56 Matching Annotations
  1. May 2020
    1. OLPC created a novel technology, the XO laptop, developed with close at-tention to the needs of students in poor rural areas. Yet it failed to anticipate the social and institutional problems that could arise in trying to diffuse that innovation in the developing-country context.

      In theory this sounds great and Brown and Thomas would be proud of this, but the reality is funding for the project and yes it might become a great project, but districts need money and more money to purchase new ones as they become dated or broken.

  2. Jan 2020
    1. firenen

      firenena (peuple, nation, tribu)<br> radical reny (mère [nom])<br> pas sûr qu'il existe un circonstanciel irenena, je ne sais pas comment détailler le processus morphologique.

      il désigne une communauté plus vaste que foko qu'on trouve plus loin.

  3. Dec 2019
  4. Jul 2019
    1. there'sanextraordinarydemocraticstructureinsideconcentrationcamps

      This is just a fatally stupefying statement.

      This video segment shows this as WBJ says it.

    2. Iwasbeingsarcastic.Yeah.WhatIwastalkingabout,yeah,notonlysarcas·tic,butalsowrong

      Seen just here in this video.

    3. Butdon'tyourealizethatinyourbook,andelsewhere,BU:youtrenotwillingtobeconsistentincarryingoutthis,argument.
    4. FIRINGLINE-#143-page26
    5. Andofwhatbroughtusto/Vietnaminthefirstinstance,inmyjudgment,wasclearlyanmninterested
  5. Oct 2018
  6. Dec 2017
    1. How does an insubstantial word like “apple” lead you to think of a real thing—an object of a certain size that is red, round, sweet, and has a shiny, thin-peeled skin? How could a plain acoustic sound produce such complex states of mind, involving all those qualities of color, substance, taste, and shape? Presumably, each different quality involves a different agency. But then—in view of all we’ve said about why different agents can’t communicate—how could such varying recipients all “understand” the selfsame messages? Do language-agents have unusual abilities to communicate with different kinds of agencies?

      What article doesn't bring up is the context of the environment that the person grew up in. If we were to describe the word apple to someone who has never seen or tasted it, they would not be able to visualize what it is with just the word. The mind would try to relate it to an object that you have already experience to fill in what an "apple" may be.

  7. Nov 2017
    1. Accordingly, the correct instrumental definition of technology still does not show us technology’s essence.

      Technology's essence is more than the ability of humans to control it, as thought with most previous technologies. While establishing definitions in the introduction, Heidegger finds it important to establish a distinction between what was instrumental to technology in the past and what we will find technology can become without definitions that limit technology to something outside of the basic, instrumental necessities.

  8. Oct 2017
    1. All our steps in creating or absorbing material of the record proceed through one of the senses—the tactile when we touch keys, the oral when we speak or listen, the visual when we read. Is it not possible that some day the path may be established more directly?

      Throughout reading this article I couldn't help but laugh at the dramatic irony of our experience as students in 2017 reading Bush's predictions for the future of mechanics and technology in 1991. He speaks with a bit of wonderment, obviously trying to shock the reader with ideas considered fantastical at the time and then undermining them as "not so fantastic;" the joke of course being that even his most fantastic ideas seem rudimentary to us. That is, until I reached this part of the article, where Bush's predictions seem to have closely aligned with those of our own in the modern era. In this quote he seems to suggest a total departure from the tactile, oral, visual, and so on. Whether explicitly or not, Bush is referencing transcendence of machine (mechanical or digital) which, when you think about it, is a "fantastic" notion even by our standards of technology in 2017.

    1. Education generates habits of application, order and the love of virtue; and controuls, by the force of habit, any innate obliquities in our moral organization.

      I like this quote because this is an example of how we can use our positive fundamental historical beliefs to fight against our negative history. Education is extremely value and UVa is constantly trying to expand knowledge, especially shown through this New Curriculum. Through expanding knowledge and education to help form our morals, we can learn to balance our controversial history with recent events and fight to be a culturally aware and genuinely progressive University. If students are aware and knowledgable, there's so much a student body can do to progress out society. -Ella S.

    2. What, but education, has advanced us beyond the condition of our indigenous neighbours? and what chains them to their present state of barbarism & wretchedness, but a besotted veneration for the supposed supe[r]lative wisdom of their fathers and the preposterous idea that they are to look backward for better things and not forward, longing, as it should seem, to return to the days of eating acorns and roots rather than indulge in the degeneracies of civilization.

