247 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Sep 2021
    1. The classic SPA example is a to-do list. But, you know what? I don't like to-do lists. They make me think about all the things I have to do, many of which I don't want to do.So why don't we make a To-Don't List app? That way we can list all the things we're not going to do. Ever.
  3. Aug 2021
    1. When writing about programming, I prefer to use 'annotation' as the general term. Although .NET was first, the word 'attribute' is just too widely used for different things.
  4. Jul 2021
  5. Jun 2021
    1. I completely understand that master have two meanings: A man who has people working for him, especially servants or slaves; and An original recording, film, or document from which copies can be made.
    2. I think it's just a bad English/mis-translation problem. I'm guessing @pmmmwh assumed 'master' meant like 主 in 奴隸主 (slave owner/master). Actually a better translation would be 師 like 功夫大師 (Kung Fu master). The specimen copies are made from.
    3. The specimen copies are made from.
  6. May 2021
    1. Hey, I'm a PhD in [field] and do [whatever] professionally. Before calling you, I've narrowed down the problem to [something on their end], so that's what needs to be addressed. If I could speak to an engineer about [specific problem], that'd be great; but if we've gotta walk through the script, let's just knock it out quickly. If they end up requiring the script, then the best way to use your expertise is to run through it quickly. Keep the chit-chat to a minimum and just do the stuff efficiently. If they start describing how to perform some step, you might interrupt them with, "Got it, just a sec.", then let them know once you're ready for the next step.
    2. So what can you do to demonstrate your technical knowledge? Well, you are doing the right thing by using the correct technical terms. That will give an indication to the person handling the ticket. Explicitly explaining your role as the administrator or developer should also help.
    3. From experience I can say that professionals will be more forgiving if you go through things at a basic level than amateurs who have no idea what you're talking about, so people will probably err on the side of caution and not assume the customer has a high level of expertise.
    1. I want to avoid nginx overhead (especially if they have tons of alias and rewrites) for in-server communication. Basically, you can have sveltekit server, backend server and nginx server, in that case, communicate inside your internal network will be very expensive like: browser->nginx server(10.0.0.1)->sveltekit server(10.0.0.3)->nginx server(10.0.0.1)->backend server(10.0.0.2) instead just: browser->nginx server(10.0.0.1)->sveltekit server(10.0.0.3)->backend server(10.0.0.2)
    1. You may have noticed your emails looking a little cramped in Hotmail and Outlook.com recently. The culprit? Discontinuation of support for the margin property in these email clients. Rather than honoring your carefully spaced paragraphs and images, Hotmail and Outlook.com are now completely stripping margin from paragraph tags, leaving default values (0 for the top, right and left; 1.35em for the bottom, to be exact) in their place.
    1. Yeah, as many developers will tell you, designing/coding for email is an incredibly hit-or-miss proposition...this is simply one more thing that may work in some email clients. The only consistent behavior in HTML/CSS emails is that nothing is consistent. :-)
    1. I'm coding an email for a project and man! it's such a pain. Every other client has it's own implementation and supported rules. Some don't allow even simple properties like background-image while some support most advanced rules like media queries
    2. Why are there so many programming languages and frameworks? Everyone has their own opinion on how something should be done. Some of these systems, like AOL, Yahoo, etc... have been around for a decade, and probably not updated much.
    3. That's something that has been bugging me too. I mean, it's fine if not everything is supported, but if everyone could agree on what is or should be supported then that would make a huge difference. But until then, it's going to be a struggle.
    4. I've worked with people at companies where this was their only responsibility. Setting up emails for clients, making sure they pass a battery of tests and look great in all browsers and clients. It's an incredible PITA and it's not a set it and forget it thing. Clients can change month to month; spam filters change, etc...
  7. Apr 2021
    1. That's true although it depends on intentions. My approach is to always create a unique and timestamped log file. The other is to append. Both ways are 'logrotateable'. I prefer separate files which require less parsing but as I said, whatever makes your boat floating :)
    1. Certainly, if for some reason Python doesn't suit you either you can install, let us say, PHP language. Well, I think you realize that the searching of suitable solution can go on for a long time and may be only MS Visual Basic will be lacking in the list of results. So, I believe the time has already approached to put it all aside and come to to the Point.
    2. But in all this incongruous abundance you'll certanly find the links to expect It's just what is wanted: the tool, which is traditionally used to communicate automatically with interactive programs. And as it always occurs, there is unfortunately a little fault in it: expect needs the programming language TCL to be present. Nevertheless if it doesn't discourage you to install and learn one more, though very powerful language, then you can stop your search, because expect and TCL with or without TK have everything and even more for you to write scripts.
    1. #2 Non-real-time variant - What about groups who don't like that real-time part of the game? We really think that is the best way to play, but we realize it isn't a fun or even possible option for everyone. We're including an alternative rule that removes all the speed elements and is still fun (in a different way).
    1. “It is less clear that way” — that is just arbitrary, even uninformed. There is nothing clearer about def self.method. As demonstrated earlier, once you grasp the true meaning of it, def self.method is actually more vague as it mixes scopes
    1. I strongly prefer this over Carcassonne. It plays faster (I don't want a tile laying game to go for more than 30 mins or so) and I happen to like the limited options. Carcassonne just gets on my nerves because I just don't view selecting between so many placement options to be that interesting. Obviously, YMMV. Ditto the previous statement, it's different than Carcassonne. And that's why I like it.
    1. While there are certain things most users will anticipate with any interface, there may be expected affordances that are unique to your users and the cohort they represent
    1. I respectfully disagree with your assessment. You are referencing the quote "It's not appropriate to use the aside element just for parentheticals, since those are part of the main flow of the document." However the OP specifically said that they are looking for a semantic element for "a note that may be useful to read at a given point of a tutorial, but is not part of the main tutorial flow". That is what "aside" is for. It's not part of the main content flow.

