211 Matching Annotations
  1. Sep 2021
    1. Saying that web devs used to be fine with relative imports is like saying that human beings used to be fine living without refrigerators. Sure we did. But was it better than it is now? No. No, it wasn't.
    1. Update API usage of the view helpers by changing javascript_packs_with_chunks_tag and stylesheet_packs_with_chunks_tag to javascript_pack_tag and stylesheet_pack_tag. Ensure that your layouts and views will only have at most one call to javascript_pack_tag or stylesheet_pack_tag. You can now pass multiple bundles to these view helper methods.

      Good move. Rather than having 2 different methods, and requiring people to "go out of their way" to "opt in" to using chunks by using the longer-named javascript_packs_with_chunks_tag, they changed it to just use chunks by default, out of the box.

      Now they don't need 2 similar but separate methods that do nearly the same, which makes things simpler and easier to understand (no longer have to stop and ask oneself, which one should I use? what's the difference?).

      You can't get it "wrong" now because there's only one option.

      And by switching that method to use the shorter name, it makes it clearer that that is the usual/common/recommended way to go.

    2. Webpacker used to configure Webpack indirectly, which lead to a complicated secondary configuration process. This was done in order to provide default configurations for the most popular frameworks, but ended up creating more complexity than it cured. So now Webpacker delegates all configuration directly to Webpack's default configuration setup.

      more trouble than it's worth

      • creating more complexity than it cured
    1. This is no different from other popular libraries or frameworks making huge architectural changes (think React 16.8 with hooks or Python 3). The longer you wait to make the switch, the more painful it will be for your project when you finally do. And in the meantime, you’ll be missing out on valuable improvements to a fundamental part of the workflow of every single project you work on.
  2. Aug 2021
  3. developer.mozilla.org developer.mozilla.org
    1. If you forget to define x in the object you pass as the second argument, or if there's some similar bug or confusion, you won't get an error -- just unexpected results.
  4. Jul 2021
  5. datatracker.ietf.org datatracker.ietf.org
    1. When an endpoint is to interpret a byte stream as UTF-8 but finds that the byte stream is not, in fact, a valid UTF-8 stream, that endpoint MUST _Fail the WebSocket Connection_. This rule applies both during the opening handshake and during subsequent data exchange.
  6. Jun 2021
  7. May 2021
    1. Your brain is a leaky bucket. If you're dedicated to filling it with knowledge, you should be equally dedicated to sealing the leak. Here's how.

      way better for the opening of an article

    1. CommonJS has served us well for many years, but ESM comes with many benefits, like language-level syntax, browser support, defaults to strict mode, async loading, top-level await, improved static analysis & tree-shaking, and more.
    1. MJML has been designed with responsiveness in mind. The abstraction it offers guarantee you to always be up-to-date with the industry practices and responsive. Email clients update their specs and requirements regularly, but we geek about that stuff - we’ll stay on top of it so you can spend less time reading up on latest email client updates and more time designing beautiful email.
  8. Apr 2021
    1. The main difference is in the flow of how messages are ultimately sent to devices for output. The standard library Logger logic converts the log entries to strings and then sends the string to the device to be written to a stream. Lumberjack, on the other hand, sends structured data in the form of a Lumberjack::LogEntry to the device and lets the device worry about how to format it. The reason for this flip is to better support structured data logging. Devices (even ones that write to streams) can format the entire payload including non-string objects and tags however they need to.
    2. There is a similar feature in the standard library Logger class, but the implementation here is safe to use with multiple processes writing to the same log file.
    3. Lumberjack 1.0 had a concept of a unit of work id that could be used to tie log messages together. This has been replaced by tags. There is still an implementation of Lumberjack.unit_of_work, but it is just a wrapper on the tag implementation.
    1. What you want is not to detect if stdin is a pipe, but if stdin/stdout is a terminal.

      The OP wasn't wrong in exactly the way this comment implies: he didn't just ask how to detect whether stdin is a pipe. The OP actaully asked how to detect whether it is a terminal or a pipe. The only mistake he made, then, was in assuming those were the only two possible alternatives, when in fact there is (apparently) a 3rd one: that stdin is redirected from a file (not sure why the OS would need to treat that any differently from a pipe/stream but apparently it does).

