165 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2021
    1. If it's behaviour that you can imagine needing to reuse among multiple components, or if it's something that you can imagine applying to an element inside an {#if ...} block (for example), then it probably belongs in an action. It it's something that 'belongs' to the component itself, rather than a specific element, then it's probably more of a lifecycle thing.
    2. The use:action method seems cleaner, but aside from that, are there any underlying differences between these two methods that would make one preferred over the other in certain situations?
    1. Popper for Svelte with actions, no wrapper components or component bindings required! Other Popper libraries for Svelte (including the official @popperjs/svelte library) use a wrapper component that takes the required DOM elements as props. Not only does this require multiple bind:this, you also have to pollute your script tag with multiple DOM references. We can do better with Svelte actions!
    1. The best place to let the developers know, and track those bugs is in the bug tracker. There are hundreds of forums online, all over the place in many languages. We can’t be expected to read all of them. Anyone with a launchpad ID (thus, anyone who has an account on this discourse instance) has the capability to file a bug. I’d strongly recommend doing so, for each specific issue. Taking just a few minutes to do that will help tremendously.
    2. When there are imperfections, we rely on users and our active community to tell us how the software is not working correctly, so we can fix it. The way we do that, and have done for 15 years now, is via bug reports. Discussion is great, but detailed bug reports are better for letting developers know what’s wrong.
  2. Dec 2020
    1. For safety reasons, certain pumps and sprayers cannot be returned to the store if opened.

      More likely: they don't want to deal with these returns because of risk to store and because they want to keep the money they made from the sale.

    1. Corker, K. S., Arnal, J., Bonfiglio, D. B. V., Curran, P. G., Chartier, C. R., Chopik, W. J., Guadagno, R., Kimbrough, A., Schmidt, K., & Wiggins, B. J. (2020). Many Labs 5: Registered Replication of Albarracín et al. (2008), Experiment 7. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/qzspr

  3. Nov 2020
    1. The best course of action is to discreetly arrange a one-to-one meeting, and sensitively explore how he’s feeling. It can be useful to write a wellness action plan together. This is a document in which the employee writes down information about the mental-health problems he’s experiencing, and what triggers exist in his workplace that contribute to these feelings. You can then draw up a strategy together for how to help him improve his mental health in the workplace, and make a list of actions that both of you can take to help get him back on track.

      A manager can sit down with the affected employee and write an wellness action plan. This will include:

      • Employee's mental health problems
      • Triggers within the workplace
      • A strategy to work together with employee to help them improve in the workplace.
      • A list of actions that can be done. e.g. Counseling, reduce working time, set limits with coworkers
    1. For use$ since svelte is never going to support actions for components, i designed something that reminds React hooks that will in some ways replace this feature.

      Isn't that what use$ is trying to do already? How is that "something that reminds React hooks" any different? Will be interested to see...

    1. Thanks for posting this helpful, well written article. Learning programming, or any other thing one takes up, requires you to sit at one place have a plan of action for your study.

      I was going through my Firefox bookmarks and I found article. I had read this article two years back and had commented that I found it to be useful. I read it back in May 2018. As of now, November 2020, my programming skills are still novice-level. I haven't implemented the ideas or followed suggestions given here.

      It has been 2 years and 5 months since I found this article to be relevant and it baffles me that I haven't taken action by making use of the knowledge given in this article. Two long years flew by. I guess reviewing my bookmarks is something that I will do more often.

      The article was posted on May 23, 2018 and I had stumbled on it the next day itself, i.e., May 24, 2018. This gets me thinking that we could finds solutions for problems(latest ones in this case) once we identify it, articulate it, hit the search button and just read stuff. I could presume that what happened next was that I misunderstood "finding a solution" to "realizing the solution", and perhaps became complacent or maybe there were more problems that didn't come to my awareness to identify and further find solutions. I'm not quite sure. Should I have identified my problems and googled more so that I could have learned C and C++ sooner?

      I wonder what held me back from taking action to accomplish and master something that usually takes not more that 5-6 months maximum.