      Even in our formation of the University, we believed higher education meant supremacy. When UVa didn't allow black people into the school, we believed we were superior and they weren't allowed to have the higher education we have. Even now when we look at demographics, the minority percentage is so low, it seems as if we still follow this superiority complex of education for white people. -Ella S.

    3. with him

      The way language was used back then gives a good index of what cultural views were back 200 years ago - especially on the subject of gender. It would be difficult to say whether or not the founders of the University were explicitly sexist based on the language used in the Rockfish Gap Report, but it we can conclude with a fair amount of certainty that men were typically seen as those who held positions of power.

      Jedidiah Park

    4. Military Architecture, includes Fortification, another branch of that art

      Although it may seem strikingly odd that a subject called "military architecture" would be put in a list with many other subjects we are used to seeing taught in a university, it actually is very fitting given the time period. America was a new country and a strong military was something seen as necessary to protect sovereignty. To this day, America puts a lot of emphasis on military strength and many branches of engineering put a focus on defense and military. So in a sense, military architecture is probably still taught, just under a different name and different conventions today.

      Jedidiah Park

    5. each of these was unexceptionable as to healthiness & fertility.

      The focus on healthiness and fertility reminds me sickeningly of the treatment of slaves and of women throughout history, as land, a place for a school to be built, was regarded in the same way that human beings were -- property; only worthy of life if they met specific criteria. A slave was only useful if it was healthy enough to perform the work necessary of its existence (as the slave owners thought). If a slave could not work in a field or in the home, they were a useless slave and often times killed for their inability to perform. The fertility of a slave and it's ability to reproduce was profitable as slave owners were able to buy a slave (if they raped their females) or two (male and female), and have their slave continue to produce more slaves and therefore more bodies able to do the slaveowner's biding. Such is similar to the view of women, as health and fertility were the most important aspects of a woman to society, besides obedience. Women's fertility could be manipulated and used for gain of both men and society. In some instances, women were only considered worthy of life if they produced male offspring. Such is seen in royalty, as King Henry vehemently believed that Catherine "was condemned by God not to have a boy and that Anne would provide him with one". This belief that the only worth of a woman is their ability to produce male heirs was carried into society for a long time after the Tudor times. And although the thoughts towards women are not as strict in modern society, the stigma towards women unable to have children or who do not want children has continued into modern society.

      source link : http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/tudor-england/henry-and-divorce/

    6. “the branches of learning,

      I find this phrase "branches of learning" interesting, as it implies that learning stems from a singular object, which in essence is a university. It is a very remarkable way to think of learning, as the university is the foundation for learning, but the different branches (topics) stem from not only what is taught officially at the university in classrooms, but also from the experiences that occur here and people that call this place home. I know that this statement did not mean what I think it means now back when it was written, but I still find it a beautiful way to talk about learning. The metaphor of a tree implies that roots in the university - the land it was built on, the people who built it, the people who used to live on this land - can affect the university and the way students learn from it and on it. Such is so applicable to today as we are attempting to embrace the rotten roots of our dear university, attempting to learn from the injustisces against humanity that occurred on and before our university.

    7. What, but education, has advanced us beyond the condition of our indigenous neighbours?

      Here, as others have mentioned, Jefferson shows his intolerance for people of other cultures and races. I assume the "indigenous neighbours" he refers to are the Native Americans that we as Americans kicked out of their land and homes. To answer his rhetorical question, obviously things other than education have advanced people beyond their condition: race, for one thing, allows white people to gain a great advantage over indigenous people, whether educated or not. In addition, there are many types of education, as can be seen earlier when Jefferson discusses the inevitability of people arguing over what types of education should be mandatory at UVA, saying they will encounter "much difference of opinion." Therefore, who is Jefferson to call them less educated just because they are educated in different ways than white people? Sometimes it is easy to be blinded from some of Jefferson's less likeable opinions, and it is important to recognize these qualities when learning about him and the University's past. Matt F. Discussion

    8. each of these was unexceptionable as to healthiness & fertility.

      I find this to be very ironic that a deciding factor of the university location was the area's fertility, and yet another factor is the "centrality to the white population." These two things seem to almost contradict one another when taking in the context of the time period. Fertility, to me, means how well an area can be farmed and used for planting things, etc. In that time, many slaves worked on plantations and areas that would be fertile so as to make good profit. So it seems that many areas of land that would be fertile would have a larger population of African-Americans than in non-fertile areas of Virginia. This, then, makes it seem rather ironic that they want it to be fertile AND in an area central to white people, considering anywhere that is fertile is not going to be only white. Perhaps this is a stretch, but this jumped out at me and showed the irony of wanting to be in a mainly white area, yet also wanting fertility. Matt F. Discussion

    1. I find myself wondering too whether he has a private ritual of purification, carried out behind closed doors, to enable him to return and break bread with other men. Does he wash his hands very carefully, perhaps, or change all his clothes; or has the Bureau created new men who can pass without disquiet between the unclean and the clean?

