724 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Jun 2024
  3. May 2024
    1. They found that students were most satisfied when provided direct feedback from facultycompared to engaging in either discussion boards or peer review activities (

      direct personal feedback is important

    1. While I enjoyed an excellent classical music education in London at the Royal College of Music I ventured later intopop, rock and other musical styles without abandoning my classical roots, and attempted to share the fruits of this Catholic musical perspective with audiences. They were perhaps not ready for pioneering efforts in bridging the gap between jazz and classical, then, and seemed to me sometimes to advocate a kind of ‘apartheid in music'(Reddy 2005a).
  4. Apr 2024
    1. [Narrator]: The Cluttered Desk, Index Card,file folders, the in-out basket, the calculator.These are the tools of the office professional's past.Since the dawn of the computer age, better machines have always meant bigger and more powerful.But the software could not accommodate the needs of office professionals who are responsiblefor the look, shape and feel of tomorrow.

      In 1983, at the dawn of the personal computer age, Apple Inc. in promotional film entitled "Lisa Soul Of A New Machine" touted their new computer, a 16-bit dual disk drive "personal office system", as something that would do away with "the cluttered desk, index cards, file folders, the in-out basket, [and] the calculator." (00:01)

      Some of these things moved to the realm of the computer including the messy desk(top) now giving people two messy desks, a real one and a virtual one. The database-like structure of the card index also moved over, but the subjective index and its search power were substituted for a lower level concordance search.


      30 years on, for most people, the value of the database idea behind the humble "index card" has long since disappeared and so it seems here as if it's "just" another piece of cluttery paper.


      Appreciate the rosy framing of the juxtaposition of "past" and "future" jumping over the idea of the here and now which includes the thing they're selling, the Lisa computer. They're selling the idealized and unclear future even though it's really just today.

    1. One transaction at a time would generallynot lead either to much work or muchbusiness, and besides, a transaction cannot always be completedwhile you wait. The consequence is that we arrive at a num-ber of transactions going on simultaneously. When we nowreach the stage of too much work, then we must find waysand means to supplement our energy. Thus we arrive at amultitude of transactions by means of concerted action.

      While using different verbiage, Kaiser is talking about the idea of information overload here and providing the means to tame it by appropriately breaking it up into pieces upon which we might better apply our energies to turn it into something.

    1. History of the United States (1834)

      this example of an autocomplete of 1834 tagging is a spectacular and phenomenally useful example of combinatorial creativity with respect to poverty and historical research... of course, following it along with some useful outcome(s) would add additional power, but even the small suggestion here is spectacular.

      https://hypothes.is/a/Gt38VOpFEe6oqSPHU9gL7A

  5. Mar 2024
    1. To LODOVICO) Concerning this, sir—(To DESDEMONA) Oh,well-painted passion!(To LODOVICO) I am commanded home.(To DESDEMONA) Getyou away,I’ll send for you anon.(To LODOVICO) Sir, I obey themandateAnd will return to Venice.(To DESDEMONA) Hence,avaunt!

      Maybe this passage signifies the intertwining of politics and personal, and how they are inseperable, because human is inseperable to their emotions -- lest they be Iago?

    2. Either from Venice, or some unhatched practiceMade demonstrable here in Cyprus to him,Hath puddled his clear spirit, and in such casesMen’s natures wrangle with inferior things,Though great ones are their object.

      She thinks it must be something political that is upsetting him -- perhaps it shows that relationship between personal and political conflict, the transferrable nature? Or proving Iago's point that emotion sways the most?

    3. and for one to say a soldier lies,’tis stabbing

      Correlates occupation to personal life. He is speaking truth. But what is the Clown's relevance? Foreshadows that Cassio is truly honest

    4. And O you mortal engines, whose rude throatsThe immortal Jove’s dead clamors counterfeit,Farewell! Othello’s occupation’s gone

      Connects personal to political. How is his military role related to his personal love life?

    5. You have known him long, and be you well assuredHe shall in strangeness stand no farther offThan in a polite distance.

      Politics vs Feeling

    6. To manage private and domestic quarrel?In night, and on the court and guard of safety?'Tis monstrous. Iago, who began ’t?

      Personal and professional mix up looked down upon

    7. ake all the money thou canst. If sanctimonyand a frail vow betwixt an erring barbarian andsupersubtle Venetian be not too hard for my wits and allthe tribe of hell, thou shalt enjoy her.

      Showing that he believes his wills make him the God of the world, that he has ultimate power over the chessboard just through intention alone -- and that is the work of the devil, the rejection of emotion's sway on decision making, and pure reason

    8. Virtue? A fig! 'Tis in ourselves that we are thus orthus. Our bodies are our gardens, to the which our willsare gardeners

      Iago's main core lies in self-control and motivation -- he believes himself to be a man of simple free will, and unlimited freedom. Unrestrained and in control of the chessboard -- he assumes both the external world and (mistakenly) his internal world are under his control, but they may not be.

