47 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. In a nutshell, the King's Keys deck started as an experiment to see what card games would be like if you rebuilt playing cards from the ground up. Instead of using ranks and suits, each card has a number (from one to four), one of four items, and one of four colors. The result is what I call a 4x4x4 deck where 64 playing cards each have a unique combination of these three parts.
  2. Nov 2019
    1. The thing is that each UI decision depends on countless other UI decisions. A simple example is keybindings. On UNIX/Linux, it’s nearly impossible to pick reasonable default bindings for global desktop navigation because they all conflict with bindings that some app is using. On Windows, the desktop navigation bindings are hardcoded, and no app uses them, because apps know for sure which bindings to avoid.
  3. Oct 2019
    1. for the related Hegelian view that various forms of self-consciousness depend on intersubjective recognition

      intersubjective recognition and self-consciousness

  4. Jan 2019
    1. The machine-beings that emerge from these couplings thus demon-strate a different form of identity, o

      I had to come back to this when I had a memory flash-back. My oldest daughter had Polio before we adopted her from China. For years she had to wear a full leg brace (KAFO) to keep her from hyper-extending her weak and somewhat underdeveloped leg. At first people assumed the brace was temporary, but eventually she started calling it her "bionic leg." It worked. People laughed. It opened up a conversation about her leg rather than making it an object of negative conjecture.

      So, to diffuse ideas about disability, difference, and "other," she took on the identity of a cyborg, which acted rhetorically and psychologically on herself and others to diminish the "other" distinction. Calling herself a cyborg became a rhetoric of inclusion.

    1. Similarly, “momentum” is only meaningful as a materialarrangement involving movable parts.

      We are who/what we are in relation to others as a collective entity. I appreciate the"momentum" phrase -- suggests this constant driving force of moving forward.

  5. Dec 2018
  6. gutenberg.net.au gutenberg.net.au
    1. She

      Clara Brereton bares a striking resemblance to Jane Fairfax from Emma. This similarity is exhibited through their mutual reserve as well as their current situations. Both Clara and Jane are dependent on family members and may become governesses if they are not married. Additionally, they also have similar love stories in that both their love interests publicly show affection for the other prominent female character in the novel despite their own clandestine relationship.

    2. buried two husbands

      This is the first remarried woman in Austen's writing. While it was discussed in Persuasion, it was in much more generic terms, and mostly regarding men. This is an interesting dynamic.

    3. Sidney

      It seems that the very energetic and youthful characters in Jane Austen novels also end up being slightly insensitive. In Emma, for instance, Mr Woodhouse is upset at the way that Frank Churchill leaves the doors open despite the cold weather, showing his disregard for others

    4. seven or eight and twenty

      This is around the same age as some of Austen's male love interests. Mr. Darcy was 28. Many of the male targets of Austen's marriage plots were older than their female counterparts.

    5. incongruity

      Austen reiterates the idea of gossip that is mistaken and misconstrued, and it is both relatively innocuous and sometimes effective to the plot by introducing conflict. For example, in Pride and Prejudice with the gossip over Mr. Bingley and who would join his party, the story of Mr. Darcy's treatment of Mr. Wickham, and then the suggested engagement between Darcy and Lizzy Bennett.

    6. captivate

      The Miss Beauforts seem similar to Miss Crawford in Mansfield Park and Miss Isabella Thorpe in Northanger Abbey who were preoccupied with making an advantageous marriage by "capturing" or "captivating" a wealthy man.

    7. "move in a circle"

      This phrase is often used in Austen's works, referring to the particular society or selected families a person interacts with, and which usually indicates a level of social class. In Pride and Prejudice, Mrs. Gardener says she "moved in different circles" from the Darcys, and in Emma, Mrs. Elton hopes to install Miss Fairfax as a governess in a better circle than she might be able to procure on her own.

    8. fancy themselves equal

      Highlights the slight strife between "old" and "new" money. Lady Denham's words seem reminiscent of Sir Walter Elliot's disdain for those who made their fortune instead of inheriting it in Persuasion.

