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  1. Last 7 days
    1. These included a government decision to suspend efforts to halve the use of pesticides by the end of this decade, the Daily Telegraph reported

      for - wicked problem - immediate vs future survival - EU agricultural protests

  2. Feb 2024
    1. watched Tinderbox Meetup 2023-12-03 featuring Jorge Arango

      Attendees: Mark Bernstein, Michael Becker, Jorge Arango,

      Introductions: Rolf Huber (Information Architect)

      Featured

      • many different definitions of notes (types...)
      • Damien Newman scribble drawing as a representation or diagram of the design process (22:42)
      • 2x2 grid matrix of evergreen versus transient and mnemonic versus generative.(27:00)
      • contacts, recipes, book highlights and marginalia in the mnemonic/evergreen quadrant; to do lists, grocery list, appointments in the mnemonic/transient quadrant; sticky notes, mind maps, project plans, tinderbox in the generative/transient quadrant; knowledge gardens, zettelkasten, pkm systems in the generative/evergreen;

      • What does the structure of containers in each of these spaces look like? How simple or complex are they?

      • There can be growth from one space into others, (especially from the mnemonic into generative).

      • Chuck Wade mentions that email fits into all four of the quadrants.

      • Cathy Marshall used "information gardening" in Xerox Park setting... (source?) It may have been mentioned in Arango's interview of Mark Bernstein on The Informed Life.

      Arango came to knowledge gardening via Brian Eno essay on architecture and gardening metaphor.

      Three Rules of Knowledge Gardening

      1. Make short notes; create enough context to help out your future self
      2. Connect your notes
      3. Nurture your notes; revisit, build, feedback

      Q&A

      Dave Rogers - we should challenge our notes rather than "nurturing them";

      JA: Perhaps we could use AI/GPT to "steel man" our arguments?

      Hookmark: https://hookproductivity.com/

      Gordon Brander's Noosphere - protocol to define the problem of linking things quickly at internet scale.

    1. do you seriously think the Future Of Interaction should be a single finger?

      The next time you make breakfast, pay attention to the exquisitely intricate choreography of opening cupboards and pouring the milk — notice how your limbs move in space, how effortlessly you use your weight and balance. The only reason your mind doesn't explode every morning from the sheer awesomeness of your balletic achievement is that everyone else in the world can do this as well. With an entire body at your command

    2. What is the Future Of Interaction?

      The most important thing to realize about the future is that it's a choice. People choose which visions to pursue, people choose which research gets funded, people choose how they will spend their careers.

      Despite how it appears to the culture at large, technology doesn't just happen. It doesn't emerge spontaneously, pulling us helplessly toward some inevitable destiny. Revolutionary technology comes out of long research, and research is performed and funded by inspired people.

      And this is my plea — be inspired by the untapped potential of human capabilities. Don't just extrapolate yesterday's technology and then cram people into it.

    1. Setapart from the familiar social contexts of family, work, and school,the closed camp was designed to break down identifications withsocial milieus and to promote Entbürgerlichung (purging bourgeoiselements) and Verkameradshaftung (comradeship) as part of theprocess of Volkwerdung, “the making of the people,” as the pecu-liar idiom of National Socialism put it.

      entbürgerlichung - purging bourgeois elements

      verkameradshaftung - comradeship

      volkwerdung - the making of the people

    2. on 30 January 1939, Hitler prophesied “the annihilation ofthe Jewish race in Europe” in the event that “international financeJewry” succeeded in “plunging the nations once more into a worldwar.”
    3. German legal com-mentators reassured the German public by citing U.S. programs asprecedents and quoting Oliver Wendell Holmes’s 1927 opinion,“three generations of imbeciles are enough”
    4. “In the language used by both the Nazis and the sci-entists, this policy was called ‘Aufartung durch Ausmerzung,’”improvement through exclusion.

      Aufartung durch Ausmerzung - improvement through exclusion.