    9. Is of so flood-gate and o'erbearing natureThat it engluts and swallows other sorrowsAnd it is still itself.

      Exaggerated emotions in the form of water and nature -- what could this mean? ALSO, Shows the role of emotion in this political setting, which is a recurring motif of overlap in personal and political decisions that runs throughout. How do you make a good ruler, leader who does not impulsively use personal emotion to decide in political circumstances? Reminds me of Hitler

    10. We lacked your counsel and your help tonight.

      Humorous, as it shows the lack of Brabantio's care in the political field, he is incompetent -- only woke up from bed to address his daughter's married life.

      If he can't do political, can he do personal? And vice versa -- alienates him from the reader -> Alienates from his racist ideas.

    11. Valiant Othello

      Important because it contrasts all the other views of Othello -- but when he is a general, he is valiant. What does this signify about roles? About our split between personal and professional/political life?

    1. Daarbovenop nog een ander waardevol ding, waarvoor ik de woorden nog niet precies van vinden. Een vorm van bewustzijn over tijd en ruimte, en de loop der dingen in mijn leven daarin. Het klinkt vast vaag, maar dagelijks moeiteloos kunnen zien waar je vandaag de afgelopen 20 jaar mee bezig was doet iets met een mens, en op een goede manier.

      Dit doet me denken aan dat PKM kan functioneren als een persoonlijke geschiedenis van jezelf.

    1. The other budgeting tool is the Spending Plan. Most of it flows out of transactions you’ve imported and categorized. This tool takes your income after bills, subscriptions, transfers, and savings are deducted, and subtracts planned spending, which can be one-time purchases or monthly expenses that fluctuate, like groceries and gas.
    2. The app’s developers and early users found that people spend discretionary money differently each month, making it difficult to create a workable budget.

      budgeting = difficult

    3. Some apps, such as Credit Karma and  Credit Sesame, suggest users open a new savings account that's affiliated with the app (but usually run by a bank) to help them put money toward savings. Simplifi doesn't offer any affiliated bank accounts, but it will do the bookkeeping for you if you want to set and contribute to savings goals. 
    1. I found this strange too. I de-linked all the bills and subscriptions from the budget (spending plan) in Simplifi and added them to the planned expense section. After that, the budget is more Mint like for me.
    2. I tried Simplifi a little bit more and I agree: their budgeting feature does not make sense to me. They separate bills and subscriptions from the spending plan, making it impossible to see every planned expense against my projected income. It also doesn’t offer an easy way to cover overspending by transferring available money from other categories.
    3. It seems better now but I don't like how it you can't easily roll with the punches if you go over something. It's not as easy as taking from another category and applying the funds you can only increase the current category. So you don't really know how much you have to spend.
  6. www.monarchmoney.com www.monarchmoney.com
    1. Our diagrams and charts make it easy to see where every dollar of your hard-earned money is flowing, so you can track your spending patterns at a glance.
    2. Monarch uses AI to clean your transactions, and gets smarter over time. If you want more control, you can use transaction rules to predictably update merchant names, categories, tags, notes, and more to keep everything organized.
    1. The best place to keep sinking funds is often a high-yield savings account.
    2. If you’re saving for several different expenses, it’s worth checking with your financial institution to see if they offer savings accounts with customized buckets. This way, you only have one account to keep track of, but you’re still using the sinking fund strategy to save for specific future expenses.
    1. Prepare for those inevitable expenses. When you see those tires are wearing thin, start saving for new ones. If you know the house you just bought has an old roof, start saving for a new one. These aren’t emergencies yet, and if you start saving up now, they never will be!
    1. So with that in mind, the best option for sinking funds tends to be a high-yield savings account
    2. You can create a sinking fund for any financial goal or expense you have. These can be ongoing expenses that occur irregularly, like car insurance that you pay every six months or once a year, or a big one-time expense, like a wedding.
    3. Predictable expenses that you pay monthly, like your utilities, should remain part of your monthly budget.
    1. Then it automatically withdraws money you can safely save and deposits it in the Oportun account you specify—either the Oportun savings or retirement account. Funds from your Oportun accounts can be moved back to your linked account at any time.
    1. Another simple way is to set up automatic deposits from your checking account into your savings account. Set the deposits to occur on the same day each month (like the day after your paycheck hits the account). This way, you’ll be saving a fixed amount of money regularly without even giving yourself the chance to use it for something else.
  7. Feb 2024
    1. The GNR technologies do not divide clearly into commercial andmilitary uses; given their potential in the market, it’s hard to imaginepursuing them only in national laboratories. With their widespreadcommercial pursuit, enforcing relinquishment will require a verificationregime similar to that for biological weapons, but on an unprecedentedscale. This, inevitably, will raise tensions between our individual pri-vacy and desire for proprietary information, and the need for verifica-tion to protect us all. We will undoubtedly encounter strong resistanceto this loss of privacy and freedom of action.

