52 Matching Annotations
  1. Oct 2021
    1. What does it mean to have governments now calling for these huge tree-planting programs, without talking about Land Back, without foregrounding Indigenous land rights and Indigenous knowledge, and so thinking about what that would mean, what it would mean to look at an entirely new lens for conservation that is not about creating tree museums for carbon sequestration, but really, about returning land.
    1. When gold was discovered in the Yukon, 100,000 people desperately tried to make it to a small patch of land in one of the most remote environments on the continent. Few made it all the way. The Klondike Gold Rush was many things: a media conspiracy, a ponzi scheme, a land grab. But above all, it was a humanitarian disaster that stretched over much of the Pacific Northwest.

      “The truth is that all of the gold that was mined out of the Klondike was under Indigenous land. There was no treaty with any of the Indigenous peoples in the Yukon.”

      “That land was stolen by the Canadian state and that gold was whisked away by private interests. The Federal Government only signed land claims with Indigenous peoples in the Yukon in the 1990s, but by that point, almost all the gold had been mined out of the ground.”

      “The Klondike gold rush was a rolling disaster that captured tens of thousands of people. When the first European explorers came to the Americas, they came here looking for gold. In the 1890s, that lust for precious metals eventually led men to the farthest reaches of this continent.”

      “Today, instead of 100,000 people descending on a small patch of land, you have large corporations digging treasures out of the ground. But the legacies these mining operations leave behind are just like what happened in the Klondike: workers with broken bodies, environmental destruction, the dispossession of Indigenous land, sexual violence. The gold rushes never stopped. They just morphed into something different.”

      Canada is Fake

      “Canada is not an accident or a work in progress or a thought experiment. I mean that Canada is a scam — a pyramid scheme, a ruse, a heist. Canada is a front. And it’s a front for a massive network of resource extraction companies, oil barons, and mining magnates.”

    1. Stories about the dirty business of Canadian mining.

      Canadaland: Commons

      Introducing our new season… Mining

      Stories about the dirty business of Canadian mining.

      Mining is a dirty business, but it is what Canada does best. Three-quarters of the world’s mining companies are best right here in the Great White North.

      In our new season, Commons: Mining, we’ll be digging deep into the practices and the history of the extractive industry. From the gold rushes that shaped the country to the cover-ups and the outright frauds at home and abroad.

      Canada was built on extracting what lay under the land, no matter the damage it did or who it ended up hurting.

      The first episode of Commons: Mining comes out on October 13th.


      Canada is fake

      Canada is not an accident or a work in progress or a thought experiment. I mean that Canada is a scam — a pyramid scheme, a ruse, a heist. Canada is a front. And it’s a front for a massive network of resource extraction companies, oil barons, and mining magnates.


      Extraction Empire

      Globally, more than 75% of prospecting and mining companies on the planet are based in Canada. Seemingly impossible to conceive, the scale of these statistics naturally extends the logic of Canada’s historical legacy as state, nation, and now, as global resource empire.

      Canada’s Indian Reserve System served, officially, as a strategy of Indigenous apartheid (preceding South African apartheid) and unofficially, as a policy of Indigenous genocide (preceding the Nazi concentration camps of World War II).


      Theft on a grand scale

      It’s really been about theft on a grand scale. Look at how the United Kingdom became rich, or England and then Britain as it was, at the time. It was through bleeding India dry, we bled $45 trillion out of India. We taxed the subcontinent until there was virtually nothing left, then used a small amount of that tax money to buy its goods. So we were buying goods with their own money. And then we used the phenomenal profits — 100% profits — from that enterprise to finance the capture of other nations, and the colonization of those nations and the citizens, the railways and the other things we built in order to drain wealth out of them.

      — George Monbiot

  2. Sep 2021
    1. Khelsilem Is Young, Squamish and Reshaping the Political Landscape How the kid they called Old Man Rivers is helping to change the future of his people and the region.

      “The Squamish Nation fought for decades to get their land back. In 2003, 10.5 acres of the 80-acre government-designated reserve were returned to their original inhabitants.”

  3. Jun 2021
    1. "Dear Jenny: What am I working on? How is it going?

      I love that after the break, he brings it back around to something from the beginning to close things out nicely. Something done by the best writers and usually the best comedians).

      Create some context, then use that context to your advantage.

  4. Apr 2021
    1. My surprise that no one is insulted by this is quickly overtaken by surprise that Venmo is condoning alcohol consumption among kindergarteners, the only group in America who is routinely asked, with educational toys like Leapfrog, to match short words with pictures.

      I appreciate what Barron is getting at here but I think he's taking an extremely contrarian stance to get at his point. Obviously Venmo is not condoning childhood alcohol consumption - a better and more nuanced take (which he alludes to elsewhere in the article) is that the conditions of modern life have prolonged adolescence for millennials (and generation z) - the traditional signifiers of adulthood are gone and the aesthetics of contemporary corporate app and internet design have adjusted to reflect this shift.

  5. Mar 2021
    1. Alxemes jiy ñów la lekkool di ubbi.

      C'est jeudi prochain la rentrée des classes.

      alxemes -- (Arabic) Thursday.

      jiy -- (?).

