9 Matching Annotations
  1. Aug 2020
  2. Jun 2020
  3. May 2020
    1. The northern end of the park has typically seen less affluent neighbors and significantly less attention, but Central Park Conservancy is about to change that. Earlier this fall, the non-profit group announced a $150 million renovation that would improve the parkland, add a new boardwalk along the man-made lake known as Harlem Meer, and build a new recreation facility to replace the Lasker pool and skating rink, both of which date back to the 1960’s. (Side note: The Trump Organization has the concession to run the skating rink through 2021, by which time there may be someone else in the White House.) Construction is set to begin in 2021, and completion is estimated for 2024.
  4. Feb 2020
    1. International tourist arrivals in Asia and the Pacific 2010-2018, by region Published by Statista Research Department, Jan 15, 2020 Journeys to Asia are on the rise in recent years. For 2018, a total of 347.7 million international tourists were estimated to arrive in an Asian country. Most of them in the North-East region with about 169 million arrivals.     International tourism  According to the World Tourism Organization (UNWTO), about 16 percent of the world's population, or 1.2 billion tourists took a trip. The most popular destination for tourists is Europe with 670 million visitors or nearly 50 percent, followed by Asia-Pacific, North America and the Middle East. Tourism of city trips are booming. In the past few years, the number of visitors to the most visited cities in the world has increased steadily.   Tourism in Asia  The growth of tourist flows has been dramatic, especially in Asia. The most popular cities in 2017 with overnight visitors include many Asian cities in the top 20 : Bangkok (Thailand) ranked first, followed by Singapore, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia), Tokyo (Japan) and Seoul (Korea). This is primarily from neighbors visiting the other.  Read more International tourist arrivals in Asia and the Pacific from 2010 to 2018
  5. Oct 2018
  6. Oct 2017
    1. Or, as a soldier of a desert war wrote in last autumn’s New York Times, is our central task the task of learning how to die—not (as he put it) to die ‘as individuals, but as a civilization’ (Scranton, 2013), in the Anthropocene?

      I found this statement incredibly depressing yet profound. Depressing in the idea that our central task is learning how to die (really who wants to be that morbid and think like that) (potentially digital humanists?), yet profound, because the soldier is not talking about us as individuals, but as a human civilization, as a whole, as a group, as a collective.

  7. May 2017
  8. Mar 2016