      While Joy looks at the Biological and Chemical Weapons Conventions as well as nuclear nonproliferation ideas, the entirety of what he's looking at is also embedded in the idea of gun control in the United States as well. We could choose better, but we actively choose against our better interests.

      What role does toxic capitalism have in pushing us towards these antithetical goals? The gun industry and gun lobby have had tremendous interest on that front. Surely ChatGPT and other LLM and AI tools will begin pushing on the profitmaking levers shortly.

  8. Jan 2024
    1. if we had a choice what would we want to eat what brings us joy and my my strong belief

      for - William Li - personal philosophy - healthy food strategy - begin by asking about favorite foods

      personal philosophy - William Li - what food do you eat that already brings you joy? - find out which ones are healthy - show them it's not heavy lifting

    1. You have feelings and you need to show them. You have desires and preferences and you need to tell the truth about what they are from the start.

      i did didn't i? since the very start, but i felt maybe i was desiring too much, whats in a name after all?

    1. Chapters of Me

      This post is an introduction to the author's life as a single mom and her journey of self-discovery, highlighting her experiences, challenges, and passions. She also shares her reasons for joining the Hive community and her dedication to exploring and bringing happiness through her content.

    2. Chapters of Me
      • Who: Jolyn Barcibal, a 25-year-old single mom from Negros Occidental, Philippines.
      • What: Introduction to Jolyn's life story and her journey of self-discovery as a single mom.
      • Where: Negros Occidental, Philippines.
      • Why: Jolyn wants to share her experiences and dreams while connecting with others and enhancing her writing skills through Hive.
      • When: Jolyn became a single mom in 2019 and has since been balancing motherhood, education, and work
      • How: Jolyn shows determination, unwavering commitment, and resilience in overcoming challenges and building a better future for herself and her child. She finds happiness in reading, writing, playing video games, exploring new foods while traveling, and video editing. Jolyn's parents provide strong support for her journey, and she aims to promote Hive and bring happiness through her content.
    1. I have a financial advisor who came to me with an investment opportunity, not that I'm some big mucky muck, but I have a little bit of investments and it was investing in wind. And I read through the materials and I was, and I went to my advisor and I said, so am I actually investing in the productive growth and development of wind farms?
      • for: example - financial investor ignorance

      • speculative investing - example

        • Marjorie tells the story of her financial investor who was clueless about whether this investment she was advocating for was derivatives that invest nothing in production and development of wind technology, or not.
  9. Dec 2023
    1. 4. Cite Card Icon : Hat (something above you)Tag : 5th block Quotation, cooking recipe from book, web, tv, anything about someone else’s idea is classified into this class. Important here is distinguishing “your idea (Discovery Card)” and “someone else’s idea (Cite Card)”. Source of the information must be included in the Cite Card. A book, for example, author, year, page(s) are recorded for later use.

      https://www.flickr.com/photos/hawkexpress/189972899/in/album-72157594200490122/

      Despite being used primarily as a productivity tool the PoIC system also included some features of personal knowledge management with "discovery cards" and "citation cards". Discovery cards were things which contained one's own ideas while the citation cards were the ideas of others and included bibliographic information. Citation cards were tagged on the 5th block as an indicator within the system.

      Question: How was the information material managed? Was it separate from the date-based system? On first blush it would appear not, nor was there a subject index which would have made it more difficult for one to find data within the system.

    1. Figure 11 shows that the resolvers that account for 50% of theIPv6 ingress set have relatively close number of IPv4 and IPv6egress addresses; the left 50% resolvers have more IPv4 egress IPaddresses than IPv6 egress IP addresse

      Only Figure 12 shows that this is indeed the distribution (for 99%)

      Otherwise, I think that's only one possible distribution matching Figure 11. And still, like the author's mentioned analysis of Figure 9, under assumption of equal distribution.

    2. under the premise of resolverswith the same proportion

      "Under premise of equal distribution (of both groups: IPv4 and IPv6)" - Interesting wording and probably the only one you can make from an ECDF graph.

      Figure 10 actually conveniently shows that this conclusion (under the simplifying assumption) is false, as ~1% resolvers have >50% IPv6-to-IPv4 ratio (p99 = 0.5).

  10. Nov 2023
    1. However, the miniscule size of ‘facts’ did not neces-sarily reflect Deutsch’s adherence to any theory of information. Instead, it indicated hispersonal interest in distinctions of the smallest scale, vocalized by his motto ‘de minimiscurat historicus’, that history’s minutiae matter.

