41 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. There must be an ‘industrial revolution’ in education

      This first phrase is the most telling of all the issues we deal with on the edtech front. Because the industrial revolution touched almost every aspect of life since its inception, everyone presumes that it must also affect education.

      Sadly other than helping to make searching for and obtaining material much quicker, it still needs to be consumed, thought about, and digested by a student. The industrial revolution simply hasn't increased the bandwith of the common student's brain. It's unlikely that anything in the near future will expand it.

  2. Feb 2019
    1. Main aim of industrial wastewater treatment is to lower the number of solids such as waste product, organic materials, and sand from industrial wastewater. This wastewater treatment can lead to water sustainability and be a roadway of preventing the scarcity of potable water in India. For more details read article.

    1. ATE provides various kinds of Industrial mixers and blenders are majorly used for combining any type of liquid or solid during the manufacturing process. These are largely used in cosmetic, pharmaceutical, chemical, agricultural, pulp and paper, automotive, water treatment, adhesive, and sealant industries. These mixer and blenders are easy to install, and very little maintenance cost required.

    1. Ecoaxis introduced industrial IoT solution for plastic processing machines which help to improve efficiency, productivity and quality. Our IoT (Internet of Things) gateway helps connect your various plastic processing machines and utilities to capture and securely transfer accurate data to the cloud for advanced analytics.

  3. Aug 2018
    1. ut it will also have to come to terms with confronting 'the Other' (Fabian, 1983), with 'the curious asymmetry' still prevailing as a result of advanced industrial societies receiving a mainly endogenous and synchronic analytic treatment, while 'developing' societies are often seen in exogenous, diachronic terms. Study of 'Time and the Other' presupposes, often implicitly, that the Other lives in another time, or at least on a different time-scale. And indeed, when looking at the integrative but also potentially divisive 'timing' facilitated by modern communication and information-processing technology, is it not correct to say that new divisions, on a temporal scale, are being created between those who have access to such devices and those who do not? Is not one part of humanity, despite globalization, in danger of being left behind, in a somewhat anachronistic age?

      Nowotny argues that "the Other" (non-western, developing countries, Global South -- my words, not hers) is presumed to be on a different time scale than industrial societies. Different "cultural variations and how societal experience shapes the construction of time and temporal reference..."

      This has implications for ICT devices.

    2. only structural functional theory, but all postfunctionalist 'successor' theories for their lack in taking up 'substantive' temporal issues, he was also pleading from the selective point of view of Third World countries for the exploration of theoretically possible alternatives or, to put it into other words, the delineation of what in the experience of western and non-western societies so far is universally valid and yet historically restric-ted. Such questions touch the very essence of the process of moderniz-ation. They evoke images of a closed past and an open or no longer so open future, of structures of collective memory as well as shifting collec-tive and individual identities of people who are increasingly drawn into the processes of world-wide integration and globalization. Anthropologi-cal accounts are extremely rich in different time reckoning modes and systems, in the pluritemporalism that prevailed in pre-industrialized societies. The theory of historical time - or times - both from a western and non-western point of view still has to be written. There exists already an impressive corpus of writings analysing the rise of the new dominant 'western' concept of time and especially its links with the process of industrialization. The temporal representations underlying the different disciplines in the social sciences allow not only for a reconceptualization of their division of intellectual labour, but also for a programmatic view forward towards a 'science of multiple times' (Grossin, 1989). However, any such endeavour has to come to terms also with non-western temporal experience.

      Evokes Adam's critique of colonialization of time, commodification/post-industrial views, and need for post-colonial temporal studies.

  4. Jul 2018
    1. This is so because all cultures, ancient and modern, have established collective ways of relat­ing to the past and future, of synchronizing their activities, of coming to terms with finitude. How we extend ourselves into the past and future, how we pursue immortality and how we temporally manage, organize and regulate our social affairs, however, has been culturally, historically and contex­tually distinct. Each htstorical epoch with its new forms of socioeconomic expression is simultaneously restructuring its social relations of time.

      Sociotemporal reactions/responses/concepts have deep historical roots and intercultural relationships.

      Current ways of thinking about time continue to be significantly influenced by post-industrial socio-economic constructs, like clock-time, labor efficiencies (speed), and value metaphors (money, attention, thrift).

    2. the Reformation had a major role to play in the metamor­phosis of time from God's gift to commodified, comp�essed, colonized and controlled resource. These four Cs of mdus­trial time -comrnodification, compression, colonization and control -will be the focus in these pages, the fifth C of the creation of clock time having been discussed already in the previous chapter. I show their interdependence and id�ntify some of the socio-environmental impacts of those parttcular temporal relations.

      Five C's of industrial time: Commodification, compression, colonialization, control, and clock time.