      This omission is answered/corrected more clearly here:

      stdin can be a pipe or redirected from a file. Better to check if it is interactive than to check if it is not.

    2. stdin can be a pipe or redirected from a file. Better to check if it is interactive than to check if it is not.
    1. Factory FunNER is the sequel and a very solid improvement to Factory Fun. It uses hexes instead of squares to allow more creative building, and some subtle improvements to scoring, length, and machine placement rules really improve things.
    1. Now that we’ve gotten newer layout features — again, like grid and flexbox — floats, too, have sort of fallen by the wayside, perhaps either because there are better ways to accomplish what they do
  9. Mar 2021
    1. Your validation functions should also treat undefined and '' as the same. This is not too difficult since both undefined and '' are falsy in javascript. So a "required" validation rule would just be error = value ? undefined : 'Required'.
    1. As to why both is_a? and kind_of? exist: I suppose it's part of Ruby's design philosophy. Python would say there should only be one way to do something; Ruby often has synonymous methods so you can use the one that sounds better. It's a matter of preference.
    1. non-regression testing

      That would probably be a better name because you're actually testing/verifying that there hasn't been any regression.

      You're testing for the absence of regression. But I guess testing for one also tests for the other, so it probably doesn't matter. (If something is not true you know it is false, etc.)

    1. Clearly JS and NPM have done a lot RIGHT, judging by success and programmer satisfaction. How do we keep that right and fix the wrong?
  10. Feb 2021
    1. In combination with [Track()], the :magnetic_to option allows for a neat way to spawn custom tracks outside of the conventional Railway or FastTrack schema.

      Instead of magnetic_to:, I propose wrapping the steps that are on a separate track in something like...

        DefTrack do :paypal do
          step :charge_paypal
        end
      

      or

        paypal_track = RailwayTrack do :paypal do
          step :charge_paypal
        end
      

      so we can reference it from outputs, like we can with tracks created with Path helper.

    2. The activity gem is an extraction from Trailblazer 2.0, where we only had operations. Operations expose a linear flow which goes into one direction, only. While this was a massive improvement over messily nested code, we soon decided it’s cool being able to model non-linear flows. This is why activities are the major concept since Trailblazer 2.1.
    1. Since we're not passing any inputs to ListAccounts, it makes sense to use .run! instead of .run. If it failed, that would mean we probably messed up writing the interaction.
    2. compose(Add, x: x, y: 3)

      How is this better than simply:

      Add.run(x: x, y: 3)
      

      ?

      I guess if we did that we would also have to remember to handle merging errors from that outcome into self...

    3. account.first_name = first_name if first_name.present? account.last_name = last_name if last_name.present?

      I guess this is needed so we don't reset to nil (erasing value in database) when they haven't even provided a new value as input.

      But surely there's a cleaner way...

    4. ActiveInteraction plays nicely with Rails. You can use interactions to handle your business logic instead of models or controllers.
    5. Since we're using an interaction, we don't need strong parameters. The interaction will ignore any inputs that weren't defined by filters. So you can forget about params.require and params.permit because interactions handle that for you.
    6. Why is all this interaction code better? Two reasons: One, you can reuse the FindAccount interaction in other places, like your API controller or a Resque task. And two, if you want to change how accounts are found, you only have to change one place.

      Pretty weak arguments though...

