1,459 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. The Bruniquel cave, in southwest France, is believed to be a Neanderthal dwelling 100,000 years before humans in Europe. Stalagmites in the cave may have been arranged as walls, and possibly as a fireplace. Charred bone found in the walls date to 175,000 years ago.

      This cave is apparently fairly deep. Cross reference this with deep cave fires and asphyxiation research.

      Is it possible that such a place was used as a memory palace? Being secluded away and the play of fire inside would certainly fit some of Lynne Kelly's criteria from Knowledge and Power in Prehistoric Societies. More evidence would be needed however.

  2. Oct 2021
    1. https://slate.com/culture/2011/08/cathy-n-davidson-s-now-you-see-it-do-the-young-really-rule-in-the-internet-era.html

      A very prescient article by Annie Murphy Paul from 2011. It doesn't review Davidson's book, so much as to take to task some of the underlying optimistic views of the magic of technology. If only we were able to better adapt and evolve to create the sort of changes in humanity to take advantage of the potential benefits that were assumed. Instead, much of the tech sector adapted instead to hijack our slowly evolving attention to benefit themselves.

      I wish we as a culture had had more of this sober sort of outlook about technology at the time.

      I'm now even more intrigued by Paul's new book: The Extended Mind: The Power of Thinking Outside the Brain, which is already in my reading queue.

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Annie Murphy Paul </span> in "@ChrisAldrich @amandalicastro @CathyNDavidson Chris, you may be interested in this review of "Now You See It" that I wrote . . . https://t.co/TnnbQ3NHWf" / Twitter (<time class='dt-published'>10/17/2021 10:25:52</time>)</cite></small>

    1. Visual and auditory brain areas share a representational structure that supports emotion perception https://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(21)01283-5

      This portends some interesting results with relation to mnemonics and particularly songlines and indigenous peoples' practices which integrate song, movement, and emotion.

      Preprint: https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/254961v4

      Across the world, people express emotion through music and dance. But why do music and dance go together? <br><br>We tested a deceptively simple hypothesis: Music and movement are represented the same way in the brain.

      — Beau Sievers (@beausievers) October 12, 2021
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Beau Sievers </span> in "New work published today in Current Biology Visual and auditory brain areas share a representational structure that supports emotion perception With @ThaliaWheatley @k_v_n_l @parkinsoncm @sergeyfogelson (thread after coffee!) https://t.co/AURqH9kNLb https://t.co/ro4o4oEwk5" / Twitter (<time class='dt-published'>10/12/2021 09:26:10</time>)</cite></small>

  3. Sep 2021
    1. I feel like that is a very broad generalization but I would agree that most people have read something about technology. I'm also not sure if I agree that learning devices enhance learning outcomes for kids. I know there have been studies done that say if you use pencil and paper to write your notes, you are more likely to remember information.

    1. https://tracydurnell.com/2021/09/26/getting-more-women-involved-in-the-indieweb/

      Some great questions here and it's a difficult problem.

      My personal solution is to do my best to provide personal invitations to people I think would enjoy participating and then trying to provide some space and support for them once they've arrived.

      I do remember a self-named DrupalChix group of women around 2008 who banded together and created their own space within the Drupal community. Their leadership from within certainly helped to dramatically move the needle within Southern California. (cross reference: https://groups.drupal.org/women-drupal)

    1. I love this outline/syllabus for creating a commonplace book (as a potential replacement for a term paper).

      I'd be curious to see those who are using Hypothes.is as a communal reading tool in coursework utilize this outline (or similar ones) in combination with their annotation practices.

      Curating one's annotations and placing them into a commonplace book or zettelkasten would be a fantastic rhetorical exercise to extend the value of one's notes and ideas.

    2. ☞(excerpts) Beal, Peter. Dictionary of English Manuscript Terminology: 1450 to 2000.Oxford, GB: OUP Oxford, 2007. ProQuest ebrary. Web. 19 December 2016.☞Lesser, Zachary and Peter Stallybrass. “The First Literary Hamlet and the Commonplacing of Professional Plays.” Shakespeare Quarterly, (2008), 371–420.☞Smyth, Adam. “Commonplace Book Culture: A List of Sixteen Traits.” Women and Writing, c.1340-c.1650: The Domestication of Print Culture. Manuscript Culture in the British Isles. Eds. Lawrence-Mathers, A. and Hardman, P. Rochester, U.S.: Boydell and Brewer, 90-110.☞Summers, David. “—the proverb is something musty: The Commonplace and Epistemic Crisis in Hamlet.”Hamlet Studies 20.1-2(1998): 9-34.

      sources to add to my reading list, if not already there

    1. playing house

      This is how I feel about most people's personal websites. Few people have homepages these days, but even for people who do, even fewer of those homes have anyone really living there. All their interesting stuff is going on on Twitter, GitHub, comments on message boards...

      Really weird when this manifests as a bunch of people having really strong opinions about static site tech stacks and justifications for frontend tech that in practice they never use, because the content from any one of their profiles on the mainstream social networks outstrips their "home" page 100x to 1.

    1. https://briansunter.com/blog/five-minute-journal/

      Lists of prompts for writing/journaling:

      For a potential template:

      • # Morning Questions
        • [[Morning Questions]] #daily
          • [[What Am I Grateful for?]]
          • [[What Would Make Today Great?]]
          • [[What Am I Worried About?]]
          • [[What Am I Thinking of?]]
      • # Evening Questions
        • [[Evening Questions]] #daily
          • [[How Am I feeling?]]
          • [[What's Something Good That Happened Today?]]
          • [[What Did I Do Well?]]
          • [[What Could I Have Done Better?]]
    1. Ebooks Are an Abomination: If you hate them, it’s not your fault. by Ian Bogost in The Atlantic https://www.theatlantic.com/books/archive/2021/09/why-are-ebooks-so-terrible/620068/

      Ian Bogost has a nice look at the UI affordances and areas for growth in the e-reading space.