  5. Nov 2017
  6. Oct 2017
    1. Military Industrial Complex:

      1. Eisenhower has seen the consequences of this intersection of military power and his own "new look" policy

      Presidential speeches can be measured by how long we talk about them. Still one of the most referenced presidential speeches ever given.

      IRAN — Mohammed Mossafegh (1951–1954)

      • First military Coup during CIA golden age
      • US tells Shah Mohammad Reza Pahlavi (1941–1979) that they will take over the country unless he overthrows Mossafegh.
      • For 20+ years we supported a dictator who murdered his own people
      • Any nation state has the option to buy out foreign companies

      Guatemala — Jacobo Arbenz Guzman (1951–1954)

      • Democratically elected leader, called for Progressive Reform (second President to do so)
      • Nationalizing land (US decided it looked like Communism)
      • Guzman runs into problems with the United Fruit Company, who had been cheating on their taxes, undervaluing their land prices. Government seeks to purchase land to nationalize it, and wants to buy it for the price that the UFC valued their land for.
      • UFC and US Government set up a military Coup. Using radio broadcast propaganda, pretending that an army is ravaging the countryside. Guzman believes the propaganda and flees. We set up a dictator.
  7. Jul 2017
  8. May 2017
    1. American Industrial Health Council

      This may be a front group. Investigate, find additional sources, and leave research notes in the comments.

    2. American Industrial Health Council

      This may be a front group. Investigate, find additional sources, and leave research notes in the comments.

    1. American Industrial Health Council

      This may be a front group. Investigate, find additional sources, and leave research notes in the comments.

    2. American Industrial Health Council

      This may be a front group. Investigate, find additional sources, and leave research notes in the comments.

    1. American Industrial Health Council

      This may be a front group. Investigate, find additional sources, and leave research notes in the comments.

    2. American Industrial Health Council

      This may be a front group. Investigate, find additional sources, and leave research notes in the comments.

    1. American Industrial Health Council

      This may be a front group. Investigate, find additional sources, and leave research notes in the comments.

    2. American Industrial Health Council

      This may be a front group. Investigate, find additional sources, and leave research notes in the comments.

    1. American Industrial Health Council

      This may be a front group. Investigate, find additional sources, and leave research notes in the comments.

    2. American Industrial Health Council

      This may be a front group. Investigate, find additional sources, and leave research notes in the comments.

    1. American Industrial Health Council

      This may be a front group. Investigate, find additional sources, and leave research notes in the comments.

    2. American Industrial Health Council

      This may be a front group. Investigate, find additional sources, and leave research notes in the comments.

    1. American Industrial Health Council

      This may be a front group. Investigate, find additional sources, and leave research notes in the comments.

    2. American Industrial Health Council

      This may be a front group. Investigate, find additional sources, and leave research notes in the comments.

  9. Mar 2017
    1. Bluenose caribou herd

      Many of the same concerns regarding the well-being of the Bluenose caribou herd in the Berger Inquiry are still being discussed today due to continued industrial exploration, specifically regarding oil and gas, in the Northwest Territories and the Arctic. Since oil and gas are still valued resources in our current societies, exploration continues in the North, as described by Anne Dunn and her colleagues in the 2009 Arctic publication. These concerns include changes of habitat due to the introduction or industrial development such as roads, oilfields, mines, etc. The attraction of job opportunity to areas surrounding the Bluenose caribou herd could potentially cause an increase in demand of caribou meat. Increased income as a result of employment for industrial exploration allows for the advancement of hunting methods regarding the locating of caribou and utilization of year-round roads implemented originally for industrial exploration. The concerns regarding the Bluenose East and Bluenose West caribou herds of the Northwest Territories result specifically from oil and gas exploration (Gunn et al. 2009, iii).

      Besides industrial exploration, there are concerns about the population and survival of the Bluenose caribou herd surrounding climate trends. Specifically, warmer temperatures will affect the environmental conditions in which the caribou rely on for sustenance. An increased temperature in the wintertime could correspond to more freeze-thaw cycles (Gunn et al. 2009, iii).

      Regarding population size, according to the Arctic journal, “migratory wild reindeer and caribou numbers have dropped by about one-third since populations peaked in the 1990s and early 2000s”. There are natural periods of abundance and scarcity among migratory tundra caribou herds. These increases and decreases in population size are likely results of “continental climate switches” (Gunn et al. 2009, iii). According to the Northwest Territories Environment and Natural Resources division, the Bluenose West caribou herd was estimated to have population of 112,000 in 1992. In 2015, its population was estimated to be approximately 15,000. The Bluenose East caribou herd was estimated to have a population of 104,000 in 2000. In 2015, its population was estimated to be between 35,000 and 40,000 (Northwest Territories).