      The magistrate has all this disbelief for all of the inhumanity that Joll has been showing ever since he arrived, so he wants to believe that in order for Joll to walk this earth without remorse that he is somehow able to "clean" himself of all of the cruelty. By showing the inhumanity of Joll and the men that follow him, we are able to see the humanity in the magistrate. For him it is impossible not to feel empathy for the prisoners and even more so being that brutal; especially, not without having a ritual that would help him be a clean man.

    1. To testify to a history of oppression is necessary, but it is not sufficient unless that history is redirected into intellectual process and universalized to include all sufferers. Yet too often testimony to oppression becomes only a justification for further cruelty and inhumanity,

      Here, Said is telling us that in order for history of oppression to have a purpose, it needs to be used in such a way where all of the voices of all of the oppressed can be heard or else we only hear the voices that justify tyranny. I think this is true and still remains true today, because if we only get that one part of history that has some justification, nothing changes. This is why history repeats itself; we don't look at exactly all of the suffering that happens.

    2. He now intervened to defend imperialism, saying in tones of almost comic reverence, that it had accomplished things that natives couldn’t have done for themselves. It had taught them, among other things, he said, how to appreciate the cuneiform and hieroglyphics of their own traditions

      Imperialism is a huge part of the formation of some of the large empires that we study throughout history. While Said is saying that the man speaking is defending imperialism i think he is portraying a part of it that can be very destructive. The man talks about how these people who may or may not be a large empire have decided that the native peoples are in need of their help whether or not it has actually been asked for. also, how can you teach a people more about their own writings if they are in fact the ones that wrote it?

    3. It is important to note that much of the early cultural resistance to imperialism on which nationalism and independence movements were built was salutary and necessary.

      Cultural resistance to imperialism ultimately resulted to the idea of nationalism and independence in specific places that weren't being governed correctly or fairly. These specific places felt out of place or were feeling that they weren't even part of the world rather just a part of another bigger country or nation. They are reclaiming their identity by claiming their independence. They become their own nation/race/category, what ever it may be. This is where we see the idea that they were simply being part of an Empire, but they desired to become their own for their own identity's sake (culture/race) so they begin to advocate against imperialism. The fact that these places/categories/race were trying to separate themselves from powerful empires resulted in those empires' to crumble to ruins as they began losing power.

  9. Sep 2017
    1. Even if government may (and perhaps must) monitor and regulate the way that drugs or TMS devices affect our health and safety, there may be aspects of the way we use such cognitive enhancement tools that should be reserved by the Constitution (or perhaps through other means) solely for free and unrestricted individual choice.

      Except mind altering drugs often affect more than the individual themselves. Autonomy out to give way, in instances like these, to the greater public good/safety. Our choices always affect more than just ourselves.

    2. One could conceivably argue that just as these personal decisions about medical procedures are insulated from the state power, so, too, should be the decisions someone makes about whether to receive a particular kind of psychiatric or psychological treatment.

      Except states regularly infringe upon these rights and/or limit/remove the means of exercising such rights

    3. Thus, the Court has drawn on the Constitution—and specifically its “due process” requirements and the safeguards they raise against arbitrary restrictions on bodily freedom—to assure that government does not impose such treatment on prisoners or mental patients without powerful reasons.

      This is false. For instance, there are countless documented cases in which the state has forcibly sterilized prisoners or used unwilling sterilization as a means of obtaining early parole for segments of the population deemed lesser (i.e., women of color, poor people, etc.)

    4. It is up to me, not the state, what beliefs I adopt, what opinions I voice, or what religion I practice.

      Except not really. Social institutions like school, religion, saluting the flag, etc. socialize us into acceptable thought/behavior. We are free, to an extent, to rebel against these socializations, but rarely without backlash from friends, family, community, etc. See also: Red Scare

    5. Indeed, as noted earlier, one well-known thought-enhancement technology is written language itself and perhaps use of language more generally. As Levy writes, “speech does not merely allow us to articulate thoughts that we would have had in any case. Instead, it allows us to externalize our thoughts and thereby treat them as objects for contemplation and manipulation. Externalized thoughts can be worked over, criticized, and improved.”21:38-39

      This is an interesting concept, particularly with regards to writing, because many people, myself included, think as they write. I often times do not even really know what I think about a topic until I start writing about it. Essays, for example, are usually difficult to start, but I end up figuring out what my argument is by the end because the process of writing itself has allowed me to think through the subject in a way normal biological cognition would not normally allow me to.