    5. With the massive expansion of the Hitler Youthto include girls as well as boys, more than 765,000 young peoplehad the opportunity to serve in leadership roles. Many advancedin the ranks and received formal training and ideological instruc-tion in national academies such as the Reich Leadership School inPotsdam.
    6. The consciousness of generation, and the assumption thatold needed to be replaced with new, undoubtedly opened youngminds to the tenets of racial hygiene, which were repeatedly parsedin workshops and lectures.
    7. Nazi pedagogues extolled das Lager, “the camp,”as the privileged place where the “new generation was finding itsform.”

      das lager - the training community camps for german children

    8. What was necessary, he insisted, was to“recognize yourself” (“Erkenne dich selbst”), which meant identi-fying with the idealized portraits of new Germans and following thetenets of hereditary biology to find a suitable partner for marriage,to marry only for love, and to provide the Volk with healthy chil-dren.
    9. In November in Weimar, he promised that “if to-day there are still people in Germany who say: ‘We are not goingjoin your community, but stay just as we always have been,’ then Isay: ‘You will die off, but after you there will a young generationthat doesn’t know anything else!’”

      brah

    10. he Germanpopulation was being resorted according to supposed genetic val-ues, a project that required all Germans to reexamine their rela-tives, friends, and neighbors.
    11. In place of the quarrels of party, the contests of inter-est, and the divisions of class, which they believed compromised theability of the nation to act, the Nazis proposed to build a unified ra-cial community guided by modern science. Such an endeavor wouldprovide Germany with the “unity of action” necessary to surviveand prosper in the dangerous conditions of the twentieth century
    12. In other words, biology appeared to provideGermany with highly useful technologies of renovation. The Na-zis regarded racism as a scientifically grounded, self-consciouslymodern form of political organization.
    13. thousands of“ethnocrats” and other professionals mobilized to build the newbiomedical structures of the Third Reich. They oriented their ca-reers and ambitions toward the wide spaces that Nazi Germany’sracial vision had opened up.
    14. He believed Germans feltthat “it’s just us now” when they lived without Jews. “Just us” alsoexpressed the closed circle in which Germans could see and experi-ence “ourselves” as “we are” and as “we have become.”
    15. In what it touted as the triumph of “socialism ofthe deed” over “private capitalism” and “economic liberalism,” in1933 the Propaganda Ministry pressed a consortium of radio man-ufacturers to design and produce a Volksempfänger, or “people’sradio,” for the mass market.
    16. Germans even went to warwith preprinted diaries that left space for snapshots. All this was anacknowledgment of the desire to be part of and to share the Ger-man history that was being made.
    17. but even then nothing made the “com-munity of fate” more compelling than “the conviction that therewill no longer be future for Germany after a lost war.”

      sunk-cost fallacy-- they put so much investment into this, they can't back out

    18. But when the German cheers wouldnot stop, “Hitler sensed a popular mood, a longing for peace andreconciliation.” This was also an indication of the general content-ment with things as they were.
    19. crowds acclaimed the reestablishment of amass conscription army, the Wehrmacht, recalling for observers the“August Days” of 1914. Again socialists conceded: “For the over-whelming majority, 16 March is the definitive end to a shamefulpast, much more so than 30 January 1933; the day marks ‘the dawnof a new age.’” All this patriotic hoopla mattered; Versailles hadleft deep wounds, and, anyway, Germans were apt to be “childishlyproud of their army.”
    20. heexplained in tears that her two sons had fallen in battle and the bal-lot had been their voice. 61The text precisely captures the way many people thought of Ger-many: as the tenacious underdog finally asserting its rights.
    21. “its touristic spectaclesencouraged its participants to see a cause-and-effect relationshipbetween their own well being and the Nazi regime’s attempts to re-make Germans into the master race.”
    22. “People looked to Nazism as a great and radical sur-gery or cleansing” and therefore saw “the movement as a sourceof rejuvenation” in public life.
    23. hile“Strength through Joy” vacations were budget affairs, third-classrailway journeys to Thüringen rather than Bavaria, and parsimo-nious meals at second-rate hotels, they offered millions of Ger-mans the opportunity to travel, to see the seaside, or visit theReichshauptstadt—Berlin was one of the favorite “Strengththrough Joy” destinations.

      giving people who had never had the opportunity to travel-- of course theyre gonna support your regime if it gives them perks. for all accounts this seems like a great deal for germans if you discount the ethnic cleansing happening in the bg

    24. The dreamof the Volkswagen seemed to promise “a new, happier age” thatwould make “the German people rich and Germany beautiful,” asHitler put it. Indeed, the Volkswagen functioned as a symbol for thenewly won capacity to dream about the future: in this fundamentalsense, the Nazis appeared as “men of the future.”
    25. Mem-ories of the Third Reich corresponded in large part to the Nazis’own prewar media representation of “good times” both now and tocome.