    9. most perfect representation

      Here, Charlotte displays similarities to Catherine of Northanger Abbey, who views the world through the lens of the novels she's read.

    10. Her seduction

      Reminiscent of Henry Crawford's desire to make Fanny Price fall in love with him in Mansfield Park.

    11. always more anxious

      Here, we are presented another form of a "fan" in Jane Austen's literature -- the crazy fanboy. Sir Edward is somewhat similar to Catherine in Northanger Abbey, but a whole lot creepier.

    12. impugn the sense

      Sir Edward's passionate praise of the Romantic novel is reminiscent of Marianne's dramatic speeches in Sense and Sensibility. This is slightly ironic considering that Edward's earlier rejection of the novel in favor of works that can be used to better oneself falls more under Sense than Sensibility.

    13. though it found me suffering under a more severe attack than usual of my old grievance, spasmodic bile, and hardly able to crawl from my bed to the sofa

      Diana's seems to be a bit exaggerated in her account which reminds me of Mary's letters of her "illness" to Anne in Persuasion and hypochondriac Mr. Woodhouse in Emma.

    14. Charlotte

      It is strange that Charlotte is accompanying the Parkers when her own parents only just met them. This plot point is similar to the moment that Catherine Morland stays with the Tilneys, even though her family doesn't know them at all.

    15. Women are the only correspondents to be depended on

      A common theme across Austen novels is that women tend to be more meticulous about writing letters than men. In Mansfield Park, for instance, Mary Crawford laments the fact that her brother Henry writes very short letters, if at all. Similarly, in Sense and Sensibility there is frequent correspondence between Marianne, Eleanor, and their mother. It is relevant that Austen herself frequently wrote letters to her sister Cassandra. Here is a sample of their correspondence: http://www.bl.uk/learning/timeline/item126754.html

    16. .
        This chapter establishes familiar character dynamics that might elucidate the trajectory of the personas Austen presents in this unfinished text. The chapter begins with the introduction of Miss Esther Denham and Sir Edward Denham, a scheming sibling pair reminiscent of Mansfield Park’s The Crawfords and Northanger Abbey’s The Thorpes. Austen explicitly establishes the bald aim of the two to obtain wealth and status from advantageous matrimony, a characteristic that similarly mirrors the Crawfords and Thorpes. Sir Edward, in particular, resembles Austen’s past villainous men; throughout the Austen canon, coxcomb-esque behaviors are the cardinal sins of bachelors. Indeed, Willoughby, Wickham, Henry Crawford, Mr. Elton, Thorpe, and Mr. Elliot all receive biting characterizations by Austen, and thus, given the fates of these men in their respective novels, we can predict that Sir Edward is not the male love interest of this story. 
       Sir Edward’s dynamic with, and apparent longing for the affection of, Clara Brereton, additionally reverberate into the Austen canon in a meaningful way. Other Austen works present relationships between gentried men and pseudo-adopted young women; notably, Emma features Jane Fairfax and Frank Churchill’s secret engagement and Mansfield Park depict Henry Crawford’s arguably predatory pursuit of Fanny Price. These relationship both demonstrate wealth and class incongruities as interpersonal complications. Further, these dynamics are also characterized by the ignorance of other characters to the details of the relationship. Therefore, we cannot know from this unfinished account of Charlotte’s observations if Clara Brereton is a Fanny Price or a Jane Fairfax; we cannot fully know if the behaviors and dispassion Charlotte Heywood witnesses are evidence of a painful resistance to unwanted advances or red herrings to disguise an intimacy. Since speculation is the nature of this activity, however, it is notable that in both Mansfield Park and Emma, outside perceptions of the aforementioned relationships were incorrect. Therefore, paradoxically, Charlotte’s perception of Clara’s distaste for Sir Edward might in fact evince a returned affection and eventual marriage between the two. 
      