      Gotthard Deutsch didn't adhere to any particular theory of information when it came to the size of his notes. Instead Jason Lustig indicates that his perspective was influenced by his personal motto 'de minimis curat historicus' (history's minutiae matter), and as a result, he was interested in the smallest of distinctions of fact and evidence. ᔥ

    1. IMPORTANT EDIT: Amongst the important sources linked below, I forgot to include THIS one, which may be the most important for contributing to your understanding of the Zettelkasten concept

      HA! Apparently my work has been influential for someone. I love that he put it up top like this. 😂

      via https://zibaldone.substack.com/p/a-guide-to-zettelkasten-part-2-a

    1. The collection represents approximately 4,000 volumes, ephemera and pamphlets that made up the library in Hannah Arendt’s last apartment in New York City. Of particular significance are the 900+ volumes containing marginal notes or lining, endnotes or ephemera, as well as many volumes inscribed to her by Martin Heidegger, Gershom Scholem, W.H. Auden and Randall Jarrell, among others.
    1. En la biblioteca de Ian Gibson: “Lorca me salvó de la desesperación” | EL PAÍS

      2023-05-17

      5:26 minutos https://youtu.be/NpoHA38qoyE

      Ian Gibson (Dublin, Irlanda, 1939-) en su biblioteca personal en Lavapiés (Madrid, España) comenta cómo su amor por Lorca se convirtió en una vocación y pasión que le salvó la vida:

      "Te juro que me salvó de la desesperación. Mi hermano terminó sus días en una clínica y yo tengo la misma semilla plantada en mi persona. Me habría desesperado sin vocación. Cuando tienes vocación, puedes superar cosas depresivas y negativas, porque tienes ojos fijos en una meta. Yo no sé qué habría sido de mí sin Federico, si me atrevo a llamarlo así."

      Obras completas de todos sus poetas, en especial de Lorca.

      • El libro que comenzó todo:

      The Bull of Minos (1955) de Leonard Cottrell (1913-1974), sobre las excavaciones en Troya y Grecia. Gibson soñaba con ser arqueólogo.

      Gibson dice que repara que también hace arqueología: hay aventura e investigación en lo que hace.

      • Tres imprescindibles

      • Poesías completas (Aguilar Editor) de Ruben Darío (1967-1916) (profesor en Brooklyn sobre Darío).

      Azul... (1988) de Darío (romance primaveral... nicaragüense, primaveral...).

      1. Romancero gitano (1928) de Lorca (1898-1936).

      A pesar de su español "muy defectuoso", el francés y los cognados fueron de ayuda.

      Romance de la pena negra.

      Romance sonámbulo.

      Magia en Lorca. Investigación. Hacer tesis sobre Lorca y "su mundo telúrico".

      1. Ulises (1920) de James Joyce (1882-1941). Ya lo leyó siete veces.

      Gibson dice que Finnegans Wake es más difícil que Ulises, y que Luis de Góngora (su poema "Soledades") también es difícil y que hay que estudiarlo.

      Descubriendo a Joyce más que antes. Lorca cuarenta años y ahora con Joyce...

      • Libro que nunca prestaría

      A Handbook for Travellers in Spain (Manual para viajeros por España y lectores en casa) (1845) de Richard Ford (1796-1858).

      Viajeros románticos, británicos... Inspiración grande para Gibson.

    1. It might be not obvious for most of you, but behind the scenes I'm neurodivegent, specifically #ActuallyAutistic2 3, so I'm mostly in limited availability, not only for my mental health.

      TODO Update FAQ

    1. in every case suggesting the failure of o cially sanctioned structures to requite loss, restore order, address human feeling, and commemorate the dead.

      he challenges the state by showing his own personal emotion rather than ritual in grieving for his mum

    2. He de ed the absolute moral clarity of o cial narratives, absorbing the rhetoric of virtue into an account that privileged loss and emotion
    3. It explained how her life had ended, virtuously, and it enabled her family to include her in their application for state honors along with the other relatives who died in 1861
    4. uthenticity of his grief through references to tears, physical pain, wailing, and other uncontrolled responses, which contrast neatly with hierarchical and orderly commemorative arrangements within established ritual settings.
  11. Oct 2023
    1. Acknowledgement: Great thanks to Chris Aldrich who saw the Quote Investigator article about the saying “We shape our tools, and thereafter our tools shape us”. Aldrich notified QI of the germane quotation examined in this new article. Aldrich pointed to its presence in “Walden”. This led QI to create this article and to update the existing article.

      https://quoteinvestigator.com/2023/10/21/tools-of-tools/

      I'm responsible for a quote investigator article being rewritten! Huzzah!

      Cross reference my note: https://boffosocko.com/2023/05/22/men-have-become-the-tools-of-their-tools-henry-david-thoreau/

    1. Television, radio, and all the sources of amusement andinformation that surround us in our daily lives are also artificialprops. They can give us the impression that our minds are active, because we are required to react to stimuli from outside.But the power of those external stimuli to keep us going islimited. They are like drugs. We grow used to them, and wecontinuously need more and more of them. Eventually, theyhave little or no effect. Then, if we lack resources within ourselves, we cease to grow intellectually, morally, and spiritually.And when we cease to grow, we begin to die.

