390 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2024
    1. pervasive

      something is present or noticeable in every part of a thing or place

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  2. Jan 2024
  3. Dec 2023
    1. However, Google Docs has several limitations (like not automatically doing sequentially number headings - a plugin to do this available but is buggy) so I would like to do the final polishing in Word

      google docs vs word in context of zotero

      I am working on a chapter collaboratively in Google Docs and the Zotero plugin worked like a charm for this

  4. Nov 2023
    1. logIntoMicrosoft

      I think logInToMicrosoft would be slightly better, but this is surely much better than the completely incorrect loginToMicrosoft

    2. loginTo

      Incorrect. Should be logInTo or logInto, same as it is in the other functions, logIntoMicrosoft, ...

  5. Oct 2023
    1. The RWC was developed by The Language Conservancy (TLC), an NGO dedicated to protecting around 50 Indigenous languages around the world, in order to churn out such dictionaries at super-speed. TLC, which has a $3 million budget, regularly teams up linguists with Native American language teachers to work on these dictionaries.
    2. The women are working with Rapid Word Collection (RWC) software, which uses an algorithm to search Apache text and audio databases for so-called forgotten words.
    1. My earliest teachers were those who walked and continue to walk beside me, who learn alongside me. In this way, my poetic lineage is situated not in the before, in the sense of being in the past. Instead, the poets I come from, are before me in the sense of being right in front of me, returning my gaze, answering my questions and asking their own.

      This is community. This is what academic and creative life can be. How can groups hold themselves accountable to openness, transparency, and hospitality?

    1. transitive verb

      It's hard for me to see the difference between the transitive and intransitive forms of this verb.

      Is that the transitive form can/must be used with a noun following it, like "presume something", while the intransitive form cannot be followed by a noun, but can (and often is) followed by a prepositional phrase, "presume that something"? Pretty subtle difference, but I guess it's there...

    1. as a native speaker I'd probably tend to refer to his drug dependency, but his dependence on drugs (maybe because I see one as a problem he has, and the other as something he's doing, I don't know).
    2. And as others have pointed out, there is potential for ambiguity: if A is dependent on B, then a dependence or dependency (relationship) exists; but referring to either A or B as the dependency demands context.

      "demands context" :)

    3. There are certainly cases where you can use dependency and cannot use dependence: for example "The UK's overseas dependencies", or "This software releases has dependencies on Unix and Java". So if the dependent things are discrete and countable, it should definitely be "dependency".
  6. Sep 2023
    1. I wonder what you think of a distinction between the more traditional 'scholar's box', and the proto-databases that were used to write dictionaries and then for projects such as the Mundaneum. I can't help feeling there's a significant difference between a collection of notes meant for a single person, and a collection meant to be used collaboratively. But not sure exactly how to characterize this difference. Seems to me that there's a tradition that ended up with the word processor, and another one that ended up with the database. I feel that the word processor, unlike the database, was a dead end.

      reply to u/atomicnotes at https://www.reddit.com/r/Zettelkasten/comments/16njtfx/comment/k1tuc9c/?utm_source=reddit&utm_medium=web2x&context=3

      u/atomicnotes, this is an excellent question. (Though I'd still like to come to terms with people who don't think it acts as a knowledge management system, there's obviously something I'm missing.)

      Some of your distinction comes down to how one is using their zettelkasten and what sorts of questions are being asked of it. One of the earliest descriptions I've seen that begins to get at the difference is the description by Beatrice Webb of her notes (appendix C) in My Apprenticeship. As she describes what she's doing, I get the feeling that she's taking the same broad sort of notes we're all used to, but it's obvious from her discussion that she's also using her slips as a traditional database, but is lacking modern vocabulary to describe it as such.

      Early efforts like the OED, TLL, the Wb, and even Gertrud Bauer's Coptic linguistic zettelkasten of the late 1970s were narrow enough in scope and data collected to make them almost dead simple to define, organize and use as databases on paper. Of course how they were used to compile their ultimate reference books was a bit more complex in form than the basic data from which they stemmed.