      consider the mobilization of memory in propaganda

    26. the reports indicate that “workers not only wereunfree . . . but that most of them felt they were unfree, exploited,discriminated against and the victims of an unfair, class-ridden soci-ety.” Even during the boom years of 1937–39, “signs indicated thatNazism was further losing ground among workers.”

      counter to the argument made in the chapter, many workers under the nazi regime did not feel as though enough progress was being made

    27. On the eve of the war, in 1939, most Germans ex-perienced the Third Reich as a cherished period of economic andpolitical stability. These were achievements that the population wasdetermined to hold on to.
    28. The Day of Potsdam and May Day indi-cated that there was considerable desire among Germans to partici-pate in rituals of national renewal
    29. these auxiliary organiza-tions gave Germans semiofficial responsibilities as they collecteddonations, distributed coal, or trained as air-raid wardens.

      ordinary civilians take on leadership positions -- social mobility, chances to move up the ladder. even if not personally aligned w nazi ideology, pretty good choice to work under them in order to boost your standing. plus boosts patriotism

    30. Themedicalization of politics pulled thousands of new professionalsinto state service as nurses, teachers, health-care administrators.Newly opened public-health offices dotted the cities and country-side, building on the social-welfare accomplishments of the repub-lic.
    31. a“Machbarkeitswahn,” modernity’s heady sense of the possible thatepitomized National Socialism as it charged into the future.

      machbarkeitswahn - the possibility of achieving something / making change

    32. Evenbefore Hitler spoke (8:00 p.m.), the choreography of May Day hadfastened the links between workers and the nation, between ma-chinists and machine-age dreams, between technical mastery andnational prowess
    33. “Something had to be done”—these were the simple, conclusive words voiced by a friend of KarlDürkefälden’s, jobless and a new convert to Nazism. His wordswere echoed by thousands of workers in the winter and springof 1933; though a socialist, Karl himself understood—“it’s truetoo,” he added parenthetically in his diary entry.
    34. Socialists around the worldhad celebrated May Day as a festival of labor since the 1880s; butin Germany they had failed to get the official recognition the Nazisnow offered. So strong were the hopes for national unity that theGerman Free Trade Unions welcomed the Nazi gesture and encour-aged members to participate in the celebrations.
    35. National Socialism offered acomprehensive vision of renewal, which many Germans found ap-pealing, but they combined it with the alarming specter of nationaldisintegration.
    36. He repeatedly described Ger-many as a nation that had come home to itself. While Erich hatedthe Nazis, he loved the Third Reich.
    37. the desire to be part ofnational unity was so strong that it pulled even an anti-Nazi such asErich into the new political community
    1. Eine Empfehlung des Zusammenschlusses nationaler Akademien der Wissenschaften und eine zusammenfassende Studie zum globalen Plastiksystem empfehlen die Reduktion des Verbrauchs um 50% und eine Reihe weiterer Schritte wie das fast vollständige Recycling von Plastik und die Produktion aus Biomaterialien. Anlass sind die Verhandlungen zum internationalen Plastikabkommen. Plastikproduktion und Verbrauch führen schon jetzt – abgesehen von zahlreichen anderen negativen Folgen – zu Emissionen von ca einer Gigatonne CO2 im Jahr. Ohne drastische Änderungen wird sich diese Menge vervielfachen. https://www.derstandard.de/story/3000000205422/wissenschaft-fordert-radikale-abkehr-von-herkoemmlicher-plastikproduktion

      Studie: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-023-06939-z.epdf?sharing_token=-UPbgMcUGHbtK4Uscd0XZdRgN0jAjWel9jnR3ZoTv0MMo2Wo13ejTIFhNPD522LiogzEIVWxfHy01bK9MbFLdv59qFdQ73NDNguF2Bf0icTMUsLgWI2hE3OyG7VDGuf_3LODlHS0WEkABpLs5LAtVCiW0_JyVU7n_UL0EP7LiRS0q6s0fIpcIjaEfVFyDe4cez-4KdfAAphy-2weBUevmIZv9sURtFCEk7-LtaOTCmM%3D&tracking_referrer=www.derstandard.de

    1. Your zettelkasten, having a perfect memory of your "past self" acts as a ratchet so that when you have a new conversation on a particular topic, your "present self" can quickly remember where you left off and not only advance the arguments but leave an associative trail for your "future self" to continue on again later.

