177 Matching Annotations
  1. Apr 2021
    1. In many computing contexts, "TTY" has become the name for any text terminal, such as an external console device, a user dialing into the system on a modem on a serial port device, a printing or graphical computer terminal on a computer's serial port or the RS-232 port on a USB-to-RS-232 converter attached to a computer's USB port, or even a terminal emulator application in the window system using a pseudoterminal device.

      It's still confusing, but this at least helps/tries to clarify.

    1. The terminal emulator process must also handle terminal control commands, e.g., for resizing the screen.
    1. 2 out of 3 people in my household do not find it easy to understand. Maybe that is is not representative, but keep in mind that something you yourself understand (or in this case think you understand) always seems easy.
    2. Notice the use of Enter key after backslash in the sed command.
    3. Although echo "$@" prints the arguments with spaces in between, that's due to echo: it prints its arguments with spaces as separators.

      due to echo adding the spaces, not due to the spaces already being present

      Tag: not so much:

      whose responsibility is it? but more: what handles this / where does it come from? (how exactly should I word it?)

    1. However, some users didn’t know that they could interact with and click on the text field. It looked like an empty box. The line affordance under the old text fields was not clear to some users. The line was confused with a divider.
    2. The label and input were confused with body text, especially in dense compositions.
    1. We are continuing an overhaul of our default startup editor in order to provide relevant extension-contributed tips and walkthroughs, intended to make both core VS Code features and extension contributions more approachable to new users.
  2. Mar 2021
    1. Not to be confused with tree (graph theory), a specific type of mathematical object.

      Confusing: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tree_(data_structure) says

      Not to be confused with tree (graph theory) "Tree (graph theory)"), a specific type of mathematical object. but https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tree_(graph_theory) redirects to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tree_structure and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tree_structure is in category Trees (data structures) So is one a subtype/hyponym of the other ... or what?? How are they related? Skimming the articles a bit, esp. the first paragraph which clearly states as much ( :) ), I believe the answer is: a tree (data structure) is an implementation (in a programming language) of / or a "type that simulates" a hierarchical tree structure. a tree (data structure) is the computer science analogue/dual to tree structure in mathematics

    2. Not to be confused with trie, a specific type of tree data structure. Not to be confused with tree (graph theory), a specific type of mathematical object.
    1. The number one problem that I see developers have when practicing test-first development that impedes them from refactoring their code is that they over-specify behavior in their tests. This leads developers to write more tests than are needed, which can become a burden when refactoring code.
    1. Unfortunately, given how widely used concat_javascript_sources is, this required changing a lot of tests. It would be nice if we could remove some of the duplication in these tests (so that similar changes would not require updating this many tests), but that can come in another PR.
    1. An equation is any expression with an equals sign, so your example is by definition an equation. Equations appear frequently in mathematics because mathematicians love to use equal signs. A formula is a set of instructions for creating a desired result. Non-mathematical examples include such things as chemical formulas (two H and one O make H2O), or the formula for Coca-Cola (which is just a list of ingredients). You can argue that these examples are not equations, in the sense that hydrogen and oxygen are not "equal" to water, yet you can use them to make water.
    1. You’d think :empty would be it, but it’s not. That’s for matching things like <p></p>… container elements with nothing inside them. Inputs are no-content elements already.
    1. It is much easier to track what is going on within the activity. Instead of transporting additional state via ctx, you expose the outcome via an additional end event.

      Note: It's only super easy to see what's going on if you have the benefit of a diagram.

    2. So why the over-complication? What we got now is replicating a chain of && in the former version. This time, however, you will know which condition failed and what went in by using tracing. Look at the trace above - it’s impossible to not understand what was going on.
  3. Feb 2021
    1. Sass variables, like all Sass identifiers, treat hyphens and underscores as identical. This means that $font-size and $font_size both refer to the same variable. This is a historical holdover from the very early days of Sass, when it only allowed underscores in identifier names. Once Sass added support for hyphens to match CSS’s syntax, the two were made equivalent to make migration easier.
    1. Now you can easily spot them! The rule is: if you see a Result it means that this function can throw an exception. And you even know its type in advance.
    2. we also wrap them in Failure to solve the second problem: spotting potential exceptions is hard
    3. Almost everything in python can fail with different types of exceptions: division, function calls, int, str, generators, iterables in for loops, attribute access, key access, even raise something() itself may fail. I am not even covering IO operations here. And checked exceptions won’t be supported in the nearest future.
    4. You still need to have a solid experience to spot these potential problems in a perfectly readable and typed code.
    5. print will never be actually executed. Because 1 / 0 is an impossible operation and ZeroDivisionError will be raised.
    1. For this one we'll define a helper method to handle raising the correct errors. We have to do this because calling .run! would raise an ActiveInteraction::InvalidInteractionError instead of an ActiveRecord::RecordNotFound. That means Rails would render a 500 instead of a 404.

      True, but why couldn't it handle this for us?

