitness by mutualism and begin to reproduce together as a new unit
              • How do we harmonize the claim of a psychologically constructed self with this evolutionary formation of new biological SELF units through MET?
  8. Jul 2023
      • Title
        • Life is not easily bounded
      • Subtitle
        • Working out where one hare ends and another begins is easy; a siphonophore, not so much. What is an individual in nature?
      • Author

        • Derk J. Skillings
      • comment

        • this article delves into the subject of defining what an individual is
          • what makes a biological organism the same or different from another biological organism?
          • This question is not so easy to answer if we are looking for a general definition that can apply to ALL species
  9. Apr 2023
  10. Jan 2023
    1. while I was listening to all of you and to our wonderful scientists 00:57:28 I thought of something that the distinguished physicist Freeman Dyson wrote shortly before he died he said he believed that 00:57:40 the speed of cultural Evolution the speed of cultural evolution is now faster than the speed of biological evolution so 00:57:53 what does that mean to me it's something very simple it means that we now hold our destiny in our hands and that's what you're all talking about

      !- quotable : Freeman Dyson - the speed of cultural evolution is now faster than the speed of biological evolution - references on the speed of cultural evolution: https://jonudell.info/h/facet/?user=stopresetgo&max=50&any=Cultural+evolution - Freeman Dyson essay on biological and cultural evolution: https://hyp.is/go?url=https%3A%2F%2Fviahtml.hypothes.is%2Fconversation%2Ffreeman_dyson-biological-and-cultural-evolution&group=world

    1. Our double task is now to preserve and foster both biological evolution as Nature designed it and cultural evolution as we invented it, trying to achieve the benefits of both, and exercising a wise restraint to limit the damage when they come into conflict. With biological evolution, we should continue playing the risky game that nature taught us to play. With cultural evolution, we should use our unique gifts of language and art and science to understand each other, and finally achieve a human society that is manageable if not always peaceful, with wildlife that is endlessly creative if not always permanent.

      !- Dual task: wrt biological and cultural evolution

    2. In the near future, we will be in possession of genetic engineering technology which allows us to move genes precisely and massively from one species to another. Careless or commercially driven use of this technology could make the concept of species meaningless, mixing up populations and mating systems so that much of the individuality of species would be lost. Cultural evolution gave us the power to do this. To preserve our wildlife as nature evolved it, the machinery of biological evolution must be protected from the homogenizing effects of cultural evolution.

      !- Progress trap : genetic engineering - careless use of genetic engineering will interfere with biological evolution

    3. Biological and Cultural Evolution Six Characters in Search of an Author

      !- Title : Biological and Cultural Evolution Six Characters in Search of an Author !- Author : Freeman Dyson !- Date : 2019

  11. Nov 2022
    1. Continuous remote monitoring of COPD patients—justificationand explanation of the requirements and a surveyof the available technologies

      Continuous remote monitoring of COPD patients—justification and explanation of the requirements and a survey of the available technologies

    Tags

    Annotators

  12. Aug 2022
  13. Jul 2022
    1. there's a lot of discussion about complex systems you know we've been discussing complex systems and i just want to make a couple of points here because uh 01:31:28 commonly some it is not uncommon that someone will say a complex system well that just means that it's liable to fall apart at any moment you know it's just too complex it's going to crash uh but and that that obviously can 01:31:41 happen you know systems can collapse quite quite true but obviously life would not be doing very well if the if if the evolution builds complexity 01:31:53 in species and you know in organisms and ecosystems if life would be have a rough go of it if it was so fragile that uh complexity became a 01:32:07 burden and and uh you know come and then you know you reach a certain level of complexity and then you fall apart that's not really i don't think i mean that can happen but that's but but complex useful complexity 01:32:19 doesn't make you fall apart it actually just does the opposite it serves what we've been talking about all along and that's problem solving so we are anticipatory organisms we are problem 01:32:31 solving organisms it's our nature most of what the human brain does is to solve problems of one kind or another social problems physical problems whatever and maneuver in the world you 01:32:43 know in a useful way and complexity is what allows that there's a number of studies that i cite here that show that as an organism even as a robot you know 01:32:56 faces uh more difficult pressures from its environment it complexifies and complexifies by complexity then it's it's it implies 01:33:08 a greater number of parts coordinating or cooperating in some way uh to you know solve this new challenge and obviously as a human we're very complex we have 01:33:22 we have complex needs we have we can think not just what's going to happen in the next millisecond but what's going to happen we can think about what's going to happen in 100 years i mean part of this project is to think about what might be 01:33:36 happening over the next hundred years or even a thousand years so as an organism complexifies it become it at least potentially becomes a better adapted to solving more complex 01:33:49 problems so you could and from that sense you could almost ex equate complexity with problem-solving capacity you know at least in a uh you know in a 01:34:01 general sense and then i talked about well that just reminds me of in the free energy calculations that we um have gone over in various papers it's like accuracy is the modeling imperative and 01:34:14 then complexity is tolerated to the extent it facilitates accurate modeling so if you get the one parameter model and you got 99 and it's adequate and it's good then you're good to go and you're gonna go for simplicity 01:34:26 but then what you're saying is actually the um appearance and the hallmark of complexity in the world it means that that organism has the need to solve problems at a given 01:34:40 level of counterfactual depth or inference skill or temporal depth temporal thickness

      While complex systems these days has connotations of being more fragile or more challenging to fix, In evolutionary biology, complexity has evolved in organisms to make them more adaptable, more fit. Human beings are complex organisms. Most of our brain is dedicated to solving one type of problem or another, we anticipate the world and problem solving involves choosing the best option based on anticipation and our models.