    17. poor cousin living with her

      I predict that this character will be relevant to the marriage plot. The idea of a young person in this kind of circumstance reminds us of the Crawfords or Catherine Moreland. Single individuals living with relatives have, in other Austen novels, been very relevant in the marriage plots.

    18. Links to common words/themes throughout the annotations

  7. Nov 2018
    1. Create opportunities to apply knowledge immediately after a video.

      I really liked this idea and I have already applied it to my upcoming online lesson plan for an online course.

  8. Oct 2018
    1. Speech based on knowledge is teaching, but teaching isimpossible [with some audiences];

      Aristotle is more cyncial than I would have thought. Or is he just being realistic?

    2. His interest inpolitical theory clearly developed out of Plato’s work but again wasmore pragmatic, based on study of existing constitutions in their his-torical development and defining the checks and balances that mightcreate stability in a mixed constitution rather than seeking to imaginean ideal state.

      Interesting, was not aware of how Artistole obtained so much influence from other philosphers

  9. Sep 2018
    1. Page 28: Looking at this representation of the Vitruvius Man in relation to the text so far, I can begin to imagine that the arms of this man look to be chained to the corners of this bounding box. These parameters for a machine-like man are placing a restraint on the human body, and our ability to create better design for human bodies. Maybe it’s from all of the action movies I’ve been watching lately, but the construction lines that cross though this drawing can certainly be seen as chains as well.

  10. Mar 2018
    1. hypertension, heart disease, stomach ills,respiratory difficulties, and depressive episodes, often referred to as ner-vous breakdowns

      does this :internalization" process also contribute to the depressive episodes?

      In order to maintain their image of a strong black woman, black women mask those behaviors which may make them seem weak. aka "internalizing" them.

      this now makes more sinse as to why her initial breakdown is in her apartment in the first place. she only becomes other parts of herselves when she's alone.

    2. the content (metaphors, recurring images, narratives) and the format ofspeech (disavowals, changes in volume, and contradictions) to identifyhow individual speakers mark their proximity to and distance from cul-tural discourses.

      Can these distinctions be found in a close reading of Sarah's other selves? what is there proximity to and distance from cultural discoruses

      Must read "The listening Guide"

  11. Feb 2018
    1. songs

      All that I have given up to this let them serve as examples of the way in which the Connaught peasant puts his love-thoughts into song and verse, whether it be hope or despair, grief or joy, that affect him. (147)

      In these final lines of the book, the reader is offered Hyde’s selection of songs as a faithful and complete insight into vernacular Connacht song about the theme of love. Moreover, Hyde suggests that in reading this anthology one achieves a good degree of familiarity with an idealized, essentially native ‘Connaught peasant’.

      Although speakers in the songs are variously male and female, and the reasons for separation from absent lovers differ, the experience of love is fairly uniform throughout. It is a sore experience of unrealized desire. That scenario produces a pronouncedly virtuous image of the ‘Connaught peasant’ for a number of reasons.

      The reader encounters deep loyalty where admiration is unstinted by forbiddance of love because of emigration, lack of requital, or death. ‘Úna Bhán,’ for example, is preceded by a long passage explaining how deeply a bereaved lover missed the fair Úna after, until he himself passed away. Also, Hyde’s anthology is particularly rich in its examples of similes drawn from the natural world. See ‘my love is of the colour of the blackberries’ (5) in ‘If I Were to Go West’, ‘I would not think the voice of a thrush more sweet’ (27) in ‘Long I Am Going,’ and ‘My love is like the blossom of the sloe on the brown blackthorn’ (31) in ‘An Droighneán Donn’. In the vivid rendering of these images, the beauty of the desired lover is stressed, and the delicate sensibility of the speaker is inherently implied. The Connaught peasant is thoroughly valorized as a result.