    1. Yes, you do face difficult choices (moral) but you don't care about it. All you care are the reputation bars. So... Let's kill this guy, who cares if he is innocent, but this faction needs it or I'm dead. Sounds great on paper but to be honest... you just sit there and do whatever for these reputation bars. If you won't, then you lose
  4. Jan 2021
    1. We informed and documented. We made it easy for you to understand the problem and also to take action if you disagreed. I hope you didn’t read https://linuxmint-user-guide.readthedocs.io/en/latest/snap.html#how-to-install-the-snap-store-in-linux-mint-20. I can’t understand how it could be simpler.
    2. Is it harder to enable it in Mint than it is to disable it in Ubuntu? Not at all. Is how to enable it better documented in Mint than how to disable it in Ubuntu? Absolutely: https://linuxmint-user-guide.readthedocs.io/en/latest/snap.html.
    1. Note that the mere presence of this header causes premailer to be skipped, i.e., even setting skip_premailer: false will cause premailer to be skipped. The reason for that is that the skip_premailer is a simple header and the value is transformed into a string, causing 'false' to become truthy.
    1. If components gain the slot attribute, then it would be possible to implement the proposed behavior of <svelte:fragment /> by creating a component that has a default slot with out any wrappers. However, I think it's still a good idea to add <svelte:fragment /> so everyone who encounters this common use case doesn't have to come up with their own slightly different solutions.
    1. While it is easy to imagine that all iterators could be expressed as arrays, this is not true. Arrays must be allocated in their entirety, but iterators are consumed only as necessary. Because of this, iterators can express sequences of unlimited size, such as the range of integers between 0 and Infinity.
    1. I've reproduced, in a very simple way, what I would like it to do: https://svelte.dev/repl/2b0b7837e3ba44b5aba8d7e774094bb4?version=3.19.1

      This is the same URL as the original example given in issue description.

      I'm guessing what happened is they started with that one, made some changes, and then I think they must have forgot to save their modified REPL (which would have generated a new, unique URL).

    1. This is a dynamic value because of hybrid devices which can use a mix of mouse and touch input.
    1. It’s fairly common to assume that there is an onHover event handler in React, especially when you consider the naming conventions of the other event handlers, such as onClick, onSubmit, and onDrag.Why wouldn’t there be an onHover event in React?
    1. “JSONP is JSON with extra code” would be too easy for the real world. No, you gotta have little discrepancies. What’s the fun in programming if everything just works? Turns out JSON is not a subset of JavaScript. If all you do is take a JSON object and wrap it in a function call, one day you will be bitten by strange syntax errors, like I was today.
    1. Users want work be done. Not struggling about how allowing access to removable medias or such a file on another partition… Not breaking their habits or workflows each time a snap replaces a deb.
  5. Dec 2020
    1. No more waiting around for pull requests to be merged and published. No more forking repos just to fix that one tiny thing preventing your app from working.

      This could be both good and bad.

      potential downside: If people only fix things locally, then they may be less inclined/likely to actually/also submit a merge request, and therefore it may be less likely that this actually (ever) gets fixed upstream. Which is kind of ironic, considering the stated goal "No more waiting around for pull requests to be merged and published." But if this obviates the need to create a pull request (does it), then this could backfire / work against that goal.

      Requiring someone to fork a repo and push up a fix commit -- although a little extra work compared to just fixing locally -- is actually a good thing overall, for the community/ecosystem.

      Ah, good, I see they touched on some of these points in the sections:

      • Benefits of patching over forking
      • When to fork instead
    2. # fix a bug in one of your dependencies vim node_modules/some-package/brokenFile.js # run patch-package to create a .patch file npx patch-package some-package

      I love how directly this allows you to make the change -- directly on the source file itself -- and then patch-package does the actual work of generating a patch from it. Brilliant.

  6. developer.mozilla.org developer.mozilla.org
    1. In a browser, the chrome is any visible aspect of a browser aside from the webpages themselves (e.g., toolbars, menu bar, tabs). This is not to be confused with the Google Chrome browser.
  7. Nov 2020
    1. There is no rerender, when you call listen, then all scroll events will warn on chrome. See this entry from svelte: breaking the web

      Even the author of this library forgot this about Svelte?? :) (Or maybe he didn't and this response misunderstood/falsely assumed that he had.)