      The Mundaneum had a much more complex flavor because it required a standardized system for everyone to work in concert against much more freeform as well as more complex forms of collected data and still be able to search for the answers to specific questions. While still somewhat database flavored, it was dramatically different from the others because of it scope and the much broader sorts of questions one could ask of it. I think that if you ask yourself what sorts of affordances you get from the two different groups (databases and word processors (or even their typewriter precursors) you find even more answers.

      Typewriters and word processors allowed one to get words down on paper quicker by a magnitude of order or two faster, and in combination with reproduction equipment, made it easier to spin off copies of the document for small scale and local mass distribution a lot easier. They do allow a few affordances like higher readability (compared with less standardized and slower handwriting), quick search (at least in the digital era), and moving pieces of text around (also in digital). Much beyond this, they aren't tremendously helpful as a composition tool. As a thinking tool, typewriters and word processors aren't significantly better than their analog predecessors, so you don't gain a huge amount of leverage by using them.

      On the other hand, databases and their spreadsheet brethren offer a lot more, particularly in digital realms. Data collection and collation become much easier. One can also form a massive variety of queries on such collected data, not to mention making calculations on those data or subjecting them to statistical analyses. Searching, sorting, and making direct comparisons also become far easier and quicker to do once you've amassed the data you need. Here again, Beatrice Webb's early experience and descriptions are very helpful as are Hollerinth's early work with punch cards and census data and the speed with which the results could be used.

      Now if you compare the affordances by each of these in the digital era and plot their shifts against increasing computer processing power, you'll see that the value of the word processor stays relatively flat while the database shows much more significant movement.

      Surely there is a lot more at play, particularly at scale and when taking network effects into account, but perhaps this quick sketch may explain to you a bit of the difference you've described.

      Another difference you may be seeing/feeling is that of contextualization. Databases usually have much smaller and more discrete amounts of data cross-indexed (for example: a subject's name versus weight with a value in pounds or kilograms.) As a result the amount of context required to use them is dramatically lower compared to the sorts of data you might keep in an average atomic/evergreen note, which may need to be more heavily recontextualized for you when you need to use it in conjunction with other similar notes which may also need you to recontextualize them and then use them against or with one another.

      Some of this is why the cards in the Thesaurus Linguae Latinae are easier to use and understand out of the box (presuming you know Latin) than those you might find in the Mundaneum. They'll also be far easier to use than a stranger's notes which will require even larger contextualization for you, especially when you haven't spent the time scaffolding the related and often unstated knowledge around them. This is why others' zettelkasten will be more difficult (but not wholly impossible) for a stranger to use. You might apply the analogy of context gaps between children and adults for a typical Disney animated movie to the situation. If you're using someone else's zettelkasten, you'll potentially be able to follow a base level story the way a child would view a Disney cartoon. Compare this to the zettelkasten's creator who will not only see that same story, but will have a much higher level of associative memory at play to see and understand a huge level of in-jokes, cultural references, and other associations that an adult watching the Disney movie will understand that the child would completely miss.

      I'm curious to hear your thoughts on how this all plays out for your way of conceptualizing it.

    1. "Surrendering" by Ocean Vuong

      1. He moved into United State when he was age of five. He first came to United State when he started kindergarten. Seven of them live in the apartment one bedroom and bathroom to share the whole. He learned ABC song and alphabet. He knows the ABC that he forgot the letter is M comes before N.

      2. He went to the library since he was on the recess. He was in the library hiding from the bully. The bully just came in the library doing the slight frame and soft voice in front of the kid where he sit. He left the library, he walked to the middle of the schoolyard started calling him the pansy and fairy. He knows the American flag that he recognize on the microphone against the backdrop.