      One could argue that Adler and Van Doren would lump social media into the sources of amusement category.

  12. Sep 2023
    1. Well one obvious drawback is that zettelkästen is not a knowledge management system.

      reply to u/glugolly at https://www.reddit.com/r/Zettelkasten/comments/16njtfx/comment/k1fn8w4/?utm_source=reddit&utm_medium=web2x&context=3 and

      Well, Zettelkasten is not a knowledge management system. [...] Update: I mean digital ZK. Shoe-box ZK is a combination of knowledge management system of that time and "thought system" of Niklas Luhmann. u/Aponogetone at https://www.reddit.com/r/Zettelkasten/comments/16njtfx/comment/k1f23nj/?utm_source=reddit&utm_medium=web2x&context=3

      I'm curious to see some evidence for why both you and u/Aponogetone say that a slip box (analog, digital or otherwise) is not a knowledge management system? Perhaps you don't think of it that way or use it solely to that end, but I find it difficult to see in light of the way I use mine and others have in the past. I suspect that if I had access to either of yours I could use it as a knowledge management system and it would tell me a lot about your interests and what you know and with a bit of work I could continue using it as one.

      Even an argument against the more encompassing group nature versus personal or individual knowledge management systems is blunted by the use of a Zettelkasten by Adler, Hutchins, et al. to create the Syntopicon, the group uses by the Mundaneum effort (which went to great lengths to standardize information to be findable), the Oxford English Dictionary compilation, Thesaurus Linguae Latinae (TLL), Wörterbuch der ägyptischen Sprache, or even the academics who still use photocopies or microfilm versions of S.D. Goitein's zettelkasten.

      What are the rest of us missing in your argument?

    1. In terms of evolution, animals adapt to their ecological conditions, but as humans, we have been able to control our ecological conditions.
      • for: humans vs other animals, personal experience, personal experience - pets, control vs adaptation, human features, quote, quote - Ruth Gates, quote - humans vs animals, quote - control vs adaptation
      • quote
        • . In terms of evolution, animals adapt to their ecological conditions, but as humans, we have been able to control our ecological conditions.
      • author: Ruth Gates
      • source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZJV0Kx7oGxU&t=496s
      • comment
        • personal experience
          • her remark made me think about how often I feel this difference with our pets. They adapt to whatever we do. We control our environment by building something. They just adapt to whatever we build.
            • Our pets never build anything, but simply adapt to what we build.
  13. Aug 2023
    1. BookmarkTypes and uses of PKM

      Almost every well known writer/composer/creative throughout history had some sort of note taking or knowledge system of one sort or another (florilegium, commonplace books, notebooks, diaries, journals, zettelkasten, waste books, mnemonic techniques, etc.), which would put them into your "active" category. I think you'd be hard put to come up with evidence of a "sudden" emergence of an "active" PKM system beyond the choice of individual users to actively do something with their collections or not.

      If you want to go more distant than Eminem, try looking closely at Ramon Llull's practice in the 11th century, or Homer in the c. 8th century BCE. Or to go much, much farther back, there's solid evidence that indigenous peoples in Australia had what you call both passive and active PKM systems as far back as 65,000 years ago. These are still in use today. Naturally these were not written, but used what anthropologists call orality. (See Walter Ong, Milman Parry, Lynne Kelly, Margo Neale, Duane Hamacher, et al.)

  14. Jul 2023
    1. The movement might be gaining steam now, but its roots date back to 1998, when Mark Bernstein introduced the idea of the “hypertext garden,” arguing for spaces on the internet that let a person wade into the unknown. “Gardens … lie between farmland and wilderness,” he wrote. “The garden is farmland that delights the senses, designed for delight rather than commodity.” (His digital garden includes a recent review of a Bay Area carbonara dish and reflections on his favorite essays.) The new wave of digital gardens discuss books and movies, with introspective journal entries; others offer thoughts on philosophy and politics. Some are works of art in themselves, visual masterpieces that invite the viewer to explore; others are simpler and more utilitarian, using Google Docs or Wordpress templates to share intensely personal lists. Avid readers in particular have embraced the concept, sharing creative, beautiful digital bookshelves that illustrate their reading journey. Nerding hard on digital gardens, personal wikis, and experimental knowledge systems with @_jonesian today.
    1. "I keep a dated diary of sorts on index cards, though they rarely go past one card a day."This is something I haven't heard of before. So, you journal/diary on index cards, one per day?

      reply to u/taurusnoises (Bob Doto) at tk

      Yep, for almost a full year now on 4x6" index cards. (Receipts for the kids: https://boffosocko.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/07/wp-1688411021709-scaled.jpg)

      Previously I'd used a Hobonichi Cousin (page per day) journal for this. (Perhaps I should have stayed with the A6 size instead of the larger A5 for consistency?) Decades ago (around 1988ish?) I had started using a 2 page per day DayTimer pocket planners (essentially pre-printed/timed index cards spiral bound into monthly booklets which they actually shipped in index card-like plastic boxes for storage/archival purposes). Technically I've been doing a version of this for a really long time in one form or another.

