23 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Oct 2021
    1. Andreano, E., Paciello, I., Piccini, G., Manganaro, N., Pileri, P., Hyseni, I., Leonardi, M., Pantano, E., Abbiento, V., Benincasa, L., Giglioli, G., De Santi, C., Fabbiani, M., Rancan, I., Tumbarello, M., Montagnani, F., Sala, C., Montomoli, E., & Rappuoli, R. (2021). Hybrid immunity improves B cells and antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 variants. Nature, 1–7. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-021-04117-7

  3. Sep 2021
  4. Aug 2021
  5. Jul 2021
  6. Apr 2021
    1. The core problem here is that we really don’t know exactly how the brain learns information or skills. And for what we do know, we don’t have the ability to directly observe when it is happening in the brain. That would be painful and dangerous. So we have to rely on something external to the brain serving as evidence that learning happened.

      What we call assessment is really an attempt to create a proxy indicator for what we call learning.

      It seems weird to think of it that way; we don't really understand learning so we create tasks for students to complete in the hope those tasks somehow give us some insight into the thing that we don't really understand.

    2. quizzes, tests, exams, assignments – none of those can measure learning or skill mastery. Not directly at least.
    3. exams or tests themselves are not essential
    4. This article is ostensibly a response to the use of proctoring software in higher education.

      But in order to do that properly the author has also delved into learning and assessment.

      It's a well-written piece that questions some of our taken-for-granted assumptions around assessment.

    1. This post articulates a lot of what I've been thinking about for the past 18 months or so, but it adds the additional concept of community integration.

      Interestingly, this aligns with the early, tentative ideas around what the future of In Beta might look like as a learning community, rather than a repository of content.

  7. Jul 2020
  8. Nov 2019
    1. Cliquea la imagen abajo para sumarte al manifiesto

      Me parece que el formulario debería ser sencillo y estar colocado en una sola página, en lugar de múltiples preguntas disgregadas a lo largo de una encuesta.

      Me parece que el formulario actual está extremadamente dirigido a bibliotecarios, por ejemplo preguntando de qué tipo de bibliotecas se suscriben al manifiesto, con lo cual sesga fuertemente la posibilidad de instituciones de la sociedad civil e individuos que se vinculan a la misma.

      Dado que se recolectan datos, como el usuario de Twitter, el formulario Manifiesto debería indicar una breve política de tratamiento de datos, algo como que los datos no serán ofrecidos a terceros sin permiso explícito y serán recolectados únicamente a fin de:

      • mantenerte informado sobre el manifiesto,
      • hacer el apoyo al mismo visible.
      • contactarte para acciones relacionadas con los propósitos del manifiesto.
  9. Oct 2018
    1. SWS was generally not affected. It is concluded that beta 1 neurotransmission is directly involved in the regulation of PS.

      Full text summary: Beta 1 but not beta 2 is involved in REM sleep generation. High dose propranolol (which is not selective) practically obliterated REM sleep. Selective beta 1 agonism restored REM, while selective beta 2 agonism did not.

  10. Aug 2018
    1. In these two systems, the alpha 1 adrenergic receptor reappearance followed a monoexponential kinetic allowing to determine the half-life of the receptor (23h in vitro, 33h in vivo) as well as the rate of receptor synthesis and degradation.

      Thus, the effective pharmacological half life of phenoxybenzamine is roughly 1 day.

    1. Although atenolol had no effect on subjective measures of sleep this hydrophilic drug also reduced REM frequency, suggesting that either it has some central effect, or that REM reduction is due to a peripheral 'shielding' effect.

      Alternatively, it could have been nocturnal hypotension that was causing the sleep disruption.

    2. Analysis of the subjective questionnaires showed that recollection of dreaming and awakening in the night was increased by the three lipophilic drugs, propranolol, metoprolol, and pindolol. These results confirm reports in the literature but are contrary to those expected from considering the effects of noradrenaline on sleep. Analysis of physiological records confirmed subjects' reports that waking was increased by the lipophilic drugs. Dreaming (rapid eye movement sleep, REM) was reduced, as predicted from knowledge of the effect of noradrenaline on sleep. Increased awakening leads to an increase in remembered dreaming which explains the otherwise paradoxical results.

      Surprisingly, beta-blockers, unlike alpha-blockers, appear to impair sleep.

    3. These results confirm reports in the literature but are contrary to those expected from considering the effects of noradrenaline on sleep. Analysis of physiological records confirmed subjects' reports that waking was increased by the lipophilic drugs. Dreaming (rapid eye movement sleep, REM) was reduced, as predicted from knowledge of the effect of noradrenaline on sleep. Increased awakening leads to an increase in remembered dreaming which explains the otherwise paradoxical results.

      Surprisingly, beta-blockers, unlike alpha-blockers, appear detrimental to sleep. I would speculate that this could be the result of a shift in autonomic tone, similar to how caffeine tends to lower heart rate.

    1. Furthermore, no significant relationship (correlation coefficient: r < 0.3) was observed between beta 1 receptor occupancies of the drugs and the number of dreams. On the other hand, good relationships (r > 0.95) were observed between central and peripheral beta 2 or central 5-HT receptor occupancies and the number of dreams. These findings suggest that beta 2 and/or 5-HT receptor occupancy is superior to beta 1 receptor occupancy as an index for the sleep disorders.

      This suggests that a beta 2 agonist may be appropriate for sleep.

      Note: they appear to be talking about the number of dreams recalled (due to awakenings) rather than the actual number of dreams.

  11. Oct 2017
    1. Beta blockers have long been associated with sleep disturbances such as difficulty falling asleep, staying asleep, and insomnia. They have been shown to reduce the production of melatonin via specific inhibition of beta-1 adrenergic receptors. Melatonin is a hormone secreted by the pineal gland in the brain, and helps in maintaining normal circadian rhythms.6,20-21 People with hypertension already have a lower melatonin production rate than those with normal blood pressure.22

      The question becomes, then, do beta blockers impair sleep when exogenous melatonin is administered concurrently?