    1. I'd suggest that you play around a little bit with a vanilla app. Create a brand new app without any additional files, just what rails new generates. See how bin/rails runner Models raises an error because there is no models directory in autoload_paths. Now, put config.autoload_paths += %W(#{config.root}/app) in config/application.rb and observe how bin/rails runner Models just returns a prompt. With the confidence of having that running, then transalate to your app.
  7. Aug 2023
    1. If there’s only an asterisk: Click the style name, then move the pointer over the style name in the Paragraph Styles pop-up menu. Click the arrow that appears, then choose Redefine from Selection.

      Pages is so much more impressive than you'd expect in so many ways, but damn...

      The way styles are handled still perplexes the shit out of me... even after consuming this document.

  8. Jun 2023
  9. May 2023
    1. The texts used in reading instruction shifted from predictable books to phonetically regular texts that were referred to by the publisher as “predictable” and “decodable,” but that actually consisted of phonetically regular words organized into sentences that strain young readers’ sense-making.

      This sounds similar to the use of the Dolch word list to teach reading / writing. The list is designed to enable work with grammar and syntax, but because it is so small, requires considerable linguistic skill to use expressively.

  10. Apr 2023
    1. consumes more CPU and memory to simplify the logic and improve reliability.

      Candid! I propose that this interpretation of "Modern" receive widespread recognition.

    1. ut also the estimated organic search traffic that a webpage can receive by ranking for various related keywords. In other words, it considers the cumulative search traffic a page can get by ranking for multiple keywords, not just the primary one you're targeting.

      cumulative

    1. His eyeswere tearful and such as are found in impure boys of thirteen or fourteen

      Wording; Impure. They do not yet know how to perform.

  11. Mar 2023
    1. Dass das ägyptische Wort p.t (sprich: pet) "Himmel" bedeutet, lernt jeder Ägyptologiestudent im ersten Semester. Die Belegsammlung im Archiv des Wörterbuches umfaßt ca. 6.000 Belegzettel. In der Ordnung dieses Materials erfährt man nun, dass der ägyptische Himmel Tore und Wege hat, Gewässer und Ufer, Seiten, Stützen und Kapellen. Damit wird greifbar, dass der Ägypter bei dem Wort "Himmel" an etwas vollkommen anderes dachte als der moderne westliche Mensch, an einen mythischen Raum nämlich, in dem Götter und Totengeister weilen. In der lexikographischen Auswertung eines so umfassenden Materials geht es also um weit mehr als darum, die Grundbedeutung eines banalen Wortes zu ermitteln. Hier entfaltet sich ein Ausschnitt des ägyptischen Weltbildes in seinem Reichtum und in seiner Fremdheit; und naturgemäß sind es gerade die häufigen Wörter, die Schlüsselbegriffe der pharaonischen Kultur bezeichnen. Das verbreitete Mißverständnis, das Häufige sei uninteressant, stellt die Dinge also gerade auf den Kopf.

      Google translation:

      Every Egyptology student learns in their first semester that the Egyptian word pt (pronounced pet) means "heaven". The collection of documents in the dictionary archive comprises around 6,000 document slips. In the order of this material one learns that the Egyptian heaven has gates and ways, waters and banks, sides, pillars and chapels. This makes it tangible that the Egyptians had something completely different in mind when they heard the word "heaven" than modern Westerners do, namely a mythical space in which gods and spirits of the dead dwell.

      This is a fantastic example of context creation for a dead language as well as for creating proper historical context.

    2. Die Auswertung solcher Materialmengen erwies sich als prekär, und im Falle der häufigsten Wörter, z.B. mancher Präpositionen (allein das Wort m "in" ist über 60.000 Mal belegt) oder elementarer Verben mußte man vor den Schwierigkeiten kapitulieren und das Material aussondern.

      The preposition m "in" appears more than 60,000 times in the corpus, a fact which becomes a bit overwhelming to analyze.