      That's a tough one. I can see it both ways.

    1. a remark or passage that departs from the theme of a discourse : digression The speaker inserted some often amusing parentheses during his speech.
    2. an amplifying (see amplify sense 1) or explanatory word, phrase, or sentence inserted in a passage from which it is usually set off by punctuation explained further in a parenthesis
    3. one or both of the curved marks ( )

      strange that it means one or both of them

    1. I must say I am quite surprised by so many negative reviews. To me this little game is pure genius. There's something about it you just can't put your finger on... something strange, hard to define. The premise is utterly simple - roll left or right - but the game keeps adding new possibilities every level. And it doesn't make a fuzz about it. "Here's something completely new, it's there, who cares". The mechanics and physics are spot on and the game explores them brilliantly. Visually it's beautiful and the characters you interact with are strange and fascinating. A feeling of novelty and discovery permeates the game from start to finish.Here's my suggestion: watch some videos of the gameplay and see if it bothers you. If not, go for it, for you've barely seen the tip of the iceberg.
    1. class AuthConstraint def initialize(&block) @block = block || ->(_) { true } end def matches?(req) user = current_user(req) user.present? && @block.call(user) end def current_user(req) User.find_by_id(session[:user_id]) end end This is a flexible approach to defining route access based on any desired variable (roles, auth, etc...)

      Good solution, and might be needed if you want to base routes on roles, etc. — but this one is even easier if all you need is for it to be conditional based on signed in or not (because devise provides authenticated helper):

      https://hyp.is/lRq8tpNXEeuNn_9NxqJvdA/stackoverflow.com/questions/32407598/rails-4-devise-set-default-root-route-for-authenticated-users

  8. Mar 2021
    1. This is gonna be an uphill slog and I'm really excited for it. If you know that's what you're getting into (a long slow grind on puzzles that may not fit well together), this could be great - especially if you're invested in both the work and the community (posting on here helps loads with games like this!) Your mileage may vary!
    1. Visible spectrum wrapped to join blue and green in an additive mixture of cyan

      the rainbow as a continuous (repeating) circle instead of semicircle

    1. but I like that Svelte comes with a good CSS story out the box.