    1. https://zettelkasten.de/posts/no-categories/

      There's lots of advice for categories, tags, and other taxonomies out there. This isn't as opinionated as some, but takes the approach to allow things to come organically so that one can grow, expand, and (possibly most importantly) change.

    1. Likewise, the notes and sketches of artists and thinkers over the centuries bear testament to “that wordless conversation between the mind and the hand,” as the psychologist Barbara Tversky puts it in “Mind in Motion: How Action Shapes Thought.”
    2. This is the theory of the extended mind, introduced more than two decades ago by the philosophers Andy Clark and David Chalmers. A 1998 article of theirs published in the journal Analysis began by posing a question that would seem to have an obvious answer: “Where does the mind stop and the rest of the world begin?” They went on to offer an unconventional response. The mind does not stop at the usual “boundaries of skin and skull,” they maintained. Rather, the mind extends into the world and augments the capacities of the biological brain with outside-the-brain resources.

      https://icds.uoregon.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/Clark-and-Chalmers-The-Extended-Mind.pdf

      Where does the mind stop and the rest of the world begin?

      There seems to be a parallel between this question and that between the gene and the body. Evolution is working at the level of the gene, but the body and the environment are part of the extended system as well. Link these to Richard Dawkins idea of the extended gene and ideas of group selection.

      Are there effects to be seen on the evolutionary scale of group selection ideas with respect to the same sorts of group dynamics like the minimal group paradigm? Can the sorts of unconscious bias that occur in groups be the result of individual genes? This seems a bit crazy, but potentially worth exploring if there are interlinked effects based on this analogy.

    1. Turn your Aeropress upside down (using the inverted method pictured below) so that the plunger is rested on your countertop and the brewing chamber is at the top.

      James didn't include a photo here, but oddly I've never thought of using my Aeropress upside down like this. I'll have to give a try this week.

    1. Code that is needed to create the output and the output itself is hard to read because of all the workarounds we have to use, especially around shadowed variables and control flow
    1. https://via.hypothes.is/https://finiteeyes.net/pedagogy/extending-the-mind/

      A well written review of Annie Murphy Paul's The Extended Mind. Matthew Cheney has distilled a lot out of the book from his notes with particular application to improving pedagogy.

      I definitely want to read this with relation to not only using it to improve teaching, but with respect to mnemotechniques and the methods oral and indigenous societies may have either had things right or wrong and what Western culture may have lost as a result. I'm also particularly interested in it for its applications to the use of commonplace books and zettelkasten as methods of extending the mind and tools for thought.

    1. https://nesslabs.com/eisenhower-matrix

      The Eisnehower matrix is a means of helping one to implement the Pareto principle.

      Seen this basic idea so many times before and have it generally implemented in the bullet journal portion of my digital commonplace book. I should spend more time gardening in there regularly though.

    1. https://jrdingwall.ca/blogwall/25-years-of-ed-tech-blogs/

      JR writes about some of his journey into blogging.

      I appreciate some of the last part about the 9x9x25 blogs. For JR it seems like some smaller prompts got him into more regular writing.

      He mentions Stephen Downes regular workflow as well. I think mine is fairly similar to Stephen's. To some extent, I write much more on my own website now than I ever had before. This is because I post a lot more frequently to my own site, in part because it's just so easy to do. I'll bookmark things or post about what I've recently read or watched. My short commentary on some of these is just that, short commentary. But occasionally I discover, depending on the subject, that those short notes and bookmark posts will spring into something bigger or larger. Sometimes it's a handful of small posts over a few days or weeks that ultimately inspires the longer thing. The key seems to be to write something.

      Perhaps a snowball analogy will work. I take a tiny snowball and give it a proverbial roll. Sometimes it sits there and other times it rolls down the hill and turns into a much larger snowball. Other times I get a group of them and build a full snowman.

      Of course lately a lot of my writing starts, like this did, as an annotation (using Hypothes.is) to something I was reading. It then posts to my website with some context and we're off to the races.

    1. Scott Sampson has argued that we should subjectify nature rather than objectifying it. People are a part of nature and integral to it. We are not separate from it and we are assuredly not above it.

      Can the injection of multi-disciplinary research and areas like big history help us to see the bigger picture? How have indigenous and oral cultures managed to do so much better than us at this? Is it the way we've done science in the past? Is it our political structures?

    1. https://fs.blog/2021/07/mathematicians-lament/

      What if we taught art and music the way we do mathematics? All theory and drudgery without any excitement or exploration?

      What textbooks out there take math from the perspective of exploration?

      • Inventional geometry does

      Certainly Gauss, Euler, and other "greats" explored mathematics this way? Why shouldn't we?

      This same problem of teaching math is also one we ignore when it comes to things like note taking, commonplacing, and even memory, but even there we don't even delve into the theory at all.

      How can we better reframe mathematics education?

      I can see creating an analogy that equates math with art and music. Perhaps something like Arthur Eddington's quote:

      Suppose that we were asked to arrange the following in two categories–

      distance, mass, electric force, entropy, beauty, melody.

      I think there are the strongest grounds for placing entropy alongside beauty and melody and not with the first three. —Sir Arthur Stanley Eddington, OM, FRS (1882-1944), a British astronomer, physicist, and mathematician in The Nature of the Physical World, 1927

    1. https://fs.blog/2021/08/remember-books/

      A solid overview of how to read. Not as long or as in-depth as Mortimer J. Adler, but hits all of the high points in an absorbable manner.

      Definitely worth re-reading...