    3. Auch das grammatische Verhalten eines Wortes nach Flexion und Rektion ist der Sammlung vollständig zu entnehmen. Und schließlich und vor allen Dingen lag hier der Schlüssel zur Bestimmung der Wortbedeutungen. Statt jeweils ad hoc durch Konjekturen einzelne Textstellen spekulativ zu deuten (das Raten, von dem Erman endlich wegkommen wollte), erlaubte es der Vergleich der verschiedenen Zusammenhänge, in denen ein Wort vorkam, seine Bedeutung durch systematische Eingrenzug zu fixieren oder doch wenigstens anzunähern. Auch in dieser Hinsicht hat sich das Zettelarchiv im Sinne seines Erstellungszwecks hervorragend bewährt.

      The benefit of creating such a massive key word in context index for the Wörterbuch der ägyptischen Sprache meant that instead of using an ad hoc translation method (guessing based on limited non-cultural context) for a language, which was passingly familiar, but not their mother tongue, Adolph Erman and others could consult a multitude of contexts for individual words and their various forms to provide more global context for better translations.

      Other dictionaries like the Oxford English Dictionary attempt to help do this as well as provide the semantic shift of words over time because the examples used in creating the dictionary include historical examples from various contexts.

    4. Dem Konzept nach ist dies ein key word in context (KWIC) Index, ein Typus von Indices, wie sie heute immer noch als Grundoperation der Textdatenverarbeitung erzeugt werden.

      The method used for indexing the Wörterbuch der ägyptischen Sprache and the Thesaurus Linguae Latinae is now generally known as a key word in context (KWIC) index.

  12. Feb 2023
    1. Things were changing quickly.Eco’s methods of organizing and filing information werestill effective, but word processors and the Internet werebeginning to offer exciting alternatives to long-establishedresearch and writing techniques.

      Esparmer is correct that research and writing did change with the advent of word processors and the internet in the 1990s and early 2000s (p xi), but these were primarily changes to the front and the back of the process. Esparmer and far too many others seem to miss the difference in which affordances were shifting here. The note taking and organization portions still remained the same, so Eco's advice is still tremendously important. Even if one were to do long form notes in notebook format or in digital documents, they would profitably advised to still properly cross-index their notes or have them in a form that allows them to rearrange them most simply with respect to the structuring and creative processes.

      Losing the ability to move ideas around easily, restructure them, link them together and outline them was a tremendous blow in going from the old methods to the new digital ones.

      Did we accidentally become enamored of the new technologies and forget that their affordances didn't completely replace those of the old methods?

  13. Jan 2023
    1. For the time being, my writing app of choice is Ulysses, but plenty of others are available—even, heaven help you, Micros✽ft W✽rd.

      Multiple interesting things going on here with the use of "Micros✽ft W✽rd".

      He's simultaneously: - Voldemorting the phrase to some extent so that it doesn't show up easily or at all in digital search. - He's visually marring the phrase to show active dislike of the software and its general use - By using the symbols, he's effectively turning the word into a form of profanity the way many have used the top row of symbols on typewriters to indicate swear words in the 20th century. Examples: sh@t, dmn, he!!, or any set of four symbols like &%^ to generally indicate a "four letter word" as many profane words typically have four letters.

    1. She could see in the open square before her house the tops of trees that were all aquiver with the new spring life. The delicious breath of rain was in the air. In the street below a peddler was crying his wares. The notes of a distant song which some one was singing reached her faintly, and countless sparrows were twittering in the eaves.

      Why would Chopin use such a positive description for such a tragic scene? This description is a large contrast to what the character is feeling in this moment, but what is its intentions? This is worth further investigation.

  14. Dec 2022
  15. Nov 2022
    1. Run in WSL to return current total "word count": find /mnt/c/path/to/obsidian -type f -name "*.md" -exec cat '{}' \+ | wcThis will also count words in syntax - like the word "query" in an embedded query. In fact it probably counts anything separated by whitespace as separate words. But you could do some preprocessing between the cat and the wc if you like.

