1,032 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. FluentFelicityOp · 12hBrilliant... I must ask you to share a little of your story. What brought you to have learned this much history and philosophy?

      I've always had history and philosophy around me from a relatively young age. Some of this stems from a practice of mnemonics since I was eleven and a more targeted study of the history and philosophy of mnemonics over the past decade. Some of this overlaps areas like knowledge acquisition and commonplace books which I've delved into over the past 6 years. I have a personal website that serves to some extent as a digital commonplace book and I've begun studying and collecting examples of others who practice similar patterns (see: https://indieweb.org/commonplace_book and a selection of public posts at https://boffosocko.com/tag/commonplace-books/) in the blogosphere and wiki space. As a result of this I've been watching the digital gardens space and the ideas relating to Zettelkasten for the past several years as well. If you'd like to go down a similar rabbit hole I can recommend some good books.

    1. The goal of Quartz is to make hosting your own public digital garden free and simple. You don’t even need your own website. Quartz does all of that for you and gives your own little corner of the internet. https://github.com/jackyzha0/quartz

      Quartz runs on top of Hugo so all notes are written in Markdown .

    1. There's apparently a product that will turn one's Roam Research notes into a digital garden.

      Great to see a bridge for making these things easier for the masses, but I have to think that there's a better and cheaper way. Perhaps some addition competition in the space will help bring the price down.

  2. Jul 2021
    1. An example of a digital garden.

      One of the missing pieces for many of these is a starting point for entry. Notice that in this example he has a link to his Junk Food article to get people started.

      Tables of contents can be a useful or important UI feature that is sometimes missing in these.

    1. There is no pressure to publish a perfect post in digital gardens as notes grow over time just like plants in a garden.

      There is no "theoretical pressure", however it still exists. The goal is to minimize it, to move beyond it.

    2. Publication Dates are not important to Digital Gardeners. Posts are connected via references or common themes.

      I would argue against this. Many digital gardeners use publication dates and even last updated dates on their posts. Time in particular can be an incredibly important datum with regard to providing useful context to one's content.

    1. The world could benefit from a curated set of bookmarklets in the style of Smalltalk ("doIt", "printIt", etc buttons) that you can place in your bookmarks bar (or copy into a bookmarks document and open in it in your browser), where the purpose would be to allow you to:

      1. access a new scratch area (about:blank) for experimentation
      2. make it editable, or make any given element on a page editable
      3. let you evaluate any code written into the scratch space

      scratch.js aims for something something similar, and though laudable it falls short of what I actually crave (and what I imagine would be be most beneficial/appreciated by the public).

    1. The point of a pluralistic society, however, isn’t to find a single, absolute, dogmatic ideal. It is rather to discover ways of coexisting productively, despite and perhaps even in celebration of our differences.

      Very good point. Should look for plurality in ideals.

    1. Taking my own advice, this document was written in the world’s greatestweb authoring tool: LibreOffice Writer.

      Great. This is something that I advocate for technical people to put forth as a "serious" solution more often than I see today (which is essentially never). But next time, save it as HTML. (And ditch the stylistic "rubbish"; don't abuse "the sanctity of the written word by coercing it to serve the vanity of a graphic artist incapable of discharging his duty as a mere lieutenant".)

    2. There used to be an internet middle class, of non-commercial users whowere not overtly technical, but were still able to self-publish.

      This is probably the least flawed claim in the entire piece.

    1. Which makes them similar to “commonplace”: reusable in many places. But this connotation has led to a pejorative flavor of the German translation “Gemeinplatz” which means platitude. That’s why I prefer to call them ‘evergreen’ notes, although I am not sure if I am using this differentiation correctly.

      I've only run across the German "Gemeinplatz" a few times with this translation attached. Sad to think that this negative connotation has apparently taken hold. Even in English the word commonplace can have a somewhat negative connotation as well meaning "everyday, ordinary, unexceptional" when the point of commonplacing notes is specifically because they are surprising or extraordinary by definition.

      Your phrasing of "evergreen notes" seems close enough. I've seen some who might call the shorter notes you're making either "seedlings" or "budding" notes. Some may wait for bigger expansions of their ideas into 500-2000 word essays before they consider them "evergreen" notes. (Compare: https://maggieappleton.com/garden-history and https://notes.andymatuschak.org/Evergreen_notes). Of course this does vary quite a bit from person to person in my experience, so your phrasing certainly fits.