  14. Jun 2022
    1. evolution works on a much longer time scale right than than 00:35:09 any given life and so we need to we rely pretty heavily on helpful social norms right these cultural norms that actually teach us the right way to engage with each other and that can transcend any 00:35:22 one generation um and you know we worked really hard um in the west you know not just i mean this has happened everywhere but it you know we're where we're from um to acquire norms from from that we would 00:35:35 have called you know liberal democracy right that tolerance and respect and and these things and individual rights and you know it you see those things start to erode now and you start to see some of that base 00:35:48 nature taking back over the tribalism and the seeing the other as the enemy um the outgrouping of people and it we know from history it doesn't end well there right like the erosion of these norms 00:36:02 not only will continue to exacerbate collective illusions they i i think they're the biggest threat to free society that we face in a very long time yeah yeah you made a very convincing case for that

      Biological evolution works on relatively long time scales. Cultural evolution works on very short time scales. If we do not seriously listen to the lessons of history that teach valuable social norms, then we don't learn from history and history repeats.

  15. Feb 2022
    1. you can't see the beetle in my box nor I the one in yours ludwig wittgenstein use the beetle in the Box analogy to suggest that the meaning of sensation words such as pain isn't given 00:01:10 by referring to some private inner introspected something a sensation to which you alone have access in his view there can't be more to the public meaning of our language than we are capable of teaching each other and the 00:01:23 private something the beetle can't have a role in that teaching because we can't get at

      The duality of self and other is the peculiar symmetrical asymmetry of being human, and possibly of being life itself.

      Similarity and differences in the meaning of words between individuals is unavoidable because we all seem to share this quality of consciousness, as well as the quality of experiencing others as objects of our consciousness.

      Nature instills the quality of "unique conscious experience" to each of us. Biological replication is the basis for the repetition of this pattern in all members of our species.

      Why was I drawn to the content of this youtube, which came from this article interviewing Teodora Petkova: https://medium.com/content-conversations/a-semantic-text-strategy-conversation-teodora-petkova-fa6d8ad7c72f Through this youtube and through the interview with Teodora Petkova, I became aware of Ludwig Wittgenstein's beetle-in-a-box analogy for private thoughts.A meme is reproduced and shared over and over, drawing people who resonate with it.

      Hence, my own discovery of this idea demonstrates the mechanics of self and other consciosness. In any rendition of the present, my semantic state has been influenced by countless number of other writers, content developers or consciousnesses, echoing Husserl's Lebenswelt. Once we are bootstrapped into language through a long gestation period of child development, we simply grow our vocabulary of words, and continuously upgrade their individual meaning through the unique experiences of our unique lifeworlds.

      This symmetrical asymmetry is a distinct and unique property of the individual human, showing just how entangled the individual is with the collective, the self with the other.

      It is said that the most obvious is at the same time the most difficult to see. The metaphor "a fish does not know of the water that surrounds it" is apt. Our symmetrical asymmetry of experience is so universal that its salience and peculiarity is easily overlooked and not explicitly discussed except by the philosophically inclined. It is more often subconsciously felt than made into an explicit subject of discourse. It is recognized as obvious and coming with the territory of being human.

      Indeed, we might say that this common peculiarity of the private, subjective world is paradoxically one of the strangest and yet one of the most common at the same time. Its obviousness does not lessen its profound sense of magic.

      The fact that we live in these two kinds of worlds, the private inner and the public outer, and that these terms "private inner" and "public outer" are themselves abstractions, also explains how our participation in collective reality may often not live up to expectations.

      For example, in a time when the world needs to undergo a monumental whole system change, it is a challenge to mobilize sufficient number of people to drive the needed change. Part of the reason for this could be that the individual pole, the salience of the "private, inner" pole could prioritize it above even such collective action. The ideas and feelings in our own life as an individual, driven by our private inner lives may dominate our individual actions. Getting on with life often supersedes even threats to society.

  16. Jan 2022
  17. Nov 2021
    1. We are like someone who knows that a fever, a cough, and loss of smell are all symptoms of something, but has no idea about the virus that causes them.

      Metaphor to illustrate that we don't know the cause of depression.