      Many thoughts and associations occur when you're having conversations with any text, whether it's with something you're reading by another author or your own notes in your zettelkasten or commonplace book. For more conversations on this topic, perhaps thumb through: https://hypothes.is/users/chrisaldrich?q=tag%3A%27conversations+with+the+text%27

      If you view conversations broadly as means of finding and collecting information from external sources and naturally associating them together, perhaps you'll appreciate this quote:

      No piece of information is superior to any other. Power lies in having them all on file and then finding the connections. There are always connections; you have only to want to find them.—Umberto Eco in Foucault's Pendulum (Secker & Warburg)

      (Reply to u/u/Plastic-Lettuce-7150 at https://www.reddit.com/r/Zettelkasten/comments/1ae2qf4/communicating_with_a_zettelkasten/)

  3. Jan 2024
    1. by far the most illuminating to me is the idea that mental causation works from virtual futures towards the past 00:33:17 whereas physical causation works from the past towards the future and these two streams of causation sort of overlap in the present

      for - comparison - mental vs physical causation - adjacency - Michael Levin's definition of intelligence - Sheldrake's mental vs physical causation

      key insight - comparison - mental vs physical causation - mental causation works from virtual futures to past - physical causation works from past to future - this is an interesting way of seeing things

      adjacency - between - direction of mental vs physical causation - Michael Levin's definition of intelligence (adopting WIlliam James's idea) and cognition and cognitive light cones of living organisms:: - having a goal - having autonomy and agency to reach that goal - adjacency statement - Levin adopts a definition of cognition from scientific predecessors that relate to goal activity. - When an organism chooses one specific behavioral trajectory over all other possible ones in order to reach a goal - this is none other than choosing a virtual future that projects back to the present - In our species, innovation and design is based on this future-to-present backwards projection

    1. Searching as exploration. White and Roth [71 ,p.38] define exploratory search as a “sense making activity focusedon the gathering and use of information to foster intellectual de-velopment.” Users who conduct exploratory searches are generallyunfamiliar with the domain of their goals, and unsure about howto achieve them [ 71]. Many scholars have investigated the mainfactors relating to this type of dynamic task, such as uncertainty,creativity, innovation, knowledge discovery, serendipity, conver-gence of ideas, learning, and investigation [2, 46, 71].These factors are not always expressed or evident in queriesor questions posed by a searcher to a search system.

      Sometimes, search is not rooted in discovery of a correct answer to a question. It's about exploration. Serendipity through search. Think Michael Lewis, Malcolm Gladwell, and Latif Nasser from Radiolab. The randomizer on wikipedia. A risk factor of where things trend with advanced AI in search is an abandonment of meaning making through exploration in favor of a knowledge-level pursuit that lacks comparable depth to more exploratory experiences.

  4. Dec 2023
      • for: plan B, climate futures, dystopian future, civilization collapse

      • title: If We’ve Lost the Climate War, What’s Plan B?

      • subtitle: Why a carbon tax won’t save us, and what’s next.
      • author: Crawford Kilian
      • date: Nov 22, 2023

      • summary

        • a good article that shows the complexity and unpredictability of a collapse scenario and system justification theory, which sounds like the boiling frog syndrome
  5. Nov 2023
    1. what worries me is again the the long-term future of the economy in a carbon constrained world 00:27:32 and as a futurist uh what what is your perspective on on the the role of oil going into 2050
      • for: carbon budget - Alberta, carbon-constrained world - Alberta's future
    1. Eine neue Studie ergibt, dass sich das Abschmelzen des westantarktischen Eisschilds selbst dann fortsetzen wird, wenn die Erderhitzung auf 1,5° begrenzt wird. Das Schelfeis stellt ein Kipppelememt dar. Der Abschmelzvorgang verstärkt sich selbst und führt zu einer unaufhaltsamen Erhöhung des Meeresspiegels, weil er den Weg für das hinter dem Schelfeis gelegene Gletschereis frei macht. https://www.derstandard.at/story/3000000192327/meterhoher-meeresanstieg-durch-abschmelzen-des-westantarktischen-eisschelfs

      Studie: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41558-023-01818-x

      Mehr zur Studie: https://hypothes.is/search?q=tag%3A%27report%3A+Unavoidable+future+increase+in+West+Antarctic+ice-shelf+melting%27