      comes with a good CSS story out the box

    2. Svelte is different in that by default most of your code is only going to run once; a console.log('foo') line in a component will only run when that component is first rendered.
    1. In computer science, a tree is a widely used abstract data type that simulates a hierarchical tree structure

      a tree (data structure) is the computer science analogue/dual to tree structure in mathematics

    1. As to why both is_a? and kind_of? exist: I suppose it's part of Ruby's design philosophy. Python would say there should only be one way to do something; Ruby often has synonymous methods so you can use the one that sounds better. It's a matter of preference.
    1. non-regression testing

      That would probably be a better name because you're actually testing/verifying that there hasn't been any regression.

      You're testing for the absence of regression. But I guess testing for one also tests for the other, so it probably doesn't matter. (If something is not true you know it is false, etc.)

    1. Note that, although the modifying terms, fine and coarse are used consistently across all fields, the term granularity is not.
    1. Again, this is all opinion-based, and due to the sheer number of developers who rely on this technology as their bread and butter, sub-communities and religiousness forms around patterns, anti-patterns, practices, de-facto standards, micro-packages, polyfills, frameworks, build-tools, etc.
    2. For instance, those who prefer classical inheritance may enjoy the addition of the class keyword, while others may reject it as conflicting with the idea of a prototypical inheritance model.
    3. JavaScript, as a language, has some fundamental shortcomings — I think the majority of us agree on that much. But everyone has a different opinion on what precisely the shortcomings are.
    4. As to opinions about the shortcomings of the language itself, or the standard run-times, it’s important to realize that every developer has a different background, different experience, different needs, temperament, values, and a slew of other cultural motivations and concerns — individual opinions will always be largely personal and, to some degree, non-technical in nature.
    1. This is a huge disadvantage to all web developers. Why can't we at least have the ability to turn validation messages off? Why do we have to re-implement a validation system when you already have one in place, but all we want is the validation aspect and not the built in messaging? By taking away the ability to style elements that CHROME adds to the browser window, it is hurting developers professional appearance. We just want to use Chrome's WONDERFUL validation system with our own error messages. Either let us style them, or let us hide them, but don't make us re-invent the wheel just because you don't want our code to be "browser specific". Writing a new validation system just for Chrome is going to be much more "browser (chrome) specific" code than setting "::-webkit-validation-bubble, ::-webkit-validation-bubble * { display: none; }. This isn't just an annoyance, it's a huge disadvantage to any developer who wants to easily utilize Chrome's built in validation. I usually brag about how wonderful Chrome is, but I'm starting to think it's heading in another direction...

  9. Feb 2021
    1. it is inconvenient to write specific implementations for each datatype contained, especially if the code for each datatype is virtually identical. For example, in C++, this duplication of code can be circumvented by defining a class template
    1. There are two definitions of ‘Enterprise’ 1 - Enterprise as a business. In fact, in French, ‘enterprise’ literally means ‘business’ 2- Enterprise as a large business. This is the most common use of the term in business, differentiating between small, medium, and large businesses. In this context, there is no official rule, however it is generally accepted for enterprise to mean companies with over 1,000 employees and/or $1B in revenue
    1. a framework containing the basic assumptions, ways of thinking, and methodology that are commonly accepted by members of a scientific community. such a cognitive framework shared by members of any discipline or group:
    1. Nevermind, I use now reform-rails
    2. @adisos if reform-rails will not match, I suggest to use: https://github.com/orgsync/active_interaction I've switched to it after reform-rails as it was not fully detached from the activerecord, code is a bit hacky and complex to modify, and in overall reform not so flexible as active_interaction. It has multiple params as well: https://github.com/orgsync/active_interaction/blob/master/spec/active_interaction/modules/input_processor_spec.rb#L41

      I'm not sure what he meant by:

      fully detached from the activerecord I didn't think it was tied to ActiveRecord.

      But I definitely agree with:

      code is a bit hacky and complex to modify

    1. class FormsController < ApplicationController class SearchForm < ActiveModel::Form

      I kind of like how they put the form class nested directly inside the controller, although I would probably put it in its own file myself, unless it was quite trivial.