    1. Each new layer of Life is the result of what scientists call a major evolutionary transition? What was the cause of these transitions the answer is? Cooperation a Major Transition starts when free living creatures team up to form a cooperative group in the early stages of cooperation Participants are free to come and go as they [please] [if] a group sticks together long enough however 00:04:51 Division of labor will often evolve different participants begin specializing in different tasks as time goes on Individuals may become so specialized that they can no longer survive on their own [if] the entire group becomes locked into cooperation Depending fully on one another to survive and reproduce a new super organism has been forged and they made your evolutionary transition is complete 00:05:16 From this point on the entire group will evolve together as one Models describing natural situations that might promote the evolution of major transitions have been put forth by scientists such as John Maynard Smith [fior] Sonck Mary stuart West and w d hamilton using these models Researchers have been able to Mimic natural scenarios in the lab Allowing us to directly witness the beginnings of major transitions [evolved]

      This is the key to Major Evolutionary Transition - a population of free living individual creatures discover that in teaming up, there is a greater resultant evolutionary fitness, mutualism symbiotic relationship emerges. It becomes so strong over time that the many become a self-replicating one.

      The biological self is always defined by a boundary between inner and outer, but in this act of mutualism, the many biological selves join to form a new higher order biological self.

      In this way, a multi-cellular species like ours is somewhat like one of those nested Russian dolls.

      Indeed, Amanda Robins hypothesizes

      https://hyp.is/NyrixELGEeyYWN_d76UNMg/docdrop.org/video/6J-J72GoqhY/

      that our species has undergone what she and Peter Nonacs calls Major System Transition (MST). The cultural artifact of inscribed language has made possible a superorganism / supraorganism that has spread across the globe.

  18. Oct 2021
  19. Jul 2020
  20. May 2020
  21. Apr 2020
  22. Mar 2020
    1. selected after transformation and used to inoculate liquid cultures

      Would the variability be the same if the colonies were picked from a streaked plate (from glycerol stock) instead of a transformation plate?

      I would expect the glycerol stock method to have more variability, but it would be good to test

  23. Oct 2019
    1. bioluminescence was observed during the incubation time between 90 and 150 min in the presence of a sole carbon source such as glucose, acetate, l-glutamate and BOD standard solution (GGA solution)

      So this is a limited BOD sensor for only the subset of organic compounds that E. coli can metabolize?

  24. Feb 2019
  25. Nov 2018
  26. Feb 2018
    1. Different sets of ESR1 polymorphisms were associated with cognitive decline from CDR 0 to 0.5 and CDR 0.5 to 1. ESR1 polymorphisms (rs3853248, rs22334693 [ESR1+397], rs9340799 [ESR1+351], rs9397456, rs1801132 [ESR1+975], rs2179922, rs932477, and rs9341016) were associated with the deterioration of episodic memory among subjects with baseline CDR 0, indicating these polymorphisms might be markers for episodic memory decline at an earlier stage
      p(HGNC:ESR1) hasVariant g(dbSNP:rs3853248)
      p(HGNC:ESR1) hasVariant g(dbSNP:rs22334693)
      p(HGNC:ESR1) hasVariant g(dbSNP:rs9340799)
      p(HGNC:ESR1) hasVariant g(dbSNP:rs9397456)
      p(HGNC:ESR1) hasVariant g(dbSNP:rs1801132)
      p(HGNC:ESR1) hasVariant g(dbSNP:rs2179922)
      p(HGNC:ESR1) hasVariant g(dbSNP:rs932477)
      p(HGNC:ESR1) hasVariant g(dbSNP:rs9341016)
      
      a(NIFT:"Clinical dementia rating") pos g(dbSNP:rs3853248)
      a(NIFT:"Clinical dementia rating") pos g(dbSNP:rs22334693)
      a(NIFT:"Clinical dementia rating") pos g(dbSNP:rs9340799)
      a(NIFT:"Clinical dementia rating") pos g(dbSNP:rs9397456)
      a(NIFT:"Clinical dementia rating") pos g(dbSNP:rs1801132)
      a(NIFT:"Clinical dementia rating") pos g(dbSNP:rs2179922)
      a(NIFT:"Clinical dementia rating") pos g(dbSNP:rs932477)
      a(NIFT:"Clinical dementia rating") pos g(dbSNP:rs9341016)
      
    1. Although we observed no association between rs3785883 or rs1868402 alone and change in CDR-sb (P > .10), there was a significant association between a combined genotype model and change in CDR-sb: carriers of the high-risk genotypes at both loci progressed >2.9 times faster than noncarriers (P = .015)
      g(dbSNP:rs1868402) cnc a(CTO:"Clinical_Dementia_Rating_Scale-sum_of_boxes")
      g(dbSNP:rs3785883) cnc a(CTO:"Clinical_Dementia_Rating_Scale-sum_of_boxes")
      composite(g(dbSNP:rs1868402),g(dbSNP:rs3785883)) pos a(CTO:"Clinical_Dementia_Rating_Scale-sum_of_boxes")
      
  27. Oct 2017
  28. Oct 2016
    1. blast

      BLAST finds regions of similarity between biological sequences. The program compares nucleotide or protein sequences to sequence databases and calculates the statistical significance.