    1. Der westantarktische Eisschild wird in diesem Jahrhundert dreimal schneller abschmelzen als im vergangenen, selbst wenn es gelingt, die globale Erhitzung auf 1,5 Grad zu begrenzen. Einer neuen Studie zufolge wurde einer der Kipppunkte, unterhalb derer das Klimasystem stabil bleibt, überschritten. Dadurch wird es zu einem so großen Anstieg des Meeresspiegels kommen, dass mehrere Küstenstädte aufgegeben werden müssen. Die Studie stützt sich nur auf eine einzige Modellierung, wird aber von den Ergebnissen anderer Untersuchungen ergänzt. https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2023/oct/23/rapid-ice-melt-in-west-antarctica-now-inevitable-research-shows

      Studie: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41558-023-01818-x

      • for: future cities - Africa, CommuniTgrow, urban planning - Africa, African cities, futures - African cities, 2 Billion Strong, Gita Govin, Richard Rubin, Alistair Rendall

      • title:

        • 2 Billion Strong
          • A Regenerative Solution to Building Sustainable African Cities
      • author
        • Gita Govin
        • Richard Rubin
        • Alistair Rendall
      • date: 2012
      • summary
        • This book outlines the vision from sustainable architectural firm CommuniTGrow for a template for a future sustainable African city. The first project launching in 2024 is the Milkwood Development in Cape Town:
    1. I use expiration dates and refrigerators to make a point about #AI and over-reliance, and @dajb uses ducks. #nailingit @weareopencoop

      —epilepticrabbit @epilepticrabbit@social.coop on Nov 09, 2023, 11:51 at https://mastodon.social/@epilepticrabbit@social.coop/111382329524902140

    1. Die englische Regierung hat in der letzten Oktoberwoche 27 Lizenzen zur Öl- und Gasförderung in der Nordsee vergeben. George Monbiot konfrontiert diese Entscheidung mit aktuellen Erkenntnissen zum sechsten Massenaussterben und dem drohenden Zusammenbruch lebensunterstützender Systeme des Planeten https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2023/oct/31/flickering-earth-systems-warning-act-now-rishi-sunak-north-sea

    1. George Monbiot zur Entscheidung Sunaks, die Öl- und Gasproduktion in der Nordsee zu maximieren. Er spricht vom pollution paradox: Die Firmen, die dem Planeten am meisten schaden, haben die triftigsten Gründe, in Politik und Desinformation zu investieren. Indiz für Desinformation sei der Rückgriff auf CCS. Die Konservativen erhalten große Spenden von der Fossilindustrie. Sunak hat verschuldet, dass der CO<sub>2</sub>-Preis in Uk nur noch halb so hoch ist wie in der EU. https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2023/aug/01/rishi-sunak-north-sea-planet-climate-crisis-plutocrats

    1. 16:00 "our grass is a solar panel"<br /> hell yeah. fuck these "made in china" hightech bullshit solar panels.<br /> future energy is based on wood gas, and synthetic diesel made from wood gas.<br /> but the depopulation agenda has priority...

    1. sumption of decreasing virulence with time is a double-edged sword in NativeAmerican disease history. Recent Native Americans have extreme susceptibility to oftenacute infections such as influenza and tuberculosis (Indian Health Service 1999; Koenig1921; Matthews 1886). Although, as detailed later in this paper, many factors, includingsocio-economic conditions, diet, and other concurrent infections, could be contributing tothis incidence, these factors seem to pale by comparison with disease history. Essentially,current incidence rates account for the absence of crowd infections prior to Columbus andabsence explains the present incidence rate

      .

    2. se diseases, once introduced, severelywinnowed Native American populations.

      .

    3. Since the mid-twentieth century it has been widely accepted that Old World populationsintroduced infectious diseases to Native Americans beginning with the Columbianvoyages of AD 149

      .

    1. How to Apply the SAMR Model with Ruben Puentedura, 2016. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZQTx2UQQvbU.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZQTx2UQQvbU

      Enhancement:<br /> - Substitution: Tech acts as a direct tool substitute with no functional improvement - Augmentation: Tech acts as a direct tool substitute with functional improvement

      Transformation - Modification: Tech allows for significant task redesign - Redefinition: Tech allows for the creation of new tasks, previously inconceivable

  6. Oct 2023
    1. https://shindig.com/login/event/shulman

      How intermediary organizations can help save higher education

    2. Envisioning the next wave of emergent AI

      Are we stretching too far by saying that AI are currently emergent? Isn't this like saying that card indexes of the early 20th century are computers. In reality they were data storage and the "computing" took place when humans did the actual data processing/thinking to come up with new results.