      Accounting for consistencies among what anthologies include, and among what they exclude, can highlight their organizing agenda. One obvious example in the area of Irish Studies is the Field Day Anthology controversy, detailed in depth by Caitríona Crowe in The Dublin Review: https://thedublinreview.com/article/testimony-to-a-flowering/

      In the case of Hyde’s Love Songs, consistencies among excluded material strengthen our perception of how actively he sought to contrive an estimable image of the Connaught peasant. Though Hyde claims his selection is emblematic of the love-thought of that idealized personage, he does not provide any examples of la chanson de la malmariée. This variety of song is so widespread that Seán Ó Tuama, who was the principal authority on the theme of love in Irish folksong, included it as one of five major genres in his article ‘Love in Irish Folksong’ (in the book Repossessions: Selected Essays on the Irish Literary Heritage. Such songs are an expression of grief by a young woman unhappily married to an elderly man.

      If we are to view the songs anthologized by Hyde in a broader context of Connacht songs about love, an awareness of the chanson de la malmariéé is required. Faoi Rothaí na Gréine (1999) is a relatively recently published collection of Connacht songs. The collecting work was done in Galway between 1927 and 1932 by Máirtín Ó Cadhain, and latterly edited by Professor Ríonach Uí Ógáin. ‘An Droigheán Donn’, ‘Úna Bhán’, and ‘Mal Dubh an Ghleanna’ are common to Faoi Rothaí na Gréine and Love Songs of Connacht. The inclusion in the former of two famous songs of the malmariée genre, ‘Dar Mo Mhóide Ní Phósfainn Thú’ (I Swear I Wouldn’t Marry You), and ‘Amhrán an Tae’ (The Tea Song) demonstrate the strong presence of that genre in the ‘love-thought’ of vernacular Connacht song.

      This way of framing discussion of Love Songs of Connacht invites close interrogation of Hyde’s biases. The choice of material for inclusion and exclusion is ideologically cohesive, to the specific end of creating a valorous image of the idealized native peasant. In my M.A. thesis, I might further refine the line of argument pursued in this annotation, and use it as the basis on which to build a discussion of Hyde’s particular ideological motivations.

    2. of

      ‘as I got it twelve years ago from an old man, named Walter Sherlock, in the County Roscommon, a man who is since dead’ (31)

      It is worth noting that recordings of native Irish speakers from nineteen counties, made in 1930 and 1931, can be accessed at https://www.doegen.ie/counties Roscommon Irish, which Hyde had heard spoken by some final remaining speakers, can be heard here.

    1. Search alphabetically by song title

      This website provides important context for the exploration of a research question I am addressing in my M.A. thesis preparation.

      The portrayal of female personages in revivalist literature sets them in signally passive roles. This is most clearly at issue in the work of that period’s two foremost dramatists. In W.B. Yeats’ Cathleen Ni Houlihane, the female protagonist does not pursue her own course of action, but rather serves to inspire male heroism (P.J. Mathews discusses the play’s portrayal of female passivity at length in a piece, see http://www.rte.ie/centuryireland/index.php/articles/literature-and-1916). In The Only Jealously of Emer and The Countess Cathleen the value of women to society is achieved through acts of self-sacrifice for the benefit of significant male others (Christina Wilson has argued similar points in great detail: http://chrestomathy.cofc.edu/documents/vol5/wilson.pdf).

      In John Millington Synge’s Riders to the Sea, we encounter a blending of the taste for passive female characters with a revival fascination with the rural west. Old Maurya’s reticence and stern faith in God, following the drowning of her five sons, established her as the moral centre of her native Aran community. Her monologue in the play’s ending concentrates our attention on the community’s willingness to surrender to tragic fate, which is always threatened by the danger of the sea (the play is available to read online at this link: http://www.one-act-plays.com/dramas/riders_to_the_sea.html).

      What is interesting to me is that images of a massive female subject, favoured by Abbey playwrights who sought to stress the cultural specificity of Ireland, differ strongly with some prominent portrayals of the female subject in vernacular literature in Irish. In my annotation of this archive, I will provide examples of some genres of folk song – composed by females, and traditionally sung by female singers – that contradict ideas of a female subject as passive sufferer of fate. Annotations will include translations to English.

