4 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. This issue is already known to us since yesterday. Our engineers are now working diligently to fix this behavior. I'd recommend you contact our Customer Care team and let them know that you're one of the affected users of INV36818. That way, they will link your company to the case. You will then receive a notification via email for its updates. 
  2. Apr 2019
    1. life as the reigning queen of Rupaul's Drag Race

      Certainly, it would be interesting to discuss how normative male domination doesn't leave place for posthuman drags deemed by society as "otherness". Otherness would not be the right term to convince the multiple identities embodied by drags. I think you can challenge the relationality between multiple others in so may ways (inanimate objects, cyborgs...), because posthuman drags' life are diverse (multiple characters). There is even maybe some self-styling notion.

      Maybe, you can also introduce some limitations of the posthuman drags boundaries.

  3. Jan 2019
    1. CORRESPONDENCE

      Throughout this section, Foucault characterizes correspondence as a way to reveal the self: "a certain way of manifesting oneself to oneself and to others," to "show oneself," "a decipherment of the self by the self as an opening one gives the other onto oneself."

      This sort of 'opening' is to make oneself vulnerable, to be seen by others. (cf. Marback's "A Meditation on Vulnerability in Rhetoric")

      This is characteristic particularly of writing that is intended for others (correspondence), but in what ways are other forms of writing equally--if not more--revealing of the self?

      (That also makes me question whether any writing is truly for the self and not intended in some way for others. Even diaries/journals are written with the possible eventuality that someone other than the writer will read it.)

  4. Mar 2017
    1. have to start searching that person's history until we begin to understand what led him or her to speak just so. Sometimes we do less well: if the history isn't there for us, we don't learn it, but instead make it up to suit ourselves.

      This is an excellent view of the relationship with Others who do not fit the schema we hold. We can probably relate this back to embodiment and how a disagreement of ideas turns into a disagreement between (and because of) bodies, but I'm going to wait and see where Corder goes with this before wandering down that road . . .

      Later update: I like his very embodied, lengthy chain of descriptions (flushed, feverish, quaky, shakey" etc.) to the heart of competing narratives.