      Emergence would seem to actually be the point which comes about when the AI takes its own output and continues processing (successfully) on it.

  7. Sep 2023
    1. Hoekstra, a Shell man and a McKinsey man in charge of EU climate policy?
      • for: climate change policy hypocrisy, fossil fuel lobby, EU climate policy, Hoekstra, Fox guarding the henhouse, Linked In post
      • comment

        • What does it say about the EU's authenticity to deal with the global boiling crisis when they put a fox in charge of the henhouse?
        • this seems awfully similar to the choice for positioning an oil man to head COP28.
        • The fossil fuel lobby is EXTREMELY busy in the opaque back end of politics. We need more light to shine and bring the back end fossil fuel lobby activity out of the shadows to pre-empt future leadership betrayals.
      • future research

        • uncover future fossil fuel lobby’s game plan and future attempts to coopt climate change policy leadership
        • needed in order to proactively preempt the next attempt at coopting climate leadership. It’s difficult when we are simply reacting
    1. The dualism of scientific materialism and its one-person psychologies are arguably complicit in much of the psychological and social damage we are now recognising.
      • for: dualism, dualism - psychology, unintended consequences, unintended consequences - dualism in psychology, progress trap, progress trap - dualism in psychology

      • paraphrase

        • The dualism of scientific materialism gives rise to one-person psychologies
          • and are arguably complicit in much of the psychological and social damage we are now recognising.
        • For instance, a good deal of the historical denial of the role of psychological and social trauma has been traced
          • back to the Freudian model’s almost exclusive focus on the internal world;
            • the actual impact of others and society has been, as a result, relatively ignored.
        • Modern psychiatry, which accepts the same philosophical model but changes the level of explanation, is just as culpable.
        • Likewise CBT, with its focus on dysfunctional thought patterns and rational remedies administered from the outside, also follows the same misguided philosophy.
      • question

        • what are concrete ways this has caused harm?
      • future work
        • perform literature review on case studies where Winnicott's approach has been a more constructive therapeutic one
    1. R.U.R.: Rossum’s Universal Robots, drama in three acts by Karel Čapek, published in 1920 and performed in 1921. This cautionary play, for which Čapek invented the word robot (derived from the Czech word for forced labour), involves a scientist named Rossum who discovers the secret of creating humanlike machines. He establishes a factory to produce and distribute these mechanisms worldwide. Another scientist decides to make the robots more human, which he does by gradually adding such traits as the capacity to feel pain. Years later, the robots, who were created to serve humans, have come to dominate them completely.
  8. Aug 2023
    1. Ten minutes before sleep, do the following: PRAY

      It's a combination of visualization, commitment, and meditation

      Request the subconscious through this act of prayer.

      Also visualize the outcome and process of that which you aspire to do the following day, and even that which you want to achieve the following month(s). Thus, visualize the following: Big Picture, Milestones, and yourself the next day.