    1. Some people believed I argued that object orientation is bad simply because extends has problems, as if the two concepts are equivalent. That's certainly not what I thought I said, so let me clarify some meta-issues.

      first sighting: meta-issue 

    1. If you think you’ve conveyed something but the other person hears something completely different, is that their fault or yours? 
    2. From my perspective the onus is on you to consider not just the words coming out of your mouth, but how they are received.
    3. Everyone has their own background and context that they overlay on top of what they hear. It’s our jobs as communicators to consider that perspective and to adjust the way we communicate accordingly. If we do, we stand a better chance of persuading them to agree with our point of view.
    1. People often hear what they think should be said, not the words that are actually spoken. This comes from the tendency of people to think faster than they talk. A listener makes assumptions about what they expect because their minds race ahead. This can be especially problematic when you misinterpret what your boss said. 
    1. We got this email from Parabo, the print shop app, and smiled. Instead of the very standard “Please confirm subscription” header text, we were greeted with a funny, whimsical hello that’s totally in their brand voice. “We really want you to want us” is a clever way to break up the usual mundane greeting, and, guess what? It totally reaffirmed why we thought we wanted to sign up for their emails in the first place.
    1. Switching to Pop!_OS From Apple If you are coming from Apple’s operating system using Pop!_OS for the first time, we can help make the transition smoother.
    2. Switching to Ubuntu from Apple If you are coming from Apple’s operating system and just using Ubuntu for the first time, we can help make the transition a little smoother.
  10. Jan 2021
    1. If components gain the slot attribute, then it would be possible to implement the proposed behavior of <svelte:fragment /> by creating a component that has a default slot with out any wrappers. However, I think it's still a good idea to add <svelte:fragment /> so everyone who encounters this common use case doesn't have to come up with their own slightly different solutions.
    1. « Half solved » because, hey, still it’s proprietary so who knows ? You have to trust the software editor then, it’s just moving the trust cursor.
    2. If folks want to get together and create a snap-free remix, you are welcome to do so. Ubuntu thrives on such contribution and leadership by community members. Do be aware that you will be retreading territory that Ubuntu developers trod in 2010-14, and that you will encounter some of the same issues that led them to embrace snap-based solutions. Perhaps your solutions will be different. .debs are not perfect, snaps are not perfect. Each have advantages and disadvantages. Ubuntu tries to use the strengths of both.
    3. The “no-snaps” ship already sailed years ago…you folks missed that boat. It’s too late to wish for a return to the past. Snaps in Ubuntu have been happening for years already, and will continue regardless of any opinions expressed here.
    1. If you’re not a huge fan of Snap packages, but love using Ubuntu, this guide is for you. In it, we’ll go over how you can remove Snap from your Ubuntu system and make it so that your system will no longer have access to the Snap store or anything like that.
  11. Dec 2020
    1. It's true that Svelte does not allow you to map over children like React, but its slot API and <svelte:component> provide similarly powerful composition. You can pass component constructors as props and instantiate them with <svelte:component>, and use slots and their let bindings for higher order composition. It sounds like you're thinking in virtual DOM idioms instead of Svelte's.
    2. However, Svelte isn't React or Vue or any other framework, the same approach will not always work and given that Svelte has very different constraints and approach that works well in another framework is not suitable with Svelte. Trying to apply approaches use with other frameworks to Svelte will invariably end in frustration.
    1. Each area requires specific learning and thinking in a certain way. Front-end is user centric, back-end is closer to algorithms and parallel programming, databases require thinking in streams of data based on a model (similar to set theory and model checking).
  12. Nov 2020
    1. Others have already said how Flutter renders inside a canvas and how it's difficult/impossible for it to interact with other JS libraries (and why would you want to... the whole thing is so different that even the issues are solved by completely different libraries).
    1. Those frameworks are used in a similar fashion, but conceptually use quite different approaches (Vue is a more traditional one, a library, and Svelte is a "dissapearing framework").

      interesting wording: Svelte is a "disappearing framework".