34 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. The middle character, Ze, is a generational name, and is common to all his siblings (such as his brothers and sister, 毛泽民 (Mao Ze Min), 毛泽覃 (Mao Ze Tan), and 毛泽紅 (Mao Ze Hong)).

      interesting, did not know that. How are these generational characters determined?

  2. Jun 2020
    1. In systems engineering and requirements engineering, a non-functional requirement (NFR) is a requirement that specifies criteria that can be used to judge the operation of a system, rather than specific behaviors. They are contrasted with functional requirements that define specific behavior or functions

      This is a strange term because one might read "non-functional" and interpret in the sense of the word that means "does not function", when instead the intended sense is "not related to function". Seems like a somewhat unfortunate name for this concept. A less ambiguous term could have been picked instead, but I don't know what that would be.

  3. May 2020
    1. "linked data" can and should be a very general term referring to any structured data that is interlinked/interconnected.

      It looks like most of this article describes it in that general sense, but sometimes it talks about URIs and such as if they are a necessary attribute of linked data, when that would only apply to Web-connected linked data. What about, for example, linked data that links to each other through some other convention such as just a "type" and "ID"? Maybe that shouldn't be considered linked data if it is too locally scoped? But that topic and distinction should be explored/discussed further...

      I love its application to web technologies, but I wish there were a distinct term for that application ("linked web data"?) so it could be clearer from reading the word whether you meant general case or not. May not be a problem in practice. We shall see.

      Granted/hopefully most use of linked data is in the context of the Web, so that the links are universal / globally scoped, etc.

    1. This change was made because GitLab License Management is now renamed to GitLab License Compliance. After review with users and analysts, we determined that this new name better indicates what the feature is for, aligns with existing market terminology, and reduces confusion with GitLab subscription licensing features.
  4. Apr 2020
    1. The common law—so named because it was "common" to all the king's courts across England—originated in the practices of the courts of the English kings in the centuries following the Norman Conquest in 1066.[10] The British Empire spread the English legal system to its colonies, many of which retain the common law system today. These "common law systems" are legal systems that give great weight to judicial precedent, and to the style of reasoning inherited from the English legal system.
    2. the body of law derived from judicial decisions of courts and similar tribunals.[1][2][3][4][5][6] The defining characteristic of “common law” is that it arises as precedent.

      The way "common law" sounds and is used, I would have thought it meant law that is common (in common between) many countries, laws that can be found on the books in all of these many places. (Kind of like commonwealth.)

      But, although it is common to many countries, that is not its defining characteristic. Its defining characteristic is actually something quite different.

      Since the term is so far removed from what it actually means, I would even go so far as to say it is a mild euphemism.

      Much better names for this exist: judicial precedent or judge-made law are the clearest options. But even "case law" is a better term.

    1. The “universal” label that has been slapped on to it is superfluous, but it does have its merits. Now that we have a commonly known term to refer to environment agnostic JavaScript code, it allows library authors to list it as a feature and be fashionable doing it. I’m happy with the term “universal” being fashionable because it makes developers think about their dependencies on the runtime environment. In the end this will help the JavaScript ecosystem mature and allow libraries to be used everywhere.
    2. The “universal” label that has been slapped on to it is superfluous
    1. It’s true that there are two hard problems in computer science and one of them is naming things. Why? Because good names are important. A good name teaches about purpose and responsibility, so you have to spend some time thinking about it.
  5. Mar 2020
    1. Don't be discouraged when you get feedback about a method that isn't all sunshine and roses. Facets has been around long enough now that it needs to maintain a certain degree of quality control, and that means serious discernment about what goes into the library. That includes having in depth discussions the merits of methods, even about the best name for a method --even if the functionality has been accepted the name may not.

      about: merits

  6. Dec 2019
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  9. May 2019
    1. All "mainline" beers based on historic railroad culture; Many mentions of local ingredients; many mentions of brewed in the "classic style of...."

  10. Feb 2019
    1. Many •. ,~ . .• .., words name r

      Names...connects to...someone? I can't remember.

    2. real constitution, or (as it is apt to be called) essence, being utterly unknown to us, any sound that is put to stand for it must be very un· certain in its application;

      Basically, be careful about naming anything that has an essence that's unknown to us, and it seems that most everything has an uncertain essence, so...

    3. Names, therefore, that stand for collections of ideas which the mind makes at pleasure must needs be of doubtful signification, when such collections are nowhere to be found constantly united in nature

      Significance of names again, which play a role in Annihilation

      When people/things are stripped of their names (aka "doubtful significations"), are they brought to more simple concepts? Are they more easily understood?

      Or are they the same complex concept, only now without a name?

      Or perhaps the loss of name illustrates the complexity of the concept, where a name might lull us into confidence, into thinking we have a handle on the concept...

  11. Jan 2019
    1. The name Vatican city was first used in the Lateran Treaty, signed on 11 February 1929, which established the modern city-state. The name is taken from Vatican Hill, the geographic location of the state. "Vatican" is derived from the name of an Etruscan settlement, Vatica or Vaticum meaning garden, located in the general area the Romans called vaticanus ager, "Vatican territory".

      Named after "the" hill...

    1. “There are only three places that have a ‘the’ in the front of their name: the Vatican, The Hague, and the Bronx.” —Mary Higgins Clark
  12. Aug 2018
    1. “I thought it was a joke at first, to be contacted by someone named ‘Alastair Mactaggart,’ ” says Chris Jay Hoofnagle,

      This seems like the pot calling the kettle...

  13. Mar 2018
    1. Voyager record

      The voyager record represents us as humans, the purpose of this was to relate the message to someone who doesn't even live on Earth hence "aliens". This can also be compared to the aids project in which we are supposed to create a post so that someone who knows nothing about it can understand it based on the information you provide to them.

  14. Jun 2017
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  16. Sep 2016
    1. acceptable for parents to, say, name a girl Jack or a boy Lisa

      Swedes won't let you call you boy Sue.

    2. Activists are lobbying for parents to be able to choose any name for their children (there are currently just 170 legally recognized unisex names in Sweden).

      Sweden has only 170 legally recognised unisex names (i.e. the Swedes control the names you can give your kids).

  17. Dec 2014
  18. Jul 2014