    1. We lived in a relatively unregulated digital world until now. It was great until the public realized that a few companies wield too much power today in our lives. We will see significant changes in areas like privacy, data protection, algorithm and architecture design guidelines, and platform accountability, etc. which should reduce the pervasiveness of misinformation, hate and visceral content over the internet.
      • for: quote, quote - Prateek Raj, quote - internet regulation, quote - reducing misinformation, fake news, indyweb - support
      • quote
        • We lived in a relatively unregulated digital world until now.
        • It was great until the public realized that a few companies wield too much power today in our lives.
        • We will see significant changes in areas like
          • privacy,
          • data protection,
          • algorithm and
          • architecture design guidelines, and
          • platform accountability, etc.
        • which should reduce the pervasiveness of
          • misinformation,
          • hate and visceral content
        • over the internet.
        • These steps will also reduce the power wielded by digital giants.
        • Beyond these immediate effects, it is difficult to say if these social innovations will create a more participative and healthy society.
        • These broader effects are driven by deeper underlying factors, like
          • history,
          • diversity,
          • cohesiveness and
          • social capital, and also
          • political climate and
          • institutions.
        • In other words,
          • just as digital world is shaping the physical world,
          • physical world shapes our digital world as well.
      • author: Prateek Raj
        • assistant professor in strategy, Indian Institute of Management, Bangalore
    1. Technology’s greatest contribution to social and civic innovation in the next decade will be to provide accurate, user-friendly context and honest assessment of issues, problems and potential solutions
      • for: quote, quote - Barry Chudakov, quote - progress trap, progress trap, cultural evolution, technology - futures, futures - technology, progress trap, indyweb - support, future - education
      • quote
      • paraphrase
        • Technology’s greatest contribution to social and civic innovation in the next decade
        • will be to provide
          • accurate, user-friendly context and
          • honest assessment of
            • issues,
            • problems and
            • potential solutions / comment - indyweb /
        • We are facing greater accelerations of
          • climate change,
          • social mobility,
          • pollution,
          • immigration and
          • resource issues.
        • Our problems have gone from complicated to wicked.
        • We need
          • clear answers and
          • discussions that are
            • cogent,
            • relevant and
            • true to facts.
        • Technology must guard against becoming a platform to enable targeted chaos,
        • that is, using technology as a means to
          • obfuscate and
          • manipulate.
        • We are all now living in Sim City:
        • The digital world is showing us a sim,
          • or digital mirror,
        • of each aspect of reality.
        • The most successful social and civic innovation I expect to see by 2030
        • is a massive restructuring of our educational systems based on new and emerging mirror digital worlds. / comment: This bodes well for Indyweb for education/
        • We will then need to expand our information presentations to include
          • verifiable factfulness that ensures any digital presentation faithfully and
          • accurately matches the physical realities.
        • Just as medicine went from
          • bloodletting and leeches and lobotomies to
          • open-heart surgery and artificial limbs,
        • technology will begin to modernize information flows around core issues: urgent need, future implications, accurate assessment.
        • Technology can play a crucial role to move humanity
          • from blame fantasies
          • to focused attention and working solutions.”
    1. I do want to point out one more really significant implication here which is how it affects our experience of time
      • for: the lack project, sense of lack, the reality project, sense of self, sense of self and lack, poverty mentality, sense of time, living in the future, living in the present, human DOing, human BEing
      • key insight
        • we construct different types of experiences of time, depending on the degree of sense of lack we experience
        • it means the difference between
          • living in the present
          • living in the future
      • paraphrase
        • it's the nature of lack projects insofar as we become preoccupied with them
        • that they tend to be future oriented naturally
        • I mean the whole idea of a lack project or a reality project is right here right now is not good enough
          • because I feel this sense of inadequacy this sense of lack
          • but in the future when I have what I think I need
            • when I'm rich enough or
            • when I'm famous enough or
            • my body is perfect enough or whatever
          • when I have all this then everything will be okay
          • and what of course that does is that future orientation traps Us in linear time in a way that tends to devalue the way we experience the world and ourselves in the world right here and now
          • it treats the now as a means to some better ends
          • Now isn't good enough
            • but when I have what I think I need everything is going to be just great
        • So many of the spiritual Traditions taught
        • especially the mystics and the Zen Masters
        • they end up talking about what is sometimes called
          • the Eternal now
          • or the Eternal present - a different way of experiencing the now
        • As long as the present is a means to some better end
          • this future when I'm gonna be okay
        • then the present is experienced as
          • a series of Nows that fall away
          • as we reach for that future
        • but if we're not actually needing to get somewhere that's better in the future
        • it's possible to experience the here and now
          • as lacking nothing and myself in the here and now
          • as lacking nothing
      • it's possible to experience the present as something that doesn't arise and doesn't fall away
  9. Jul 2023
    1. We may havemade errors of selection.

      A great admission to make upfront in such a massive endeavor which one hopes to shape the future.

      What does this mean for ars excerpendi writ large? Particularly when it may apply to hundreds of thousands?

  10. Jun 2023
    1. https://web.archive.org/web/20230613121025/https://www.workfutures.io/p/note-what-do-we-do-when-we-cant-predict

      Stowe says the 'unpredictability' e.g. investors see comes down that there's no way to assess risk in the global network created complexity. Points to older piece on uncertainty risk and ambiguity. https://www.sunsama.com/blog/uncertainty-risk-and-ambiguity explore.

