25 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2019
    1. while questions like ‘Who gets to make decisions over the management and use of land? And who benefits from those uses?’ must be front and centre in the discussion on how land is used and its benefits distributed, the question of how we construct a normative idea of ‘public interest’ must also figure strongly.
    1. current microbiome profiling approaches such as metagenomic sequencing require homogenization of input material, which means that underlying spatial information is lost
  2. Jan 2019
    1. Most of the fine lines that separate mental entities from one another are drawn only in our own head and, therefore, totally in­visible. And yet, by playing up the act of "crossing" them, we can make mental discontinuities more "tangible." Many rituals, indeed, are designed specifically to substantiate the mental segmentation of reality into discrete chunks. In articulating our "passage" through the mental partitions separating these chunks from one another, such rituals, originally identified by Arnold Van Gennep as "rites of passage,"107 certainly enhance our experience of discontinuity.

      Rituals help connect the frame to the spatial qualities of the mental models we create to understand complex ideas.

    2. Such mental geography has no physical basis but we experience it as if it did

      Evokes Moser's cognitive mental models and Borditsky's spatial metaphor work on how we use the language of physical space to carve out understanding about self and the social/cultural concepts.

  3. Dec 2018
    1. In particular, concurrency control problems arise when the software, data,and interface are distributed over several computers. Time delays when ex-changing potentially conflicting actions are especially worrisome. ... Ifconcurrency control is not established, people may invoke conflicting ac-tions. As a result, the group may become confused because displays are incon-sistent, and the groupware document corrupted due to events being handledout of order. (p. 207)

      This passage helps to explain the emphasis in CSCW papers on time/duration as a system design concern for workflow coordination (milliseconds between MTurk hits) versus time/representation considerations for system design

    2. eople prefer to know who else is present in a shared space, and they usethis awareness to guide their work

      Awareness, disclosure, and privacy concerns are key cognitive/perception needs to integrate into technologies. Social media and CMCs struggle with this knife edge a lot.

      It's also seems to be a big factor in SBTF social coordination that leads to over-compensating and pluritemporal loading of interactions between volunteers.

  4. Nov 2018
    1. Learning a Map of Environment: The Role of Visuo-Spatial Abilities inYoung and Older Adults

      This study focused on the difference in visuo-spatial relations between younger adults and older adults. The purpose was tol determine the effect of aging on visuo-spatial relations.<br> Both groups performed the same tasks using a simplified map for orientation, pointing out locations, and recreating the map. The results indicated that older adults successfully completed the tasks at a lower rate and that males successfully completed tasks more that women. The researches highly recommended other duplicate the study to determine if the results can be generalized and consistent. This study is a valuable indication of the changing needs of adult learners due to aging. Rating: 8/10

  5. Aug 2018
    1. Viewed from a practice perspective, the distinction be­tween cyclic and linear time blurs because it depends on the observer's point of view and moment of observation. In particular cases, simply shifting the observer's vantage point (e.g., from the corporate suite to the factory floor) or changing the period of observation (e.g., from a week to a year) may make either the cyclic or the linear aspect of ongoing practices more salient.

      Could it be that SBTF volunteers are situating themselves in time as a way to respond to a cyclic/linear tension? or a spatial tension?

    1. Through spatio-temporalfiltering of messages we are able to observeevolution of topic signal that is consistent with rumor theory’s predictions. In the area immediately surrounding Moore wefind the strongest evidence that rumoring is an evolutionary process, as the topic and tone of messages shifts notably over thisthree-day span. Although these results may not necessarily generalize to all events, we dofind some initial support thatrumoring is a process marked by topical evolution over time. Once again, the spatio-temporalfiltering approach proves to berobust tool for measuring signal of hazard-related rumoring.

      Summary findings.

    2. Tobler’s First Law of Geography states that“Allthings are related, but nearby things are more related than distant things”(Tobler, 1970). Barring sudden, drastic changes tothe landscape, new information from a specific locale should be consistent with what we already know about that location aswell as what we know about nearby locations

      This is the first time I've seen this cited in crisis informatics research. Get this paper.