      It generally includes a schedule, to do lists (bullet journal style), and various fleeting notes/journaling similar to the older Memindex format, just done on larger cards for extra space. I generally either fold them in half for pocket storage for the day or carry about in groups for the coming week(s) when I'm away from my desk for extended periods (also with custom blank index card notebooks/pads).

      I won't go into the fact that in the 90's I had a 5,000+ person rolodex... or an index card (in the entertainment they called them buck slips) with the phone numbers and names of \~100 people I dealt with regularly when early brick cell phones didn't have great (or any) storage/functionality.

  15. Jun 2023
    1. BookmarkNew book - Personal Knowledge Graphs, by Ivo Velitchkov

      https://forum.zettelkasten.de/discussion/2597/new-book-personal-knowledge-graphs-by-ivo-velitchkov#latest

      For some additional context the work can be found through https://personalknowledgegraphs.com/#/page/pkg. It also has portions of the building of the book which exist as a knowledge graph, though it doesn't appear that they put up the entirety of the book as a linked knowledge graph the way they had initially planned. I've read a few parts in draft form, including Flancian's chapter whose ideas are tremendous, but I have yet to read the remainder of the published work.

      [Disclosure: I had submitted and had been accepted to write an early, historical-flavored chapter for this volume, but ultimately fell out, as did many others, over disagreements regarding their editing and/or publishing process. I'm close with Flancian and appreciate his experimental programming work on https://anagora.org/index, which one might call a multi-layered wiki of personal wikis, commonplace books, zettelkasten, diaries, notes, and other similar forms of personal knowledge. If you've got a public, digitally available version of a zettelkasten you'd like to add to his project, do reach out to him to interconnect it with the Agora and others' work there.]

    1. Instead, Rivers is donating the extensive collection to the National Comedy Center, the high-tech museum in Jamestown, N.Y., joining the archives of A-list comics like George Carlin and Carl Reiner. The fact that the jokes will be accessible is only one of the reasons for Melissa Rivers’s decision.

      To avoid the Raiders of the Lost Ark problem, Melissa Rivers donated her mother's joke collection to the National Comedy Center so it would be on display and accessible. The New York-based museum is also home to the archives of George Carlin and Carl Reiner.

    2. Take a look at some of the artifacts from her archive, which includes 65,000 cross-referenced gags and is headed to the National Comedy Center.

      Joan Rivers' card catalog of ~65,000 cross referenced jokes will be housed at the National Comedy Center, a museum in Jamestown, NY.

    1. I’ve also found that Tailwind works extremely well as an extension of my memory. I’ve uploaded my “spark file” of personal notes that date back almost twenty years, and using that as a source, I can ask remarkably open-ended questions—“did I ever write anything about 19th-century urban planning” or “what was the deal with that story about Houdini and Conan Doyle?”—and Tailwind will give me a cogent summary weaving together information from multiple notes. And it’s all accompanied by citations if I want to refer to the original direct quotes for whatever reason.

      This sounds like the sort of personalized AI tool I've been wishing for since the early ChatGPT models if not from even earlier dreams that predate that....

  16. May 2023
    1. Stephen Davies, Javier Velez-Morales, & Roger King (2005), "Building the memex sixty years later: trends and directions in personal knowledge bases", Department of Computer Science, University of Colorado at Boulder. The Wikipedia article on personal knowledge bases (PKBs) is basically a summary of the technical report. The report defined personal knowledge base systems, described their benefits, reviewed relevant fields of research, and compared systems in terms of several aspects of their data models: structural framework, knowledge elements, schema, and the role of transclusion. This report is the most comprehensive publication I've read that compares PKB systems according to their key features.
    1. the Carthusian monks decided in 2019 to limit Chartreuse production to 1.6 million bottles per year, citing the environmental impacts of production, and the monks' desire to focus on solitude and prayer.[10] The combination of fixed production and increased demand has resulted in shortages of Chartreuse across the world.

      In 2019, Carthusian monks went back to their values and decided to scale back their production of Chartreuse.

    1. jdm @chrisaldrich Definitely inspired by your blogging.

      reply to @jdm at https://micro.blog/jdm/19064665

      Thanks! If you want sneak peaks of upcoming pieces, you might try subscribing to my "other" microblog: https://hypothes.is/users/chrisaldrich

    1. Writing permanent notes was time consuming as f***.

      The framing of "permanent notes" or "evergreen notes" has probably hurt a large portion of the personal knowledge management space. Too many people are approaching these as some sort of gold standard without understanding their goal or purpose. Why are you writing such permanent/evergreen notes? Unless you have an active goal to reuse a particular note for a specific purpose, you're probably wasting your time. The work you put into the permanent note is to solidify an idea which you firmly intend to reuse again in one or more contexts. The whole point of "evergreen" as an idea is that it can actively be reused multiple times in multiple places. If you've spent time refining it to the nth degree and writing it well, then you had better be doing so to reuse it.