      Linux command for WSL to count all lines, words count, & character count. OP states at end -wc restricts to word count only

    1. “Broadly speaking, the shortwords are the best, and the old wordswhen short are best of all,” attestedformer British Prime Minister WinstonChurchill,
    2. “Usethe smallest word that does the job,”advised essayist and journalist E. B.White.20
  16. Oct 2022
    1. Doch ganz gleich, ob der Zettelkasten auf ein Buch, ein Werk oder auf eine Gedankenwolke mit wechselnder Niederschlagsneigung hinauslief - er ist stets mehr als das Ganze, dessen Teile er gesammelt hat. Denn es stecken stets noch andere Texte in ihm als diejenigen, die aus ihm hervorgegangen sind. Insofern wäre die Digitalisierung des einen oder anderen Zettelkastens ein Geschenk an die Wissenschaft.

      machine translation (Google):

      But regardless of whether the Zettelkasten resulted in a book, a work, or a thought cloud with varying degrees of precipitation - it is always more than the whole whose parts it has collected. Because there are always other texts in it than those that emerged from it.

      There's something romantic about the analogy of a zettelkasten with a thought cloud which may have varying degrees of precipitation.

      Link to other analogies: - ruminant machines - the disappointment of porn - others?

    1. https://ymlaenwelsh.com/2018/11/11/on-word-field-farming/

      Creating world fields (groups of words related to a particular area or field of knowledge) can be helpful for acquiring vocabulary in a new language. There's no research here to back up the claim, but it's an interesting word game and method for familiarize oneself with a small area and acquire new words related to an area or various related stem words.

  17. Sep 2022
    1. Crippled

      IS IT BECAUSE IT CHANGES WHERE WE PUT EMPHASIS

      So... line breaks change the emphasis and myster of poetry of each line (ie state of heightened anxiety) but also how we literally pronounce them out loud (what pitch we use)

    1. but

      Comparing how great he does walking over big dirt mounds and contrasting how he is not great dealing with walking on tall grass.

    2. But

      The purpose for "But" is to show the difference. This sentence means that the sleep can influence eating habits and weight.

  18. Aug 2022
    1. such as

      it's giving examples of a things that they should to do to extend sleep time.

    2. uch as cutting back on caffeine, reducing screen time and sticking to a regular bedtime each night.

      I agree that cutting back on caffeine, reducing screen time, and sticking to a regular bedtime each night helps a lot in adjusting your sleep that’s less than seven hours.

    1. Replace 'log' with 'clock'; do you think it should be "clockin" because you aren't "clocking" anything? Plus, if 'login' was a verb, you'd not be logging in, but logining. Eww. Or, you'd have just logined instead of logged in.
    2. I feel very happy about them indeed because they take me to the destinations they promise (they're all nouns). Login doesn't take me to my login, which makes me sad. It does take me to a place where I can log in, however.
    1. "you can verb any noun". :) Though, comparing "ssh into a workstation" to "login to host.com", where "log in" exists, it's a bit like saying "entrance the building" when "enter the building" already works
    2. Login is a noun, the same as breakup (suffer a breakup), backup (keep backups safe), spinoff (a Star Wars spinoff), makeup, letdown,
  19. Jul 2022
    1. the straw man fallacy

      I've come around to preferring the term "strawchild".

      • It de-genders the term (important for some people)
      • It evokes the imagery of the kind of loser* who is only willing to engage in battle with children and/or is perhaps prone to striking them
      • It conveniently sidesteps the cliche/fatigue associated with invocations of the term "strawman"

      * Is this aspect of "strawchild" an instance of failure to elevate the other (i.e. steelman/starman them)? Yes.

  20. Jun 2022
    1. From the classroom, to the street, to the Internet, Eric’s voice carried, and carried within it the possibility of a kind of education–amplified with digital technologies– that enables other human beings to become conscious, to become responsible, to learn.