    1. – Well, it’s masquerading as a sci-fi novel but it’s really, uh, my own personal manifesto about the plight of the individual in the 21st century. I sort of created a utopian society where we all sort of… Uh… Uh… It’s really… it’s really… Uh…

      In this statement, our narrator explains to us the premise of his novel. I picked this statement in particular because it represents the casually slippery slope of transhumanism. Here, he says that his novel was ultimately supposed to be its own science fiction alternative universe, when really he was hiding little pieces of his personal experience with the changing roles of humans and machines through a fictional world. He then says he wished to create a utopian society where they assumably functioned together harmoniously, while trailing off an unable to imagine or comprehend a vision of what the future holds for a transhuman relationships.

    1. Everyone knows the two statements that answer our question. One says: Technology is a means to an end. The other says: Technology is a human activity. The two definitions of technology belong together. For to posit ends and procure and utilize the means to them is a human activity.

      Heidegger attempts to define the foundation of his argument by creating an absolute. Rather than stating "One could define technology as..." or even "Many accredited scholars and scientists agree technology is...." our author goes for the jugular and declares "Everyone knows..." With this statement he hopes to not only construct the platform for his essay, but also make his concept irrefutable by cementing it in the court of public opinion. With these choice words, he may even subtly convince readers with undefined opinions to adopt this perspective. Because for many people, being told - even discreetly - that they are different and alone in their thoughts is enough to sway the silent majority in many cases.

    2. Everywhere we remain unfree and chained to technology, whether we passionately affirm or deny it. But we are delivered over to it in the worst possible way when we regard it as something neutral

      In today's society it is common to hear that we are chained to our smartphones, computers, and other personal electronics.The author is supporting this by saying that we are imprisoned by technology even if we like it or not. The author is also suggesting that if we resist technology our lives would be harder than it already is.

    1. The discussion remains mired at a relatively abstract level about the ethics of procedures like cloning or stem cell research, and divided into one camp that would like to permit everything and another camp that would like to ban wide areas of research and practice.

      Very little should be seen as this black or white. Almost everything lies in the grey in between. To have such a one sided perspective could be reason for lack of progress.

    1. Well, I don’t think there is any question about it. It can only be attributable to human error. This sort of thing has cropped up before  and it has always been due to human error.

      this was left on the cutting room floor, but Hal's behavior can actually be attributed to human error. In the novelized version written by co-screenplay author - the famous Arthur C. Clarke - it is stated that Hal is briefed on the mission, but told to lie about it and obfuscate the facts about the mission and it's details to the crew. It is implied that this is what ultimately makes Hal malfunction. This helped me to understand this movement in the context of the film far more easily, and it also highlights Heidegger's focus on mankind's responsibility to it's technology and those unintended consequences.

    2. Open the door, Hal. Rotate pod, please, Hal. Stop pod rotation, please, Hal. Rotate the pod, please, Hal. Rotate the pod, please, Hal.

      This movie took place in the future. However there are many parallels it has to present day. Hal, the artifical intellegence on the spaceship, reminds me of A.I personal assistance that we have today. For example, Amazon Echo, Google Home, and Siri. They all were created by humans, for the sole purpose of making life easier. These personal assistance devices can play music, turn off lights, and adjust the temperature in a house. Which is similar to Hal on a spaceship. With that it in mind it is terrifying to see how technology could turn against us and malfunction, like how the director portrayed Hal. Hal seemed perfect at first, but later on in the movie he began to malfunction. This portrays that humans can try to make technology perfect, but there is always human error which makes it vulnerable to malfunctions.

    3. – Two days ago, one of our rocket buses was denied permission for an emergency landing.

      I have never seen this movie, so the start of this scene is a bit confusing. Why are these people secluded from what seems like the rest of society? I also notice that there are no people of color aboard on this "rocket bus;" it seems like only the upper class are included so far.