      After highlighting these features of oral literature in Irish, I will have laid down substantial grounding for a discussion of the ideological motivations of revivalist authors’ depiction of female subjects. It is interesting that certain tropes of a national identity, which these authors consciously sought to create, can be seen as divergent with realities of the social group which was most fundamental to that identity. This observation encourages consideration of European intellectual currents which might have influenced revivalist writers, romantic nationalism in particular.

  12. Jan 2018
  13. Sep 2017
    1. The first cycle (cycle I) is from 1st to 4th and the second cycle (cycle II), from 5th to 8th. The program includes eleven compulsory subjects: Language and communication Indigenous language (compulsory in schools with high density of indigenous students) Foreign languages ​​(compulsory in cycle II) Mathematics natural Sciences History Geography and Social Sciences Technology Art Physical education Orientation and religion, which the school must offer but is optional for students.

      how many classes they offer--- they offer language classes. do they study english? they also study orientation and religion, so how would religion fit in with sexual orientation?

  14. Jul 2017
    1. We do not help everyone equally—some people just seem to be more worthy of help than others. Our cognitions about people in need matter as do our emotions toward them.

      *Social experiment*: Our cognitive perception of others ha s an effect on whether we decide to help or not.

  15. Mar 2017
    1. risky

      I think this is key. The only alternative to argument is a risk--to risk one's self by making their narrative plain and facing the possibility that the other will reject one's narrative (and thereby reject one's personhood.

      The difference between the previous steps to avoid argument and this one is that this one advocates risk and seems to make no promise of resolution.

    1. We find that the timing of the “peak auction season”

      An example of using the hypothes.is platform to add personal &/or crowd-sourced annotations.

      'Groups' can also be formed on hypothes.is to share annotations.

    2. For example, the CV of Christie’s top sales days decreased, on average, by 71 percent between 1780 and 1835

      What is this academic talking about!? Can this possibly be true? Maybe check on http://wikipedia.org

  16. Aug 2016
    1. The other.

      I like to think of this word in one of its earliest meanings: either.

      The word and its world is locked in a yin yang. And why not? We are bipedial, binociular, binary brained, two-handed. The other and othering is embodied. Utterly. The world on the other hand (you see) is manifold, multilateral, messy and amusingly non-compliantly

  17. May 2016
  18. Oct 2015
    1. This predicament, which is entirely unavoidable, refigures ethics as something beyond individual choice. Yes, I make decisions about who or what might enter my home, who or what has access to my Twitter feed, but this only happens in the face of an ever-present exposedness to others. Prior to the large-scale availability of networked computational devices, Levinas described the relation that defines networked life. Levinas likens this predicament to that of the hostage, and he suggests that if “we” as humans share anything at all, it is this experience of being held hostage by another that resists representation, that arrives over and beyond our attempts to make sense of that other.

      The basis for a networked ethics...the fact that we are all always and already connected to others.

  19. Mar 2015
    1. an objective set for the Sprint that can be met through the implementation of Product Backlog. It provides guidance to the Development Team on why it is building the Increment. It is created during the Sprint Planning meeting. The Sprint Goal gives the Development Team some flexibility regarding the functionality implemented within the Sprint. The selected Product Backlog items deliver one coherent function, which can be the Sprint Goal. The Sprint Goal can be any other coherence that causes the Development Team to work together rather than on separate initiatives.

      an objective set for the Sprint that can be met through the implementation of Product Backlog. It provides guidance to the Development Team on why it is building the Increment. It is created during the Sprint Planning meeting. The Sprint Goal gives the Development Team some flexibility regarding the functionality implemented within the Sprint. The selected Product Backlog items deliver one coherent function, which can be the Sprint Goal. The Sprint Goal can be any other coherence that causes the Development Team to work together rather than on separate initiatives.