      References

      Gunn, Anne, Don Russell, Robert G. White, and Gary<br> Kofinas. "Facing a Future of Change: Wild<br> Migratory Caribou and Reindeer." Arctic 62, no. 3 (2009): Iii-Vi. http://www.jstor.org/stable/40513303.

      Northwest Territories: Environment and Natural Resources. "Barren-ground Caribou: Northern Herds." Environment and Natural Resources. Accessed March 08, 2017. http://www.enr.gov.nt.ca/node/2979.

    1. Now they recognize they are not essential

      In the late 1800s and early 1900s northern explorers depended on the indigenous people. The natives knew the land, the climate, and the wildlife. Because of their knowledge, the indigenous northerners served as local guides in this harsh and uninviting place. The native people also served as interpreters for researchers and were a lifeline for those that had little-to-no knowledge of how to survive in that kind of environment. However, they were not always seen as important figures. As southern technologies became more and more prominent in the far north, native peoples were pushed aside. “The airplane and helicopter strained relations among researchers and northerners. These technologies relieved field-workers from establishing extensive and regular relationships with locals as guides, interpreters, and informants. Permafrost scientists in particular could produce knowledge about the Arctic environment without Inuit expertise and apply that research in governmental construction projects without consulting locals” (108). The Inuits began to view the government scientists as pests, “they arrived in summer ‘in lusty swarm’ and were just as annoying” (108). Many researchers come during the warm months and gather information that allows them to cut ties to the indigenous people. The use of modern technology in the north forces Inuit to work menial jobs and completely change their way of life in order to survive in the modernizing landscape. While the industrial system has brought many valuable things to them, the Inuit are no longer needed or heard. If it is in the best interest of the oil industry, a pipeline would be built right over their homeland, even if they are still on it.

      Annotation drawn form Stuhl, Andrew. Unfreezing the Arctic: Science, Colonialism, and the Transformation of Inuit Lands. Chicago: The University of Chicago Press, 2016.

  10. Feb 2017
  11. Nov 2016
    1. "Creo que Trump enfocará la mayor parte de su atención en los cuatro estados del cinturón industrial de los Grandes Lagos, que votan predominantemente por el Partido Demócrata: Michigan, Ohio, Pensilvania y Wisconsin", sostiene Michael Moore. Según el documentalista, todo lo que necesita Trump para ganar "son estos cuatro estados. No necesita Florida. No necesita Colorado o Virginia. Solo Michigan, Ohio, Pensilvania y Wisconsin"
  12. Oct 2016
    1. Oklahoma Correctional Industries; workers scan the original photos and prepare metadata

      We can make the argument here that the University of North Texas, the Oklahoma Historical Society, and the Ethics in Journalism Foundation support de facto slave labor. Let's be honest here: "workers" = "prisoners"

  13. Jul 2016
    1. The military’s contributions to education technology are often overlooked

      Though that may not really be the core argument of the piece, it’s more than a passing point. Watters’s raising awareness of this other type of “military-industrial complex” could have a deep impact on many a discussion, including the whole hype about VR (and AR). It’s not just Carnegie-Mellon and Paris’s Polytechnique («l’X») which have strong ties to the military. Or (D)ARPANET. Reminds me of IU’s Dorson getting money for the Folklore Institute during the Cold War by arguing that the Soviets were funding folklore. Even the head of the NEH in 2000 talked about Sputnik and used the language of “beating Europe at culture” when discussing plans for the agency. Not that it means the funding or “innovation” would come directly from the military but it’s all part of the Cold War-era “ideology”. In education, it’s about competing with India or Finland. In other words, the military is part of a much larger plan for “world domination”.

  14. Feb 2016
    1. We are on the threshold of sweeping change that will make it easier for teachers to teach and students to learn faster and more effectively

      I see this as evidence of technology determinism, which this article is shot through with. This kind of sentiment comes off as if technologies make things better, faster, more efficient for all involved parties, without consequence. It also assumes a consensus around what improved teaching and learning looks like and means. IMO, "efficiency" recalls turn of 20th century industrialist philosophy and rhetoric. In the work of education, I think that we need to ask if efficiency really is always better, and better for who. I am suggesting that in many cases efficiency is better for administrators from a business perspective, but not so for learners.

  15. Dec 2015
    1. purchasable à la carte

      How many units of learning per dollar?

    2. Unbundling has played out in almost every media industry.

      And the shift away from “access to content” is still going on, a decade and a half after Napster. If education is a “content industry” and “content industries” are being disrupted, then education will be disrupted… by becoming even more “industrial”.

  16. Jul 2015
    1. sovereign wealth funds

      "sovereign wealth funds" is like a gajillion word score in Tory bingo.

      Thinking a lot lately about translating ideas/policies of the left into language the right can hear/engage with/adopt without feeling they've lost.

  17. Nov 2013