      1. We could just as easily used a plain object or module to extract this for easy reuse and having it in only one place (avoiding duplication).
    1. That’s it. If you have a previous “precompile” array, in your app config, it will continue to work. For continuity sake I recommend moving over those declarations to your manifest.js file so that it will be consistent.
    2. Instead of having this confusing maze of lambdas, regexes, and strings, we could, in theory, introduce a single entry point of configuration for Sprockets to use, and in that file declare all assets we wanted to compile. Well, that’s exactly what the manifest.js file is.
    1. You’re allowed to blame us for a terrible developer experience in Trailblazer 2.0. It’s been quite painful to find out which step caused an exception. However, don’t look back in anger! We’ve spent a lot of time on working out a beautiful way for both tracing and debugging Trailblazer activities in 2.1.
    1. While Trailblazer offers you abstraction layers for all aspects of Ruby On Rails, it does not missionize you. Wherever you want, you may fall back to the "Rails Way" with fat models, monolithic controllers, global helpers, etc. This is not a bad thing, but allows you to step-wise introduce Trailblazer's encapsulation in your app without having to rewrite it.
    1. Yes, Trailblazer is adding new abstractions and concepts and they are different to the 90s-Ruby, but now, at the latest, it becomes obvious how this improves the developing process. We’re no longer talking in two-dimensional method stack traces or byebug hoops, the language and conception is changing to the actual higher level code flow, to activities sitting in activities structured into smaller step units.
    2. The new call API is much more consistent and takes away another thing we kept explaining to new users - an indicator for a flawed API.
    3. We removed the trailblazer-loader gem just like Apple removed the headphone jack from the iPhone 6. This brings you faster startup and consistency with Rails autoloading.
    1. As of today, you can Wishlist OpenTTD on SteamE. Historically, OpenTTD always had a single home from where we distributed the game. We used to be hosted on SourceForge (you know you are old, if you remember that being a thing :D), and slowly moved towards our own self-created distribution methods. These days, we mostly distribute our game via our website. But times are changing, and so is our hair. Over the last few months, we have silently been working to become a bit more visible in the world. Don’t worry, not for reasons you might think: OpenTTD has as many active users as it had in 2007. But more because we no longer think it is the right approach to only distribute via our own website. This became painfully apparent when we noticed other people post OpenTTD on some stores. They are not always updated with new releases, sometimes even slacking behind a few years. And maybe more important to us: we can not guarantee that the uploaded version is unmodified and is the version as we intended. So, instead of fighting it, why not turn around and join them! Why not release our own, verified, builds on those stores! And this is exactly what we have been working on lately. And when I say “we”, a bit ironic to me, I mean the two developers that are around longest (myself and orudge) ;) A while back orudge added OpenTTD to the Microsoft Store. And today, I am happy to announce we will be on SteamE too! Well, we are on Steam, but we haven’t released anything there yet (sorry that I got your hopes up, just to squash them right after :( ). This is partially because of how Steam works, but also because we know we can bring a better experience for Steam with our upcoming release. That brings me to the most exciting news: if everything goes as planned, we will release OpenTTD 1.11 on Steam on the first of April, 2021! And that is not even an April fools’ joke! You can already Wishlist OpenTTD today .. and till we release on Steam, you can find our game via our website ;)
    1. As of today, you can Wishlist OpenTTD on SteamE. Historically, OpenTTD always had a single home from where we distributed the game. We used to be hosted on SourceForge (you know you are old, if you remember that being a thing :D), and slowly moved towards our own self-created distribution methods. These days, we mostly distribute our game via our website. But times are changing, and so is our hair. Over the last few months, we have silently been working to become a bit more visible in the world. Don’t worry, not for reasons you might think: OpenTTD has as many active users as it had in 2007. But more because we no longer think it is the right approach to only distribute via our own website.
    1. Well, I'm glad they did, because Turbolinks is a much better piece of software than jquery-pjax ever was. It's actively maintained and doesn't require jQuery at all! So we're one step closer to our dream of ditching $.
  11. Jan 2021
    1. Systemd problems might not have mattered that much, except that GNOME has a similar attitude; they only care for a small subset of the Linux desktop users, and they have historically abandoned some ways of interacting the Desktop in the interest of supporting touchscreen devices and to try to attract less technically sophisticated users. If you don't fall in the demographic of what GNOME supports, you're sadly out of luck.
    1. Moving DOM elements around made me anxious and I wanted to preserve natural tab order without resorting to setting tabindex, so I also made a flexbox version that never moves DOM elements around. I think it's the superior solution, at least for the layouts I was going for. https://github.com/wickning1/svelte-components/blob/master/src/FlexCardLayout.svelte
    1. Popper for Svelte with actions, no wrapper components or component bindings required! Other Popper libraries for Svelte (including the official @popperjs/svelte library) use a wrapper component that takes the required DOM elements as props. Not only does this require multiple bind:this, you also have to pollute your script tag with multiple DOM references. We can do better with Svelte actions!
    1. When there are imperfections, we rely on users and our active community to tell us how the software is not working correctly, so we can fix it. The way we do that, and have done for 15 years now, is via bug reports. Discussion is great, but detailed bug reports are better for letting developers know what’s wrong.
    2. The benefits for developers do reflect on benefits for users, with more software delivered faster and more securely.
    3. What’s the use of ie. snap libreoffice if it can’t access documents on a samba server in my workplace ? Should I really re-organize years of storage and work in my office for being able to use snap ? A too high price to pay, for the moment.
    4. I - we all - totally agree about the benefits of snap for developers. But the loss of comfort and flexibility for end user is eventually a no-go option.
    5. I clearly understand why snap is a safety progress on server and IoT but in my « human » usage snap is just restricting how I use my data and computer.
  12. Dec 2020
  13. Nov 2020
    1. There was a major refactoring in the resolver (https://github.com/webpack/enhanced-resolve). This means the resolving option were changed too. Mostly simplification and changes that make it more unlikely to configure it incorrectly.
    1. How many times have you heard the cliché, for example, read between the lines? It turns out, the key to reading between the lines is actually to write between the lines. Once you start, you'll discover a whole new reading experience, elevated from that of a one-sided lecture to a two-sided conversation.