    1. Good proposed a meta-golden rule, which might be paraphrased as “Treat your inferiors as you would be treated by your superiors.” Its a wonderful, paradoxical idea

      The author provides us here with some insightful guidance for navigating the pitfalls of technology in our near future. However, the dichotomy is that this poetic and magnanimous declaration is also implicitly self-serving. 'Let's be benevolent to our creations, so they don't rise up and incarcerate us.' This statement shows the complexity and discord of the human animal. I agree with Vinge that we should indeed adopt this philosophy in the future. I doubt that will happen though, as we don't do it now. As a rule, we don't treat 'lesser' species with any regard or 'humanity'. We don't even treat other humans with much compassion. The difference in living conditions and experiences from the richest of humans to the poorest would be inconceivable and rage inducing. We exploit the animals and our planet all to 'better' ourselves and get shiny new stuff. This duality comes from both our insecurity, and our hubris. Another quote sums this up succinctly. "In humans, the hardest development problems have already been solved." It would seem that even the authors think we've got it all figured out, even though they spend most of their piece warning of and impending techno-doom. But we haven't got anything figured out. Humanity is like a five-year-old with a gun. Do we really need a bigger gun?

    2. Large computer networks (and their associated users) may “wake up” as superhumanly intelligent entities.

      The author refers to both the computer network and its user when he refers to them "waking up." This may be a prediction of a soon to be symbiotic relation to us and technology. We are already using technology to mange our social life, our infrastructure, and even our health with pacemaker. We are already living in a world where we are inseparable from technology, but will we one day be completely be inseparable?

    3. Computers that are “awake”

      Saying that computers are "awake," creates a relationship between deception and consciousness. When computers are turned on, one may personify them to be "awake," but they are not actually conscious; they are deceptively "waking up." This mirrors how the author sees human beings and technology, as one in the same.

    4. Computers that are “awake” and superhumanly intelligent may be developed. (To date, there has been much controversy as to whether we can create human equivalence in a machine.

      The author speculated of technology that could think for itself, in other words Artificial Intelligence. Surprisingly, these things already exists. For example the computer developed by IBM, "Deep Blue". This computer was created for the sole purpose of thinking for itself and playing chess. This computer even beat a word champion in chess, Garry Kasparov. Although, this computer could only think about one thing this still support the fact that super humanly intelligent computers could be developed.

    1. Admittedly, most high-tech interventions in the body’s functioning aim merely at restoring ordinary human health, or else at least opposing its decline. But that might easily change as our methods grow in power. Already, many interventions do much more than this, or something rather different

      Not to sound ominous, but this could be considered the path to a slippery slope. Blackford asserts that these advancements have indeed started out with the best of intentions, the may however - like many technologies before them - leave humanity with unintended and dire consequences it their wake. For example, amazing breakthroughs like GPS embedded microchips can track your children's whereabouts in an emergency. Conversely, humans can now be tracked anywhere on the globe by anyone with the means.

    2. Transhumanists speak, too, of transcendence or transformations (but again, not of a “beyond” or a transcendent order).

      I think that this quotation makes clear the fact that transhumanism is similar to secular ideology in the sense that both are entities striving to achieve something greater than the natural human being. However, the difference in the two lies in the purpose of the wanted "transcendence". To be honest I didn't have a clear understanding of what the author is trying to say in this essay so don't regard this as correct; but rather as what I got from it.

    3. Pill is now, and much like “mere” tools such as cellphones or computers.

      This part of the text is a good example of how technology has become transparent because cellphones and other computers are used so regularly that the knowledge of how to use them, are second nature; however, social groups that are excluded from this idea are the lower class whom cannot afford such luxuries. Most of these examples seem to be geared towards the upper middle class.

    4. At some point, we may be able to make extensive modifications to human DNA, body tissues, or neurophysiological functioning, or to merge our bodies with sophisticated cybernetic devices.

      In this passage the author is allowing his intended audience, people who are curious in transhumanism, a glimpse into the future when technology merges with the human body. At this point one must question at what point does technology becomes a prosthesis? The author uses this imagery of technology merging with our body to form prosthesis, devices that function as a artificial body part, to suggest that technology at one point may be an extension of the human body. This extension of the human body supports his trans humanist ideas because it may allow a person to reach beyond their human potential.

    5. Female fertility is not an injury or disease, and the Pill is not (in its most common use) a treatment or a cure. Indeed, it suppresses a bodily function, but in a way that gives women greater power, helping them control when they can and cannot reproduce.