      Sadly, we seem to have othered orality and cultural practices which don't fit into the Western literate cultural box. This prevents us from moving forward as a society and a diverse culture.

      In the 90's rap was culturally appropriated by some because of its perception as "cool" within the culture. Can this coolness be leveraged as a reintroduction of oral methods in our culture without the baggage of the appropriation? Can it be added to enhance the evolving third archive? As a legitimate teaching tool?

    1. The absence of Quick Note on the iPhone is a strange, glaring omission that’s baffling to me. I do research on every device, including the iPhone. In fact, I’d argue that the iPhone is the most important place to include Quick Note. That’s because, despite the ample screen of my iPhone 12 Pro Max, it’s still not the best place to read, making saving items for later with Quick Note more valuable there. However, my iPhone is still where I run across links and other material I want to save daily. I’d love to be able to drop links and blockquotes into Quick Note from my iPhone, so I could revisit the material later from the more comfortable reading environment of my iPad or Mac. Not having Quick Note on the iPhone is a significant blow to the feature’s utility.

      Considering how I've been publicly speaking and behaving (melodramatically, that is) - as someone who has returned to using my iPhone as my primary working device - this sort of oversight is precisely what I expected, actually, What I did not expect of Apple was to respond as early as the next numeric release to this omission.

      Running this very first build of iOS 16, I can indeed that Apple has thought of at least one original context for Quick Note creation, but obviously, it's quite hard to say at this point.

      Anywho/how, here's what it looks like at the moment.

      Quick Note implemented on iPhone as of iOS 16's very first available dev beta

  21. May 2022
    1. (I know calling it "a philosophy" is confusing, I'll search a better word)
    2. I recently stopped working on it to learn Solid

      Needs to be resurrected. "Autonomous Data" is a way better name (being both cooler and less subject to ambiguity) than either "Solid" or "zero data [application]".

  22. Apr 2022
    1. culprit

      罪魁祸首

    2. deflect

      使...转向

    3. oligarchy

      寡头政治

    4. exempted

      豁免;幸免

    5. It is noteworthy to

      值得注意的是..... noteworthy可以形象的理解成“值得标记出来” 意译为值得注意的事情

    6. hypocritically

      伪善的;假惺惺的

    7. military operations

      军事行动

    8. wantonly

      肆意

    9. successively

      逐个

    10. instiled

      逐渐入侵

    11. waged

      发动(战争)

    12. incidence

      发生率

    13. rampant

      泛滥的

    14. stint

      一段时间

    15. nukes

      核武器

    16. rioting

      骚乱

    17. hooliganism

      流氓行为

    18. grassroot

      草根,基层。 感觉这个意思好像也来自西方,挺形象的

    19. calibre

      质量;看上去有点高级

    20. delegates

      代表

    21. moron

      傻子;这里可能指拜登或者特朗普哈哈哈哈哈

    22. hold in high esteem

      怀着崇高的敬意

    23. hindrance

      阻碍;看上去挺高级的表达

    24. depicted

      描绘

    25. totalitarian

      集权主义的

    26. accorded

      给予

    27. was overcome with fear that

      被恐惧压倒 be overcome with 被....战胜 被恐惧战胜感觉是很形象化的表达,被恐惧压倒了

    28. modern shopping complexes

      现代购物中心; complex有复合体的意思,购物中心里各种各样的商铺都有,所以说复合体也很形象

    29. extensive

      广阔的

    30. per capita income

      人均收入

    31. push-backs

      回报

    32. humiliating

      羞辱的

    33. distortion

      歪曲

    34. hideous

      丑恶的

  23. Mar 2022
  24. Feb 2022
    1. Steven Johnson indicates that the word processor is a terrible tool for writing because it doesn't have usable affordances for building up longer pieces from one's notes or basic ideas.

      He discusses his specific workflow of note taking and keeping ideas in Scrivener where he arranges them into folders and outlines which then become the source of his writing.