      reading as a conversation between myself and the text.

    1. I encounter this problem in all of my Svelte projects- feels like I'm missing something. Fighting it with absolute positioning usually forces me to re-write a lot of CSS multiple times. Is there is a better way to solve this that I've overlooked?
    1. {#key} was introduced in Svelte v3.28, before that you needed to use a keyed {#each} block with only one item When the key changes, svelte removes the component and adds a new one, therefor triggering the transition.
    1. Svelte's advantage here is that it indicates the need for an update at the place where the associated data is updated, instead of at each place the data is used. Then each template expression of reactive statement is able to check very quickly if it needs to rerender or not.
    2. Svelte slots are much easier to use and reason about than Angular transclude, especially in cases where you don't want an extra wrapper element around the slot content.
    1. If your Svelte components contain <style> tags, by default the compiler will add JavaScript that injects those styles into the page when the component is rendered. That's not ideal, because it adds weight to your JavaScript, prevents styles from being fetched in parallel with your code, and can even cause CSP violations. A better option is to extract the CSS into a separate file. Using the emitCss option as shown below would cause a virtual CSS file to be emitted for each Svelte component. The resulting file is then imported by the component, thus following the standard Webpack compilation flow.
    1. When you’re implementing a bad plan yourself, instead of having a mentor bail you out by fixing it, a few really useful things happen:You learn many more details about why it was a bad idea. If someone else tells you your plan is bad, they’ll probably list the top two or three reasons. By actually following through, you’ll also get to learn reasons 4–1,217.You spend about 100x more time thinking about how you’ll avoid ever making that type of mistake again, i.e., digesting what you’ve learned and integrating it into your overall decision-making.By watching my mistakes and successes play out well or badly over the course of months, I was able to build much more detailed, precise models about what does and doesn’t matter for long-term codebase health. Eventually, that let me make architectural decisions with much more conviction.

      There's a benefit to embarking on a challenge without a more experienced authority to bail you out.

      • You learn many more details about why it's a bad idea.
      • The lessons you learn in terms of how to avoid the mistakes you made stick with you longer

      (I would add that the experience is more visceral, it activates more modalities in your brain, and you remember it much more clearly.)

      These types of experiences result in what the author calls more "detailed, precise models". For me they result in a sort of intuition.

  14. Oct 2020
    1. Instead of this, you can use a File type variable.
    2. Previously, a common pattern was to read the value of a CI variable, save it in a file, and then use that file in your script:
    1. In the software industry we use "dependency" to refer to the relationship between two objects. We say "looking for dependents" for relationships to dependent things and "looking for dependencies" for relationships to prerequisite things, so it gets that connotation, but the literal meaning is the relationship itself, not the object. Finding a better word is exactly the point of the question
    1. To escape from the chaos, we will need new norms of behavior that incline us away from gossip.

      To balance out this gossip-driven world, Arnold Kling argues we need new norms of behavior (I would argue perhaps we need new mechanisms), to incline us away from gossip.

    1. You might think something like “don’t request the same resource thousands of times a day, especially when it explicitly tells you it should be considered fresh for 90 days” would be obvious, but unfortunately it seems not.