      I've not seen it crop up in the digital gardens or zettelkasten circles specifically but the word "evergreen" is used in the journalism space) to describe a fully formed article that can be re-used wholesale on a recurring basis. Usually they're related to recurring festivals, holidays, or cyclical stories like "How to cook the perfect Turkey" which might get recycled a week before Thanksgiving every year.

    1. You can use LibreOffice's Draw

      Nevermind LibreOffice Draw, you can use LibreOffice Writer to author the actual content. That this is never seriously pushed as an option (even, to my knowledge, by the LibreOffice folks themselves) is an indictment of the computing industry.

      Having said that, I guess there is some need to curate a set of templates for small and medium size businesses who want their stuff to "pop".

    1. Is it useful to the person writing to know that what’s written may be readable by others and that spurs deeper thought in reflection – or is that more blog-like than note-like?

      I often find that doing the work in public ups the quality and effort I put into the thing because I know there's at least the off-hand chance that someone else might read it.

      Generally this means a better contextualized product for myself when I come back to revisit it later, even if no one else saw it. Without it, sometimes my personal scribbles don't hold up when I revisit them, and I can't tell what I had originally intended because I didn't flesh out the idea enough.

    1. Revisiting this essay to review it in the framing of digital gardens.

      In a "gardens and streams" version of this metaphor, the stream is flow and the garden is stock.

      This also fits into a knowledge capture, growth, and innovation framing. The stream are small atomic ideas flowing by which may create new atomic ideas. These then need to be collected (in a garden) where they can be nurtured and grow into new things.

      Clippings of these new growth can be placed back into the stream to move on to other gardeners. Clever gardeners will also occasionally browse through the gardens of others to see bigger picture versions of how their gardens might become.

      Proper commonplacing is about both stock and flow. The unwritten rule is that one needs to link together ideas and expand them in places either within the commonplace or external to it: essays, papers, articles, books, or other larger structures which then become stock for others.

      While some creators appear to be about all stock in the modern era, it's just not true. They're consuming streams (flow) from other (perhaps richer) sources (like articles, books, television rather than social media) and building up their own stock in more private (or at least not public) places. Then they release that article, book, film, television show which becomes content stream for others.

      While we can choose to create public streams, but spending our time in other less information dense steams is less useful. Better is to keep a reasonably curated stream to see which other gardens to go visit.

      Currently is the online media space we have structures like microblogs and blogs (and most social media in general) which are reasonably good at creating streams (flow) and blogs, static sites, and wikis which are good for creating gardens (stock).

      What we're missing is a structure with the appropriate and attendant UI that can help us create both a garden and a stream simultaneously. It would be nice to have a wiki with a steam-like feed out for the smaller attendant ideas, but still allow the evolutionary building of bigger structures, which could also be placed into the stream at occasional times.

      I can imagine something like a MediaWiki with UI for placing small note-like ideas into other streams like Twitter, but which supports Webmention so that ideas that come back from Twitter or other consumers of one's stream can be placed into one's garden. Perhaps in a Zettelkasten like way, one could collect atomic notes into their wiki and then transclude those ideas into larger paragraphs and essays within the same wiki on other pages which might then become articles, books, videos, audio, etc.

      Obsidian, Roam Research do a somewhat reasonable job on the private side and have some facility for collecting data, but have no UI for sharing out into streams.

    1. In another talk, one in which he also spoke of control and surrender, he developed another contrast, between creativity-as-architecture and creativity-as-gardening:
    2. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Alan Jacobs</span> in the blog garden – Snakes and Ladders (<time class='dt-published'>07/01/2021 09:15:23</time>)</cite></small>

    3. Alan Jacobs seems to be delving into the area of thought spaces provided by blogs and blogging.

      In my view, they come out of a cultural tradition of commonplace books becoming digital and more social in the the modern era. Jacobs is obviously aware of the idea of Zettelkasten, but possibly hasn't come across the Sonke Ahrens' book on smart notes or the conceptualization of the "digital garden" stemming from Mike Caulfield's work.

      He's also acquainted with Robin Sloane, though it's unclear if he's aware of the idea of Stock and Flow.