      Of course many writers will end up (or should end up) properly contextualizing individual ideas and example directly into their finished writing. As a result, one's notes can certainly be rough and ready and don't need to be highly polished because the raw idea will be encapsulated somewhere else and then refined and rewritten directly into that context.

      Certainly there's some benefit for refining and shaping ideas down to individual atomic cores so that they might be used and reused in combination with other ideas, but I get the impression that some think that their notes need to be highly polished gems. Even worse, they feel that every note should be this way. This is a dreadful perspective.

      For context I may make 40 - 60 highlights and annotations on an average day of reading. Of these, I'll review most and refine or combine a few into better rougher shape. Of this group maybe 3 - 6 will be interesting enough to turn into permanent/evergreen notes of some sort that might be reused. And even at this probably only one is interesting enough to be placed permanently into my zettelkasten. This one will likely be an aggregation of many smaller ideas combined with other pre-existing ideas in my collection; my goal is to have the most interesting and unique of my own ideas in my permanent collection. The other 2 or 3 may still be useful later when I get to the creation/writing stage when I'll primarily focus on my own ideas, but I'll use those other rougher notes and the writing in them to help frame and recontextualize the bigger ideas so that the reader will be in a better place to understand my idea, where it comes from, and why it might be something they should find interesting.

      Thus some of my notes made while learning can be reused in my own ultimate work to help others learn and understand my more permanent/evergreen notes.

      If you think that every note you're making should be highly polished, refined, and heavily linked, then you're definitely doing this wrong. Hopefully a few days of attempting this will disabuse you of the notion and you'll slow down to figure out what's really worth keeping and maintaining. You can always refer back to rough notes if you need to later, but polishing turds is often thankless work. Sadly too many misread or misunderstand articles and books on the general theory of note taking and overshoot the mark thinking that the theory needs to be applied to every note. It does not.

      If you find that you're tiring of making notes and not getting anything out of the process, it's almost an assured sign that you're doing something wrong. Are you collecting thousands of ideas (bookmarking behavior) and not doing anything with them? Are you refining and linking low level ideas of easy understanding and little value? Take a step back and focus on the important and the new. What are you trying to do? What are you trying to create?

  17. Apr 2023
    1. To buy or not to buy a course? And, if the latter, which one? .t3_12fowjy._2FCtq-QzlfuN-SwVMUZMM3 { --postTitle-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; --postTitleLink-VisitedLinkColor: #9b9b9b; --postBodyLink-VisitedLinkColor: #989898; } questionSo, I've been considering buying an online course for Zettelkasten (in Obsidian). Thing is... There are a bunch of them. Two (maybe three) questions:Is it worth it? Has anyone gone down that path and care to share their experience?Any recommendations? I've seen a bunch of options and really don't have any hints on how to evaluate them.

      reply to u/Accomplished-Tip-597 at https://www.reddit.com/r/Zettelkasten/comments/12fowjy/to_buy_or_not_to_buy_a_course_and_if_the_latter/

      Which "industry", though? Productivity? Personal Knowledge Management? Neither of these are focused on the idea of a Luhmann-esque specific zettelkastenare they?

      For the original poster, what is your goal in taking a course? What do you want to get out of it? What are you going to use such a system for? The advice you're looking for will hinge on these.

      Everyone's use is going to be reasonably idiosyncratic, so not knowing anything else, my general recommendation (to minimize time, effort, and expense) would be to read one of the following (for free), practice at some of it for a few weeks before you do anything else. Then if you need it, talk u/taurusnoises into a few consultations based on what you'd like to accomplish. He's one of the few who does this who's got experience in the widest variety of traditions in addition to expertise in the platform you want (though I'd still recommend him if you were using something else.)

  18. Mar 2023
    1. In the fall of 2015, she assigned students to write chapter introductions and translate some texts into modern English.

      continuing from https://hypothes.is/a/ddn4qs8mEe2gkq_1T7i3_Q

      Potential assignments:

      Students could be tasked with finding new material or working off of a pre-existing list.

      They could individually be responsible for indexing each individual sub-text within a corpus by: - providing a full bibliography; - identifying free areas of access for various versions (websites, Archive.org, Gutenberg, other OER corpora, etc.); Which is best, why? If not already digitized, then find a copy and create a digital version for inclusion into an appropriate repository. - summarizing the source in general and providing links to how it fits into the broader potential corpus for the class. - tagging it with relevant taxonomies to make it more easily searchable/selectable within its area of study - editing a definitive version of the text or providing better (digital/sharable) versions for archiving into OER repositories, Project Gutenberg, Archive.org, https://standardebooks.org/, etc. - identifying interesting/appropriate tangential texts which either support/refute their current text - annotating their specific text and providing links and cross references to other related texts either within their classes' choices or exterior to them for potential future uses by both students and teachers.