    1. The past leads to and influences the future, but the future does not influence the past.Thus El Sawy s research provided a second clue that past and future are re­lated, and it even added a causal direction (i.e., “A connection to the past fa­cilitates a connection to the future” [March 1999, p. 75])·

      Study demonstrates "time's arrow" that the past influences future but not the other way around.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arrow_of_time

      This idea also contributes to a spatial sense of time in Western cultures as "behind", "forward", "ahead", etc. Eastern and Global South cultures do not share this spatial representation.

  6. Jul 2018
    1. in a more polychronic culture, people would stand closer to each other while talking. So time and space are related in the social as well as the physical world.

      Could the relationship between polychronicity and physical proximity help to explain the use of situated and/or spatial language in globalized, virtual social coordination work?

      Note: National studies of polychronicity have been conducted through qualitative methods (observation and interviews)

    1. the potential capacity of exterrirorial beings to be everywhere at once and nowhere in particular is inescapably tied to operators that are bounded by their embodied temporal limits of terrestrial existence and sequential information processing. The actual capacity for parallel absorption of knowledge, therefore, is hugely disap­pointing. Equally, the electronic capacity to be now-here and no-where has brought the body to a standstill.

      Adam's critique of transmission technologies allowing people to be "now-here and no-where" perhaps also helps unpacks some of the tensions for SBTF's global social coordination.

      Could this be some of the unconscious motive to use terms that situate volunteers with one another as they attempt to grapple with tempo-imposed friction points which work against "terrestrial existence" and "sequential information processing"?

  7. Mar 2018
    1. In Europe, there is a strong current of thinking that future sites of waste repositories should somehow be integrated into human society so that the warnings are transmitted from generation to generation, sort of Keepers of the Sacred Fire.  Instead of creating facilities that are totally cut off from society, disposal facilities could be made part of the fabric of the community, integrating its existence safely into the future.

      In this section Conca is suggesting a almost cultural vibe of safety to pass from generation to generation. It's similar to traditional practices passed down to from generation to generation like cow-tow or meditation. This idea is leaning more towards a spatial modal representation of message. By creating a more closer proximity between people and the ideas of safety it will allow for a more universal sign that will last for generations.

  8. Oct 2017
    1. The information is organized in map form (the spatial mode),

      I find the use spatial modes to be extremely helpful when trying to comprehend things, especially data. If we go by the Theory of Multiple Intelligences, I might be considered a person who relies on their "spatial intelligence" frequently.

      For example, when analyzing historical events in a class, I appreciate having an accurate timeline that is spaced out to scale. This way I can put important time periods or the long lasting effects of an event in perspective. I believe that people can not appreciate the length of the dynastic rule in China until they see how long (for physical timelines "long" is in the literal sense) it was and how many well-known events of the Western world took place during its existence. Additionally, people seem to forget how long the planet Earth has existed until shown the tiny portion of its timeline that the entire course of human history occupies.

      Even just recently I remember using spatial modes of displaying information to help my research colleagues understand an issue. Since some data from a research paper we were referencing had data that was not consistently sampled, we could not accurately replicate their experiment to test their results and input data into deep learning programs. I decided to represent the data using spaced out visuals to explain my suggested method for predicting information within those data gaps.

  9. Jan 2017
  10. Nov 2016
    1. The participants with relatively strong spatial abilities tended to gravitate towards, and excel in, scientific and technical fields such as the physical sciences, engineering, mathematics, and computer science.
  11. Jan 2016
    1. Barbara Mundy, chapter 1 from Mapping New Spain: Indigenous Cartography and the Maps of the Relaciones Geográficas

      Mundy, B. "Spain and the Imperial Ideology of Mapping" in The Mapping of New Spain. Indigenous Cartography and the Maps of the Relaciones Geográficas. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press. 1996

      While Mundy’s approach to the production of maps in the Spanish empire centers on the figure of the king and his connection to territories near and far from him, she does so in order to exemplify the way man in 16th-century Europe positioned himself within the world. Through this view, for example, the maps serve as a way for Phillip II to legitimate his rule over the empire, especially in the New World territories.