      I have to argue with this. Everyone seems to think that the only thing pill is capable of doing is preventing pregnancy. The pill can be used in other ways as well. Some women can have hormonal imbalances in their bodies and can have an abnormal menstrual cycle. With an abnormal menstrual cycle some women can have issues such as experiencing menstrual cycles for the whole month, or even skip months without getting their period. With an abnormal cycle it is very hard to regulate these cycles and know when they are supposed to start or end. The pill contains hormones which helps keep these cycles regulated. The pill can even reduce pain from PMS which is a plus because some cramps can be unbelievably painful. The pill can even help with acne and other such problems. These are just some of the benefits the pill is capable of doing. In the paragraph he says that the pill is not a treatment or a cure but that is just plain wrong. The pill is helping cure many women who experience hormonal problems.

  10. Jan 2017
    1. No, I will not release this on F-Droid. I actually looked into it and ended up wasting quite a bit of time jumping through the hoops of their submission process before realizing it was blocked by a conflict of interest. It's not for lack of trying.Pale Moon may meet the requirements of Open Source distribution through it, but F-Droid doesn't meet the requirements of proper developer control over my own product to distribute through them. F-Droid is simply not for Pale Moon since:I cannot sign my own packages (all developers there have to allow F-Droid to sign their software and publish it with F-Droid's signature)I cannot control the build environment used to build the binaries (they build the program on their server)I cannot test the binaries before releaseIf there is a problem with the binaries (either by accident or on purpose), it will immediately reflect on me while it would be F-Droid's fault. This puts F-Droid in a position of power over software developers that I am not comfortable with (nor should any other app developer be).They don't accept pre-built APKs (with the single exception of MozCo's builds of Mozilla Firefox, because, well, I guess they are in some sort of agreement there - who knows why they have this one very notable exception...).F-Droid operators are also not happy about the prerequisites for building Pale Moon since it has a lot of dependencies and is very complex to build. I can't go and redesign the build requirements just to satisfy their needs for building on their side (which I don't want to begin with)At least some of the operators there seem to think MPL or FOSS = Public Domain... They are explicitly forbidden to build Pale Moon with official name and branding from source, as a result.More details in the pull request discussion: https://gitlab.com/fdroid/fdroiddata/merge_requests/260
    1. En av Norges mest korrupte mennesker dette. Ikke engang mye vits å lese hva han mener om noe,fordi det er enten løgn eller så er det dårlige ideer. I verste fall begge deler.

  11. Dec 2016
  12. Oct 2016
    1. Online

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  13. Sep 2015
    1. to prove this, let facts be submitted to a candid world, for the truth of which we pledge a faith yet unsullied by falsehood.

      The Declaration of Independence impacted the United States in more ways than one, Jefferson makes clear when he states "to prove this, let facts be submitted to a candid world;" he is referring to the reign of the King of Great Britain who has brought injuries and tyranny over the states. He wants his people to realize the corruption and wrongdoings that the king has caused. Jefferson is essentially saying that people should be uncorrupt in this new world and man should strive to preserve the pureness of this country keeping it from falsehood and injustice. It sparked my attention when I came across a newspaper titled "The North Briton" written by J. Wilkes and others which contained very similar diction and ideals of society during that time period. Wilkes is criticizing King George III for his speech in favor of the Treaty of Paris ending the Seven Year’s War; he states “Articles 15 is for having corrupted the sacred fountain of truth and put falsehoods into the mouth of Majesty, in several speeches made in parliament.” Wilkes is trying to uncover the king’s corruption and bring to light that he is lying to his people which ties closely to Jefferson’s actions and morals of being uncorrupt. Most people carried similar beliefs in the United States during the 18th century, it is very possible that the Wilkes could have been from Jefferson's era carrying the same ideals and values as him due to similar style of writing, choice of diction, and beliefs.

    1. let facts be submitted to a candid world, for the truth of which we pledge a faith yet unsullied by falsehood.

      The Declaration of Independence impacted the United States in more ways than one, Jefferson makes clear that essentially people should be uncorrupt in this new world and man should strive to preserve the pureness of this country and keep from falsehood and lies. It sparked my attention when I came across a monthly chronologer titled "The Gentleman's and London magazine" that contained very similar diction and ideals of society during that time period. It is noticed that humans are habitual creatures and mimic their peers within their society creating a universal diction within that community. Most people carried similar beliefs in the United States during the 18th century since most citizens were of Christian faith it is very possible that the writers of the "Gentleman's and London Magazine" could have been from Jefferson's era having the same ideals and values as him due to similar style of writing and choice of diction.

  14. Feb 2014
  15. localhost:3000 localhost:3000
    1. This problem shoulb be solved by the Hypothes.is team eventually

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