      Some of this is already with DeRosa's framework, but emphasis could be on building additional runway and framing for helping professors and students to do this sort of work in the future. How might we create repositories that allow one a smörgåsbord of indexed data to relatively easily/quickly allow a classroom to pick and choose texts to make up their textbook in a first meeting and be able to modify it as they go? Or perhaps a teacher could create an outline of topics to cover along with a handful of required ones and then allow students to pick and choose from options in between along the way. This might also help students have options within a course to make the class more interesting and relevant to their own interests, lives, and futures.

      Don't allow students to just "build their own major", but allow them to build their own textbooks and syllabi with some appropriate and reasonable scaffolding.

    1. 27 Notizhefte mit 3240 Seiten, dicht gefüllt mit hieroglyphischen Abschriften, der Ernte der ägyptischen Arbeit Kurt Sethes, bilden den wertvollsten Kern des Abschriftenarchivs am Altägyptischen Wörterbuch, das im ganzen immerhin 201 Hefte unterschiedlicher Stärke umfaßt.

      Out of a total of 201 notebooks, Kurt Sethe's work on the Wörterbuch der ägyptischen Sprache comprised 27 notebooks with 3240 pages of notes on hieroglyphic copies from his travels and research.

    1. By looking at practices of note-taking for their ownsake we can get a better idea of how people performed intellectual work in the past, what caughttheir attention and how they moved from reading to producing a finished work, often via note-taking.
    2. In literature genetic criticism studies the development of a work from reading notesand drafts; this approach is most feasible after the mid-19th century, once national librariesstarted amassing the working papers of authors, either by bequest or by purchase.5

      National libraries began to more commonly acquire the working papers (nachlass) of authors and researchers after the mid-19th century.

    1. Other PKM forums, places to discuss?

      reply to u/deafpolygon at https://www.reddit.com/r/PKMS/comments/121ihrj/other_pkm_forums_places_to_discuss/

      The space is fragmented broadly by both tools (some with specific workflows) and philosophies, so you may have to hunt/peck (or subscribe/filter) for the types of pieces you're searching for. Here's some resources you might appreciate. In the fora section things are ordered roughly by relation to the topic as well as frequency of posting/activity.

      Fora

      Sites

      Discord

      For some communities like Obsidian, Logseq, etc. you're also likely to find discord servers with some reasonable sub-channels and activity as well. A good non-product specific Discord with related material is The Productivists at https://discord.gg/m2bP2hh3. There's also one for Zettelkasten https://discord.gg/bYrVm9sr.

      And of course as you visit all these locales, be sure to mention r/PKMS and maybe more will learn that this location is a better catch-all for in-depth conversations and questions.

    1. In Memoriam: Josef Körner (9 May 1950) Robert L. Kahn The Modern Language Review, Vol. 58, No. 1 (Jan., 1963), pp. 38-59 https://www.jstor.org/stable/3720394

      ...of German letters long before Heine, impudently naive and imprudently honest, though always in- dustrious, 'griindlich' (and was it not Korner who 'discovered' the numerous un- published notebooks of Friedrich Schlegel and, in turn, left behind some twenty ' Zettelkasten ' which were recently acquired by Bonn University, a unique 'Fund-...

      example of use of zettelkasten in English here in 1963 specifically as a loan word from German...

    1. Chucks has exceeded with all Director-level core competencies in more ways than I could possibly enumerate...

      Can we keep track of dynamic content?

    1. "Personal Knowledge Management Is Bullshit"

      reply to jameslongley at https://forum.zettelkasten.de/discussion/2532/personal-knowledge-management-is-bullshit

      I find that these sorts of articles against the variety of practices have one thing in common: the writer fails to state a solid and realistic reason for why they got into it in the first place. They either have no reason "why" or, perhaps, just as often have all-the-reasons "why", which may be worse. Much of this is bound up in the sort of signaling and consumption which @Sascha outlines in point C (above).

      Perhaps of interest, there are a large number of Hypothes.is annotations on that original article written by a variety of sense-makers with whom I am familiar. See: https://via.hypothes.is/https://www.otherlife.co/pkm/ Of note, many come from various note making traditions including: commonplace books, bloggers, writers, wiki creators, zettelkasten, digital gardening, writers, thinkers, etc., so they give a broader and relatively diverse perspective. If I were pressed to say what most of them have in common philosophically, I'd say it was ownership of their thought.

      Perhaps it's just a point of anecdotal evidence, but I've been noticing that who write about or use the phrase "personal knowledge management" are ones who come at the space without an actual practice or point of view on what they're doing and why—they are either (trying to be) influencers or influencees.

      Fortunately it is entirely possible to "fake it until you make it" here, but it helps to have an idea of what you're trying to make.