      ñów v. -- to come, to arrive.

      la -- can mean a lot of different things depending on context.

      lekkool bi -- (French: l'école) school. 🏫

      di v. -- be; mark of the imperfective affirmative not inactual.

      ubbi v. -- open, to start, begin, inaugurate.

  6. Feb 2021
    1. note that TRB source code modifications are not proprietary

      In other words, you can build on this software in your proprietary software but can't change the Trailblazer source unless you're willing to contribute it back.

      loophole: I wonder if this will actually just push people to move their code -- which at the core is/would be a direction modification to the source code - out to a separate module. That's so easy to do with Ruby, so this restriction hardly seems like it would have any effect on encouraging contributions.

  7. Jan 2021
    1. Great, I can use vw to scale text so it doesn't look puny on a desktop! Perfect... Oh. Huh, now the text is too small to read when viewed on a phone. Okay, well I can just use "max(x,y)" to make sure it doesn't get shrunk beyond a minimum size. Perfect... Oh. Hmm. Looks like "max" isn't supported properly by Chrome. Okay, well guess I'll just use "px" again.
  8. Nov 2020
  9. Oct 2020
    1. Then at some moment I just stumbled upon limitations and inexpressiveness of templates and started to use JSX everywhere — and because JSX was not a typical thing for Vue I switched to React over time. I don’t want to make a step back.
  10. Sep 2020
    1. But if you’ve spent time building front ends with components, it’s hard to go back. Svelte lets us do that with a minimum of fuss or code bloat.
  11. Aug 2020
  12. Jul 2020
    1. And on the topic of this particular article you need to own bigger mistakes too. It doesn't matter if the Apache board genuinely believed in 2014 that this was a good idea, it should now be obvious to everyone that it wasn't. Board members allowing it to continue can't fall back to "Well we didn't know...", because they do now. Every day that they have the evidence in front of them that the project is failing and do nothing they're _culpable_ for that as members of the board.
  13. May 2020
  14. Dec 2019
    1. Both /proc and /sys are virtual filesystems which reflect the state of the system, and allow you to change several runtime parameters (and sometimes do more dangerous things, like directly writing to the memory or to a device). You should never backup or restore them.
    1. You might think that a one-line configuration file is not worth backing up. However, if it took you three hours to figure out how to set that configuration, it will probably take you three hours again in six months time.
  15. Nov 2019
    1. the main reason we built a new multiprocess architecture is that Chromium's multiprocess support was never contributed to the WebKit project. It has always lived in the separate Chromium tree, making it pretty hard to use for non-Chrome purposes.Before we wrote a single line of what would become WebKit2 we directly asked Google folks if they would be willing to contribute their multiprocess support back to WebKit, so that we could build on it. They said no.
    1. Risk assessment◕Risk management strategy○Supply chain risk management◑

      okay, answer to previous question above.

    2. Risk assessment

      Note the differences between risk assessment and risk management. The project would look towards risk assessment and then migrate its focus to risk management potentially, but what then? and how will this transition be smooth/original?

    3. none of them analyzed the threat of, and vulnerabilities to, a cyberattack spanning all three interconnections.

      golden.

    4. Problem definition and risk assessment

      nice nice

    5. Problem definition and risk assessment.Addresses the particular national problems, assesses the risks to critical assets and operations—including the threats to, and vulnerabilities of, critical operations—and discusses the quality of data available regarding the risk assessment.

      This is the crux of what I should be looking at I guess This is in regards to national strategies. Is this what I need to do?

    6. Further, federal agencies have performed three assessments of the potential impacts of cyberattacks on the industrial control systems supporting the grid.

      Risk assessment or assessment of impact?

    7. The electric grid is becoming more vulnerable to cyberattacks via (1) industrial control systems, (2) consumer Internet of Things (IoT)45devices connected to the grid’s distribution network, and (3) the global positioning system (GPS).

      1) ICS 2) IOT 3) GPS

      worthwhile to assess one or all? Followed up question later

  16. Jul 2019
    1. If you are an aspiring a developer or an entrepreneur interested to learn about Backend vs Frontend Programming Languages & Frameworks, you are in the right place. This blog will help you understand what are the basic differences between frontend and backend technologies.

      What's the difference between Frontend Vs Backend? The backend consists of a server, application, and database. The frontend is the look & feel of website or application.

  17. Jan 2019
  18. Nov 2018
    1. So where does the remaining $2 billion a year go? Into expansion? No, ten years of the savings will help pay for the $20 billion stock buyback announced last fall.
  19. May 2017
    1. ($20*3)-($20*3*.1) = $54

      10% of $2000(cost of camer) * 3days = Rental Price

      Rental Price - Commission = Rental Made This guy totally forgot taxes here.... :)

      54$ for 3 days 365 days a year about 50 % usage so roughly 180 days. $54 for 3 days $? for 180 days = $3240 about 740$ profit per year for a $2000 investment if he's 50% utilized over the year.

      Camera's Man this guy needed to crunch some more numbers. Camera's have compatibility issues....