    1. if the value given in value is contained in the array that is the value for the field for the form

      distinction:

      • the value given in value prop of Field
      • the value for the field for the form (formState.values[field_name])
    1. I think you meant a different set of arguments to Object.assign ? should be Object.assign({}, api.headers, headers) because you don't want to keep adding custom headers into hash of common api.headers. right?
    1. I think what the author intended to do was check if the second argument was a non-empty string (which is not the same thing as checking whether there are more than 1 argument, as the second argument could be passed but be the empty string).
    1. When you email me, please include a minimal bash script that demonstrates the problem in the body of the email (not as an attachment). Also very clearly state what the desired output or effect should be, and what error or failure you are getting instead. You are much more likely to get a response if your script isn't some giant monster with obtuse identifiers that I would have to spend all afternoon parsing.
    2. You could decide to trust yourself and your teammates to always remember this special case. You can all freely use short-circuiting, but simply don't allow a short-circuit expression to be on the last line of a script, for anything actually deployed. This may work 100% reliably for you and your team, but I don't believe that is the case for myself and many other developers. Of course, some kind of linter or commit hook might help.
    1. It might seem too obvious but I've been struggling long time with this until I got that you need to include the base image too

      Thanks for the tip

    2. the "trick" is to pass to --cache-from the image you are rebuilding (and have it pulled already) and ALSO the image that it uses as base in the FROM.
    1. Svelte slots are much easier to use and reason about than Angular transclude, especially in cases where you don't want an extra wrapper element around the slot content.
  8. Oct 2020
    1. In a large code base, this will result in moving imports randomly around until stuff just happens to work. Which is often only temporary, as a small refactoring or change in import statements in the future can subtly adjust the module loading order, reintroducing the problem.
    1. A simple rule of thumb: the name of the updated variable must appear on the left hand side of the assignment. For example this... const foo = obj.foo; foo.bar = 'baz';...won't update references to obj.foo.bar, unless you follow it up with obj = obj.
    1. One of the significant differences between the two is that a call to a partially applied function returns the result right away, not another function down the currying chain; this distinction can be illustrated clearly for functions whose arity is greater than two.
    1. Looks like the problem is that debounce defaults to waiting for 0 ms ... which is completely useless!

      It would be (and is) way to easy to omit the 2nd parameter to https://lodash.com/docs/4.17.15#debounce.

      Why is that an optional param with a default value?? It should be required!

      There must be some application where a delay of 0 is useless. https://www.geeksforgeeks.org/lodash-_-debounce-method/ alludes to / implies there may be a use:

      When the wait time is 0 and the leading option is false, then the func call is deferred until to the next tick.

      But I don't know what that use case is. For the use case / application of debouncing user input (where each character of input is delayed by at least 10 ms -- probably > 100 ms -- a delay of 0 seems utterly useless.

    2. It looks like you accidentally passed resolve() (immediately invoking the function) directly to setTimeout rather than passing a function to invoke it. So it was being resolved immediately instead of after a 1000 ms delay as intended.

      I guess this is the "immediately invoked function" problem.

      Not to be confused with: immediately invoked function expression. (Since it is a regular named function and not a function expression.)

    3. You should not create a new debounce function on every render with: return new Promise(resolve => { debounce(() => resolve(this.getIsNameUnique(name)), 2000); }); Instead you should just wrap your whole function isNameUnique with the debounce (see my sandbox). By creating a new debounce function on every hit, it cannot 'remember' that is was called or that is will be called again. This will prevent the debouncing.
    1. _.debounce creates a function that debounces the function that's passed into it. What your s.search function is doing is calling _.debounce all over again every time s.search is called. This creates a whole new function every time, so there's nothing to debounce.
    2. I run s.search() by typing into an input box, and if I type gibberish very quickly, the console prints out "making search request" on every key press, so many times per second -- indicating that it hasn't been debounced at all.
    3. they're not invoking the function that _.debounce returns
    1. Furthermore, JSX encourages bad non-dry code. Having seen a lot of JSX over the past few months, its encourages copypasta coding.
    2. hyperscript is much simpler to refactor and DRY up your code than with JSX, because, being vanilla javascript, its easier to work with variable assignment, loops and conditionals.
    1. I suppose it all comes down to tooling. It should be easy to author a pattern. A set of implicit (possibly explicit) patterns to author patterns may be useful.
    1. Note that if you are calling reset() and not specify new initial values, you must call it with no arguments. Be careful to avoid things like promise.catch(reset) or onChange={form.reset} in React, as they will get arguments passed to them and reinitialize your form.
  9. Sep 2020
    1. The problem I have with this approach to state and prop variables is that the difference between them is very blurry. In React you can clearly see that a prop is an input to component (because of clear function notation), and that state is something internal. In Svelte they are both just variables, with the exception that props use export keyword.

      This is something I've seen before: people noticing that Svelte is missing some kind of naming convention.

      React has use___ convention, for example. Without that, it makes it hard to see the difference between and know just from the name that a function is an (mentioned in the other article I read) action and not a event handler or even component, for example.

    1. Knowing what is expected allows a person using assistive technology to prepare a conversation starter.

      interesting method of planning ahead and showing how most easy conversation is predictable

    1. When a component reaches such a size that this becomes a problem, the obvious course of action is to refactor it into multiple components. But the refactoring is complex for the same reason: extracting the styles that relate to a particular piece of markup is an error-prone manual process, where the relevant styles may be interleaved with irrelevant ones.
    1. I think this is being rejected on grounds that are too arbitrary, and detract from what to me are the best things about Svelte -- it's fun and easy to use, and lets you write components in a way that's natural and expressive.
  10. Aug 2020