    4. So after much reflection, I have decided that the way to get there is by planting a new bed in my blog garden.

      A mixture of a blog and a digital garden?

    1. And essentially the idea there is that one is making a kind of music in the way that one might make a garden.  One is carefully constructing seeds, or finding seeds, carefully planting them and then letting them have their life.  And that life isn't necessarily exactly what you'd envisaged for them.  It's characteristic of the kind of work that I do that I'm really not aware of how the final result is going to look or sound.  So in fact, I'm deliberately constructing systems that will put me in the same position as any other member of the audience.  I want to be surprised by it as well.  And indeed, I often am. What this means, really, is a rethinking of one's own position as a creator.  You stop thinking of yourself as me, the controller, you the audience, and you start thinking of all of us as the audience, all of us as people enjoying the garden together.  Gardener included.  So there's something in the notes to this thing that says something about the difference between order and disorder.  It's in the preface to the little catalog we have.  Which I take issue with, actually, because I think it isn't the difference between order and disorder, it's the difference between one understanding of order and how it comes into being, and a newer understanding of how order comes into being.
    2. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Alan Jacobs</span> in control and surrender, architecture and gardening – Snakes and Ladders (<time class='dt-published'>07/01/2021 09:49:29</time>)</cite></small>

  3. Jun 2021
    1. Some of the best customers of such a service will be academics.

      Indeed. Web literacy among the masses is pitifully low. Browsermakers are certainly to blame for being poor stewards. Hot Valley startups are responsible as well. (See https://quoteinvestigator.com/2017/11/30/salary/.)

    1. I've run into Phil Jones in the digital gardens telegram group, but not looked very closely at [[Cardigan Bay]] before.

      Based on the idea of teh [[Smallest Federated Wiki]], Cardigan Bay is a wiki engine in Clojure which can be found on GitHub at interstar/cardigan-bay.

      Be sure to invite Jones to [[Gardens and Streams II]].

    1. Slides from

      Panel: Digital Literacies

      How do the collaborative and multimodal qualities of social annotation encourage digital literacies? Join an expert panel of educators and researchers as they share their projects and perspectives, as well as discuss how social annotation exemplifies creative and interactive digital literacies. The panel will be moderated by Mary Klann (History, UC San Diego/San Diego Miramar College) and features speakers Jenae Cohn (Academic Technology, CSU Sacramento), Cherise McBride (Education, UC Berkeley), and Paul Schacht (English/Digital Learning, SUNY Geneseo).

    1. The other way to lessen the impact of blockchains is to ensure that the energy used is completely renewable. On April 7, a coalition led by Energy Web announced the Crypto Climate Accord, modeled loosely on the Paris Agreement. The top-level goal of the accord is for all of the world’s blockchains to be powered by 100 percent renewables by 2025.
    1. Though things are improving, the fact remains that no Blockchain model is truly energy efficient, so if you’re in doubt as to whether you need it and are concerned about CO2 emissions, you should proceed with caution. In some ways, the problem of the Blockchain is that it hit the public imagination - and that of app developers and entrepreneurs - long before the technology was fully mature (it definitely still isn’t) and many of these scalability and energy-consumption problems have yet to be ironed out. 
    2. The key to this is in sharing resources on a massive scale, both in terms of how networks and modern servers work.
    1. The goal of the GCC is to facilitate a greener and more sustainable art world. Our aim is to provide information and the necessary tools so that we can collectively reduce our carbon footprint by 50% over the next ten years (in line with the Paris agreement), along with near zero-waste practices.
    1. Gestartet 2020 in London als „Gallery Climate Coalition“, verzeichnet das Bündnis um Heath Lowndes, den Managing Director und Ausstellungskoordinator der Thomas Dane Gallery, nach kurzer Zeit bereits mehr als 150 internationale Galerien.
    1. To celebrate their work, I selected the ten most innovative art initiatives in Berlin (in alphabetical order) that engage with environmental issues through their artistic programming and practice.
    1. It is an important aim of ALB, in the form of a close, long-term collaboration with artists, to follow the creative processes and make this visible in exhibitions, events and conferences. Instead of subordinating the artworks on exhibition to theory, we are interested in an inductive approach – that rather places the individual artistic work at the centre of inquiry.
    1. Example of a digital garden using Obsidian Publish. It's also a guide about how to create your own the same way.