      Different from the typical zettelkasten workflow, he's keeping his notes hierarchically organized in folders based on topic keywords and only later when creating a specific writing project making explicit links and orders between his notes to create longer pieces. It's here that his work diverges most dramatically to the zettelkasten method described by Sönke Ahrens.

  25. Jan 2022
    1. also

      also shows that cars and trucks also produce nitrogen oxide which knowns as NOx.

    2. But

      But shows difference, even if the weather warm up the air quality is still getting worse.

    3. For example

      For example shows that urban areas without the green spaces will increase dangerous heat to the island moreover planting trees will change the climate change.

    4. in addition,

      It shows that people who work outside may suffer from the illness.

    1. because

      Shows the effect of the pipeline have effected the climate of the environment.

    2. But

      But shows difference that even before the rollback only 1% of the federal projects went through intensive environment.

    1. the word “replace” is more suitable in this situation on account of coherence and the choice of word.

    Tags

    Annotators

  26. Dec 2021
    1. Word

      Capitalized this is a direct reference to Microsoft Word, but I can't help thinking of John 1 "In the beginning was the Word, and the Word was with God, and the Word was God." presumably as the first Word.

    1. slacken

      To diminish in strength. To become slow and less active.

    2. sharp north

      bitter cold of winter

      In some copies the 'north' is written 'frost.'

      It can also be interpreted as the sharp compass pointing north.

    3. hemispheres

      The eyes are the microcosm of the complete spherical sphere.

    4. declining west

      The direction of sunset (start of the cold night and time flow)

      Natural sign of direction.

    5. maps

      chart of the heavens

      In addition to sea and land exploration, astronomy was another interest of the intellectual of Donne's Era.

      Source: Redpath, The Songs and Sonnets of John Donne (1956)

    6. worlds

      Can be either interpreted as continents or celestial bodies.

    7. good-morrow

      good morning

    8. den

      A cave where wild animals live.

      Another expression to demean the immature pleasures the speaker and the addressee once enjoyed.

      Also, the imagery of cave connects to the Plato's allegory of the cave which is the inspirational basis for line 6 and 7.

    9. troth

      Truth

      It can also be interpreted as a marital oath, implying that the previous night they spent together is not an ordinary one but a wedding night. The plausible addressee of this poem is Donne's wife , Anne More.

    10. weaned

      To start feeding food other than mother's breast milk.

      The speaker is supposing that everything that him and his lover did before they met and loved was infantile and immature.

    11. snorted

      Snored

      It seems disrespectful to use a verb such as 'snored', which has lowly imagery, adjacent to a religious allusion. Maybe Donne was purposeful with this uncommon decision in order to diminish the power of religious interpretation and draw the readers' attention more onto the power of love itself.

    1. Thrice-blessèd they that master so their blood To undergo such maiden pilgrimage,

      The word "maiden" here is taken from the word "maid." According to the Oxford English Dictionary, "maid" refers to virgins, so "maiden pilgrimage" speaks to the virginal characteristic of nuns.

    2. maiden pilgrimage,

      The word "maiden" here is taken from the word "maid." According to the Oxford English Dictionary, "maid" refers to virgins, so "maiden pilgrimage" speaks to the virginal characteristic of nuns.

  27. Nov 2021
    1. I spend most of my day in iOS Notes app.

      Did I ever really find this man intelligent??? Things sincerely do make a lot more sense now. Such a specific lack of aspiration.

  28. Oct 2021
    1. trauma

      A deeply distressing or disturbing experience.

    2. toil

      work extremely hard or incessantly.

    3. and

      And is used to show addition. In this is sentence it is used to show that the US cities are not only ranked well-being for the way residents feel about living in their communities, health, finances, social ties it was also because their sense of purpose.

    1. allocation

      the action or process of allocating or distributing something.

    2. coalition

      an alliance for combined action, especially a temporary alliance of political parties forming a government or of states.