      Mundy's research questions explore why different/varied methods of representation were important in the 16th-century European context (i.e. choreographic vs. geographic maps), and how these translated into understanding space in New World from an Old World perspective.

      In order to answer her main questions, she examines two mapping commissions ordered by Phillip II and carried out by Anton van den Wyngaerde and Pedro de Esquivel. She identifies the distinct methods of representation used by the artists taking into account the broader historical and geographical context that would eventually influence the way the territories in the New Spain would be represented, as happened with the creation of the Relaciones Geograficas in New Spain.

      Mundy effectively help us understand the significance of mapping (along with the different methodologies of doing so) from a conceptual as well as a methodological point of view. Her analysis, as well as contextualization of the van den Wyngaerde and Esquivel maps offers a glimpse onto the conceptual frame that informed Europe’s initial understanding of the New World as part of the greater whole that was the Spanish empire. However, as she stresses the importance of the tangible nature of the lands (at least through maps), her visual examples become limited as she only provides an example of Esquivel’s work. It would have been very useful to compare it to the work of van den Wyngaerde (the distinction between choreographic and geographic maps remained unclear without a visual aid).

      Mundy's contribution lies in prompting us to think about different ways of engaging with space, and what that engagement signifies within a given context (i.e. for Phillip II, engaging his New World possessions through visual representations of the maps legitimized his status as king given that he could not physically rule overseas, thus he still has control over this space).

      “In both kinds of maps [van den Wyngaerde’s and Esquivel’s], man defines his relation to the world through his ability to measure it” (Mundy, 4)

  12. Dec 2015
    1. All of that is to say that this essay is the outcome not only of the individuals who wrote it, but also of the places that we have inhabited throughout the process.

      Places as actants.

  13. Jan 2014
    1. but scientists' understanding of the emergent spatial dynamics at the population level has not kept pace, in large part due to an absence of appropriate tools for data handling and statistical analysis.

      Tools gap needs to be filled to improve understanding of emergent spatial dynamics.

    1. NSF Advances in Biological Informatics: "Informatics tools for population-level animal movements." with T. Mueller, P. Leimgruber, A. Royle, and J. Calabrese. Thomas Mueller, an Assistant Research Scientist in my lab, leads this project. Also on this grant, postdoc Chris Fleming is investigating theoretical aspects of animal foraging and statistical issues associated with empirical data on animal movements. This project is developing innovative data management and analysis tools that will allow scientists and conservation managers to use animal relocation and tracking data to study movement processes at the population-level, focusing on the interrelationship of multiple moving individuals. We are developing and testing these new tools using datasets on Mongolian gazelles, whooping cranes, and blacktip sharks. More information is available on the Movement Dynamics Homepage.
    1. My project seeks to develop computer models that simulate and link behavioral movement mechanisms which can be either based on memory, perceptual cues or triggered by environmental factors. It explores their efficiency under different scenarios of resource distributions across time and space. Finally it tries to integrate empirical data on resource distributions as well as movements of moving animals, such as satellite data on primary productivity and satellite tracking data of Mongolian gazelles.
    2. News Thomas Mueller and Bill Fagan receive a new NSF Bioinformatics grant Collaborators Peter Leimgruber Smithsonian Institution Volker Grimm Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Leipzig Kirk A. Olson University of Massachusetts Todd K. Fuller University of Massachusetts George B. Schaller Wildlife Conservation Society Nuria Selva Institute of Nature Conservation, Krakow

      Collaborators

      • Peter Leimgruber, Smithsonian Institution
      • Volker Grimm, Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ, Leipzig
      • Kirk A. Olson, University of Massachusetts
      • Todd K. Fuller, University of Massachusetts
      • George B. Schaller, Wildlife Conservation Society
      • Nuria Selva, Institute of Nature Conservation, Krakow