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>u/tanepiper</span> in Obsidian Garden - A in-progress guide to creating your digital garden : ObsidianMD (<time class='dt-published'>06/18/2021 09:02:31</time>)</cite></small>

    1. faculty assume that students know how to, for example, take notes

      are note-taking skills taught at all?

    2. reading at the college level can be a real challenge for students from any discipline

      teaching how to read is an ongoing project. Digital reading techniques need to be introduced, reinforced and practiced across courses.

    1. Too many “Digital Gardens” end up as not much more than a record of someone dicking around with their note-taking workflow for a couple of months.

      I've seen this pattern. I suspect some of the issue is having a clean, useful user interface for actually using the thing instead of spending time setting it up and tweaking it.

    1. One reason is that, due to their location and big tech’s sleight of hand magic trick to convince us all that digital culture is immaterial, most people don’t even know they exist. The project lead, Nicole Starosielski (NYU), came out with an excellent and groundbreaking book (The Undersea Network, 2015) drawing attention to its history, architecture and impacts on social groups and the environment
    1. Reflecting on how new digital tools have re-invigorated annotation and contributed to the creation of their recent book, they suggest annotation presents a vital means by which academics can re-engage with each other and the wider world.

      I've been seeing some of this in the digital gardening space online. People are actively hosting their annotations, thoughts, and ideas, almost as personal wikis.

      Some are using RSS and other feeds as well as Webmention notifications so that these notebooks can communicate with each other in a realization of Vanmevar Bush's dream.

      Networked academic samizdat anyone?

    1. I tried all the different static site generators, and I was annoyed with how everything was really complicated. I also came to the realization that I was never going to need a content management system with the amount of blogging I was doing, so I should stop overanalyzing the problem and just do the minimum thing that leads to more writing.

      Great way to put it. One thing that I keep trying to hammer is that the "minimum thing" here looks more like "open up a word processor, use the default settings, focus on capturing the content—i.e. writing things out just as you would if you were dumping these thoughts into a plain text file or keeping it to, say, the subset of Markdown that allows for paragraph breaks, headings, and maybe ordered and unordered lists—and then use your word processor's export-to-HTML support to recast it into the format that lets use their browser to read it, and then FTP/scp/rsync that to a server somewhere".

      This sounds like I'm being hyperbolic, and I kind of am, but I'm also kind of not. The process described is still more reasonable than the craziness that people (HN- and GitHub-type people) end up leaping into when they think of blogging on a personal website. Think about that. Literally uploading Microsoft Word-generated posts to a server* is better than the purpose-built workflows that people are otherwise coming up with (and pushing way too hard).

      (*Although, just please, if you are going to do this, then do at least export to HTML and don't dump them online as PDFs, a la berkshirehathaway.com.)

  4. May 2021
    1. Whether or not digital gardens should follow any standards is an interesting question.

      What features/functionality should a digital garden have? Is there a canonical list yet?

      I wish more supported Webmention to enable the Memex dream...

    1. This runs counter to the time-based structure of traditional blogs: posts presented in reverse chronological order based on publication date.

      Admittedly many blogs primarily operate on time-based order, but it would be fun if more digital gardens provided a most-recently updated feed of their content.

      This particular article is a case in point. I've read it before in an earlier stage and want to follow updates to it. I can subscribe to Maggie's feed, but currently her most recent post in my reader is dated 3 weeks ago. Without seeing a ping from another service to see the notification, I would have missed the significant update to this piece which has prompted me to re-read it for updates on the ideas contained in it.

      Some platforms like MediaWiki do provide feeds for recently updated. My colleague David Shanske has recently updated a WordPress plugin he built so that it provides WordPress sites with a feed for most recent updates, so that one would see not only new content, but also content which is added or updated from the past. As a result, here's his "updated feed" https://david.shanske.com/updated/feed/ which is cleverly useful.

    2. Keeping your garden on the open web also sets you up to take part in the future of gardening. At the moment our gardens are rather solo affairs. We haven't figure out how to make them multi-player. But there's an enthusiastic community of developers and designers trying to fix that. It's hard to say what kind of libraries, frameworks, and design patterns might emerge out of that effort, but it certainly isn't going to happen behind a Medium paywall.