  20. Mar 2017
  21. Jan 2017
    1. Debating Wired Executive Editor Kevin Kelly in the May 1994 issue of Harper’s, literary critic Sven Birkerts implored readers to “refuse” the lure of “the electronic hive.” The new media, he warned, pose a dire threat to the search for “wisdom” and “depth”—“the struggle for which has for millennia been central to the very idea of culture.”2

      Full article available as PDF here:

      http://kk.org/writings/the-electronic-hive-embrace-it.php

  22. Dec 2016
  23. Nov 2016
    1. He murdered the son of the hacienda owner to avenge the rape of his youngest sister.

      He Killed an upper class kid because he raped his youngest sister

    2. he spent his life fighting the wealthy Mexican landowners and attempting to liberate the impoverished peasants.

      His goal was to fight wealth land owners

  24. Sep 2016
    1. A mathematical function does not execute any code — it just knows the answer. A Haskell function has to calculate the answer.
    2. you can’t have a set of all sets
  25. Jun 2016
    1. Title: The Reluctant Memoirist | New Republic

      Keywords: south korea, north korea, korean origin, investigative journalism, gathering information, push back, adoptive home, returned home

      Summary: After six months, I returned home with 400 pages of notes and began writing.<br>Something caught my eye: Below the title—Without You, There Is No Us: My Time With the Sons of North Korea’s Elite—were the words, “A Memoir.”<br>I immediately emailed my editor.<br>I later learned that memoirs in general sell better than investigative journalism.<br>I tried to push back.<br>“You only wish,” my agent laughed.<br>As the only journalist to live undercover in North Korea, I had risked imprisonment to tell a story of international importance by the only means possible.<br>The content of my work was what really mattered, I told myself.<br>The evangelical organization wanted to protect its close ties to the North Korean regime and the country’s future leaders.<br>The code of ethics of the Society of Professional Journalists states that reporters should “avoid undercover or other surreptitious methods of gathering information unless traditional, open methods will not yield information vital to the public.” It is hard to imagine any subject more vital to the public, or more impervious to open methods, than the secretive, nuclear North Korea; its violations against humanity, the United Nations has declared, “reveal a State that does not have any parallel in the contemporary world.” My greatest concern had been for my students, and I had followed well-established journalistic practices to ensure that they would not be harmed.<br>They called me “deeply dishonest” for going undercover.<br>My inbox began to be bombarded with messages from strangers: “Shame on you for putting good people in harm’s way for your gain.” One morning, I woke up to a Twitter message that read, simply: “Go fuck yourself.”<br>The ethics of her choice cast doubt on her reliability (another de facto peril of memoir), and her fear of discovery appears to have colored her impressions and descriptions with paranoia and distrust.”<br>My book was being dismissed for the very element that typically wins acclaim for narrative accounts of investigative journalism.<br>The backlash extended well beyond the media.<br>Why did people with no real experience of North Korea feel such a passionate need to dismiss my firsthand reporting and defend one of the world’s most murderous dictatorships?<br>Orientalism reigns.<br>What struck me was not whether the review was positive, but the selection of the reviewer, a former TV columnist of Korean origin, whose only past book-length nonfiction was on South Korean popular culture.<br>As an Asian female, I find that people rarely assume I’m an investigative journalist; even after I tell them, they often forget.<br>Such gender discrimination can manifest either positively or negatively.<br>“If I had written a highly detailed book about being embedded with a troop,” she said, “the magnitude of the actual legwork would have been recognized.” Yet she also believes that great literary journalism combines the heart and the brain.<br>I would like to report that I took the reaction to my book in stride, that I weathered all the accusations and dismissals with patience, that I understood their causes and effects.<br>In immigrant ghettos, I learned that in my adoptive home, my skin was considered yellow, the color of the forsythia that had bloomed around my childhood home back in South Korea.<br>This is why I risked going into North Korea undercover: because I could not be consoled while the injustice of 25 million voiceless people trapped in a modern-day gulag remains part of our society.<br>Here I am telling my story to you, the reader, essentially to beg for acknowledgment: I am an investigative journalist, please take me seriously.<br>

  26. Dec 2015
    1. Teaching two or three sections per semester would leave ample time for prep and office hours. Add in materials and tech fees around $100 and we could offer these courses for $900 per student per course, excluding marketing costs and considering only the cost of product delivery. These courses would be academically equivalent (incredible professor, great materials, office hours2) to any “regular” university course, but delivered online at around 20% of the all-in cost of buying such a course bundled with food, lodging, athletic facilities, Jacuzzis, and rock walls at an elite university.
  27. May 2015
    1. Medium's SPA navigation seems to foil Hypothes.is. I got back to your original Medium post by hitting the back button from a couple levels deep in Medium responses. Notice there are no Hypothes.is comment indicators:

      screen shot of Medium article Missing Hypothes.is comment indicator

    1. Peoplelokbacktotheirtimeasdualisticthinkers,andto theirfaiththatiftheyjustputenoughefortintoproblem solvingsolutionswouldalwaysapear,asagoldeneraof certainty.Anintelectualapreciationoftheimportanceof contextuality and ambiguity comes to exist alongside an emotional craving for revealed truth.