      I would say that in complexity you don't try to predict the future, as that is based on linear causal chains of the knowable an known realms, you try to probe the future, running multiple small probes (some contradictory) and feed those that yield results.

  11. May 2023
    1. This visualisation technique can be used for small and big decisions alike. Thinking of eating that extra piece of cake? Walk yourself through the likely thoughts of your future self. Want to spend a large sum of money on a piece of tech you’re not sure yet how you will use? Think about how your future self will feel about the decision

      Note that these are examples that imply that using regret of future self in decision making is mostly for deciding against a certain action (eat cake, buy new toy).

    2. Instead of letting your present self make the decision on their own, ignoring the experience of your future self who will need to deal with the consequences later, turn the one-way decision process into a conversation between your present and future self.

      As part of decision making involve a 'future self' so that different perspective(s) can get taken into account in a personal decision on an action.

    3. Bring your future self in the decision-making process

      Vgl Vinay Gupta's [[Verantwoording aan de kinderen 20200616102016]] as a way of including future selves, by tying consequence evalution to the human rights of children.

    4. In-the-moment decisions have a compound effect: while each of them doesn’t feel like a big deal, they add up overtime.

      Compounding plays a role in any current decision. Vgl [[Compound interest van implementatie en adoptie 20210216134309]] [[Compound interest of habits 20200916065059]]

    5. temporal discounting. The further in the future the consequences, the least we pay attention to them

      Temporal discounting: future consequences are taken into account as an inverse of time. It's based on urgency as a survival trait.

  12. Apr 2023
    1. For many people, “Camelot” is more familiar as a metaphor than as a musical — it depicts a noble effort to create a just society, often associated with the Kennedy administration, because Jacqueline Kennedy, in an interview shortly after President John F. Kennedy’s assassination, mentioned her husband’s fondness for the show, and quoted a final lyric: “Don’t let it be forgot, that once there was a spot, for one brief shining moment, that was known as Camelot.”

      The Kennedy administration became culturally associated with Camelot because Jacqueline Kennedy mentioned her husband's affinity for the show in an interview with Theodore H. White for LIFE Magazine following his death and quoted the show's closing lyric: “Don’t let it be forgot, that once there was a spot, for one brief shining moment, that was known as Camelot.”


      Somewhat curious that there's T. H. White of The Once and Future King and a separate Theodore H. White who interviewed Jackie Kennedy following her husband's death with mentions of Camelot.

  13. Mar 2023
    1. Figure 2. Transitions of climate change throughout time.

      // - This is a good basic framing - for future basic research - on progress traps - Future paper would explore details in a much more granular way //

  14. Feb 2023
    1. I find it very tiring haha. As I said in another comment, processing a single chapter can take me a full day or two. However, I keep reminding myself that I would rather spend a day processing a chapter well, and have literature notes to serve me a lifetime (potentially, at least), rather than reading a chapter in two hours and not remember a single thing the next day. When I REALLY need a reminder of this, I just look at my "Backlog" folder which contains old "notes" that are now pretty much useless: I didn't use a reference manager consistently during my first two years of PhD so there are a lot of citations which are unreliable; I didn't really summarise texts, I only read them and highlighted; I didn't use the cloud for a long time, so I lost a lot of notes; and I didn't have Obsidian, so a lot of my notes are just contained within the context of the place I read them, rather than being connected. Seeing three years worth of useless materials, and knowing that I read a couple hundred of articles/chapters but I have nothing to show for it, that makes me more patient when writing my literature notes now. However I also find it very exciting that I can future-proof some of my notes. I feel like I'm working for my future self.

      A partial answer to note taking why.

    1. two social drivers actively impair global efforts to achieve 1.5 C. Those are corporate responses and global consumption patterns
      • two major social drivers prevent achieving 1.5 C.
        • corporate responses
        • global consumption patterns
    2. Most of them are, in general, moving in the right direction. They just aren’t aggressive enough yet to be consistent with the kind of transformative social change required to achieve the 1.5 C target.
      • climate change actions
      • Most of the climate actions are moving in the right direction.
      • but they just aren’t aggressive enough yet to achieve the 1.5 C target.
      • right direction, wrong speed
  15. Jan 2023
    1. the only way to stop the crime of Crisis is put an end to oil and coal consumption and zero emissions that's what science 00:50:35 is telling us and this means that Capital linked to oil coals and gas should lose its value

      !- fossil fuel value : science tells us that it needs to stop to zero