      There are a few of us using Webmention for this. Similarly there are some running open wikis or experiments like Flancian's agora.

    3. One goal of these hyper-personalised gardens is deep contextualisation. The overwhelming lesson of the Web 2.0 social media age is that dumping millions of people together into decontextualised social spaces is a shit show.
    4. Gwern.net was one of the earliest and most consistent gardeners to offer meta-reflections on their work. Each entry comes with:topic tagsstart and end datea stage tag: draft, in progress, or finisheda certainty tag: impossible, unlikely, certain, etc.1-10 importance tagThese are all explained in their website guide, which is worth reading if you're designing your own epistemological system.
    5. Think of it as a spectrum. Things we dump into private WhatsApp group chats, DMs, and cavalier Tweet threads are part of our chaos streams - a continuous flow of high noise / low signal ideas. On the other end we have highly performative and cultivated artefacts like published books that you prune and tend for years.Gardening sits in the middle. It's the perfect balance of chaos and cultivation.

      There's something here that's reminiscent of Craig Mod's essay Post Artifact Books and Publishing.

      Reminder to self: revisit this idea.

    6. The garden helps us move away from time-bound streams and into contextual knowledge spaces.
    7. The conversational feed design of email inboxes, group chats, and InstaTwitBook is fleeting – they're only concerned with self-assertive immediate thoughts that rush by us in a few moments.

      The streamification of the web had already taken hold enough by this point. Anil Dash had an essay in 2012 entitled Stop Publishing Web Pages which underlined this point.

    8. Rory Sutherland (oddly, the vice president of Ogilvy Group)

      His Twitter tag line is: "The Spectator's Wiki Man."

    9. They're not following the conventions of the "personal blog," as we've come to know it.

      There are a number of bloggers who have to some extent, specifically used their blogs for this purpose though. I've documented several at https://boffosocko.com/tag/thought-spaces/

    1. Your new home on the web

      Understory is a digital garden, a micro-publishing space for you to plant the seeds of your ideas and grow them into bi-directionally linked web portals.

      via IndieWeb Chat

    1. What is meant by digital marketing?

      What is meant by digital marketing. digital marketing is a marketing techniques that involves,

      usage of digital medium such as internet and wireless for creating awareness,consideration,purchase and loyalty for a brand, product or a service.

    1. One of the flaws of using Digital Mappa for projects like this appears to be that it acts more as a viewer (as a result of it's original use with maps) than as something for text. As a result, when looking at various pages, the URL of the page and it's attendant resources doesn't change, so one can't link to particular resources within the work, nor can one easily use digital tools (Hypothes.is for example), to anchor and annotate portions of the text.

    2. Susanna Collet's Commonplace Book

    1. This is a facsimile and diplomatic edition of Codex Vercellensis CXVII, Archivio e Biblioteca Capitolare di Vercelli.

      An interesting example of a digitized version of a book.

    1. Despite the surprising lack of digital editions, the commonplace book, more than any other genre of writing, seems well suited to a digital format, since, by its very structure, it is a linked web of fragments that have been “coded” and “marked up” with metadata. For this reason, we have put much thought and planning into which tools to use and how design this digital edition.
  5. Apr 2021
    1. While it is impossible to imagine surveillance capitalism without the digital, it is easy to imagine the digital without surveillance capitalism.

      Important point: this is not the only version of digital culture that is possible.

    1. Though its format can be copied and manipulated, HTML doesn’t make that easy.

      In fact, HTML makes it very easy (true for the reasons that lead Mark to write that it can be copied and manipulated). It's contemporary authoring systems and the typical author-as-publisher and the choices they make that are what makes this difficult.

      The future of rich media lies in striving to be more like dead media (or at least mining it for insights by better understanding it through thoughtful study), rather than the misguided attempts we've been living inside.

      (This is something that I've done a 180 on in the last year or so.)

    2. It’s designed so that whoever produced the video controls how it appears, and how it’s used.

      It is exactly that "timid" ("tepid"?) attempt at dynamism that has led to these circumstances.

    1. This looks fascinating. I'm not so much interested in the coding/programming part as I am the actual "working in public" portions as they relate to writing, thinking, blogging in the open and sharing that as part of my own learning and growth as well as for sharing that with a broader personal learning network. I'm curious what lessons might be learned within this frame or how educators and journalists might benefit from it.

    1. Pero millones de niños no disfrutan de ese acceso, o su acceso es intermitente o de calidad inferior y, con mucha frecuencia, son los niños que ya están más desposeídos. Esto agrava aún más su privación, denegándoles efectivamente las aptitudes y el conocimiento que podrían ayudarles a desarrollar su potencial y a romper los ciclos intergeneracionales de desventaja y de pobreza

      Sin duda esta brecha digital, es uno de los factores que aportan al analfabetismo digital, podría decir que son factores paralelos que a su vez están limitando el conocimiento y las capacidades que pueden llegar a recibir quienes si tienen acceso de calidad a estas herramientas

    2. La tecnología digital supone ya uno de los cambios más radicales de nuestro tiempo,

      Esta idea de lo inevitable que carcteriza el discurso de las tecnologías en general, se supone que responde a un cambio cultural de la época y que toca a todas las personas, incluyendo a los niños; sin embargo tapa otras motivaciones, otras urgencias para esta innovación tecnológica que es bastante evidente; se relaciona con los planes de negocios y económicos, los planes de las empresas tecnológicas para las cuales la idea de este cambio inevitable, desde los cuales se presentan sus propuestas digitales, es funcional a sus estrategias de mercado. las empresas necesitan que se crea que se tiene que entrar en esos escenarios de cambios y de innovación para poder vender los productos que sacan al mercado.

    3. Aunque la mayoría de los niños que están en línea lo ven como una experiencia positiva,

      La idea de una era digital se ha naturalizado, por tanto los niños acceden a su uso e interactúan en las redes con desconocimiento frente a los riesgos que estos medios pueden contener.

    4. nternet es todas estas cosas, que reflejan y amplifican lo mejor y lo peor de la naturaleza humana. Es una herramienta que siempre se usará para hacer el bien y para hacer el mal. Nuestra labor consiste en mitigar los daños y ampliar las oportunidades que la tecnología digital hace posible.

      Preparar a los niños para enfrentar los nuevos tiempos, no es prepararlos para adaptarse sino para resistir la constante violencia a la que el mundo globalizado con su economía y sus relaciones de consumo somenten a las personas ( en especial a la infancia) en esta era (tecnológica). Demanda de la escuela y nosotros los maestros, la construcción de un espacio ético desde el cual podamos construir junto con los niños una mirada crítica sobre esas reaciones que se están dando y buscar formas de deconstrucción, de desingenuación de esas mismas relaciones tan perjudiciales, tan nocivas.

    1. There are surprisingly few digital editions of commonplace books, especially given how the genre lends itself to digitization. What we've made isn't perfect but we hope it helps others think through/with these types of books. More about that here: digitalbookhistory.com/colletscommonp…

      I've seen some people building digital commonplace books in real time, but I'm also curious to see more academics doing it and seeing what tools and platforms they're using to do it.

      Given the prevalence for these in text, I'd be particularly curious to see them being done as .txt or .md files and then imported into platforms like Obsidian, Roam Research, Org Mode, TiddlyWiki, et al for cross linking and backlinking.

      I've seen some evidence of people doing some of this with copies of the bible, but yet to see anyone digitize and cross link old notebooks or commonplace books.

  6. Mar 2021
    1. We think of mobile phones as a transformational technology,

      The transformative role of mobile phones is primarily in how they are enabling the other half of the global population to access the internet via mobile networks.

    1. An NFT is a crypto-token on a blockchain. The token is virtual — the thing you own is a cryptographic key to a particular address on the blockchain — but legally, it’s property that you can buy, own or sell like any other property.

      It's already caused society a lot of harm to treat corporations as people. Turning digital assets into property seems like a similar mistake in the making.

    1. López, J. A. M., Arregui-Garcĺa, B., Bentkowski, P., Bioglio, L., Pinotti, F., Boëlle, P.-Y., Barrat, A., Colizza, V., & Poletto, C. (2020). Anatomy of digital contact tracing: Role of age, transmission setting, adoption and case detection. MedRxiv, 2020.07.22.20158352. https://doi.org/10.1101/2020.07.22.20158352