  4. Oct 2020
  5. Sep 2020
    1. The point of the feature is to not rely on the third-party author of the child component to add a prop for every action under the sun. Rather, they could just mark a recipient for actions on the component (assuming there is a viable target element), and then consumers of the library could extend the component using whatever actions they desire.
    2. They don't need to add a prop for every action. The action itself can be passed in as a prop. <script> export let action; </script> <div use:action>whatever</div> The argument for the action can be another prop or can be part of the same prop.
    1. Your tooltip component will have to wrap your image with a span tag or something, it can’t just add events to its children. And if you are adding multiple actions to it you will have to wrap it multiple times.
      <Concern1> <Concern2> </Concern2> </Concern1>

      vs.

      <img use:concern1 use:concern2>

    1. If everyone did all of the above things, they would have the personal infrastructure in place to enable their lives to become zero-emissions. But the above changes only cover 45% of average American emissions—so what gives? The remaining 55% of emissions come indirectly from the goods, services, and food we buy. The only way we’ll get to a zero-carbon world is for each of those industries to adopt new technology and change their processes to be emissions-free, or be replaced with a zero-emissions alternative. That’s why your first action is voting to make sure that policies and incentives are put in place to accelerate the overall transition.

      The "above things" being:

      1. Vote for elected officials who prioritize smart climate policy; join climate action or political groups to support pro-climat candidates and non-profits.
      2. Use only electric vehicles. Your next car [and this right here is a measure of how very car-dependent Americans as a whole are] needs to be electric. [AND you also need to press your power companies and government for clean electricity; lots of electricity comes from coal!]
      3. Electrify your house. There's a reason California's no longer permitting gas in new construction. Induction has vastly improved!
      4. Switch to all-green electricity. See my note on #2.
  6. Aug 2020
  7. Jul 2020
    1. O’Connor, D. B., Aggleton, J. P., Chakrabarti, B., Cooper, C. L., Creswell, C., Dunsmuir, S., Fiske, S. T., Gathercole, S., Gough, B., Ireland, J. L., Jones, M. V., Jowett, A., Kagan, C., Karanika‐Murray, M., Kaye, L. K., Kumari, V., Lewandowsky, S., Lightman, S., Malpass, D., … Armitage, C. J. (n.d.). Research priorities for the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond: A call to action for psychological science. British Journal of Psychology, n/a(n/a), e12468. https://doi.org/10.1111/bjop.12468

  8. Jun 2020
    1. Notre rôle est de provoquer et d’accompagner la nécessaire prise de conscience

      C'est notre rôle également

  9. May 2020
    1. Like all other consent under the GDPR, consenting to cookies needs to be a clear affirmative action. An example is clicking through an opt-in box or choosing settings from the menu. Pay attention to not have pre-ticked boxes on the consent form!
    1. The GDPR requires consent to be opt-in. It defines consent as “freely given, specific, informed and unambiguous” given by a “clear affirmative action.” It is not acceptable to assign consent through the data subject’s silence or by supplying “pre-ticked boxes.”
    1. Ce fonStonnement suppose que les transports sSolaires puissent éventuellement s’adapter enfonSton des modes d’organisaton retenus

      Il faut contacter idf mobilité

  10. Apr 2020
  11. Mar 2020
    1. The remedy which the tradition of Western thought has proposed for the unpredictability and irreversibility of action has consisted in abstaining from action altogether, in the withdrawal from the sphere of interaction with others, in the hope that one’s freedom and integrity could thereby be preserved. Platonism, Stoicism and Christianity elevated the sphere of contemplation above the sphere of action, precisely because in the former one could be free from the entanglements and frustrations of action. Arendt’s proposal, by contrast, is not to turn one’s back on the realm of human affairs, but to rely on two faculties inherent in action itself, the faculty of forgiving and the faculty of promising. These two faculties are closely connected, the former mitigating the irreversibility of action by absolving the actor from the unintended consequences of his or her deeds, the latter moderating the uncertainty of its outcome by binding actors to certain courses of action and thereby setting some limit to the unpredictability of the future. Both faculties are, in this respect, connected to temporality: from the standpoint of the present forgiving looks backward to what has happened and absolves the actor from what was unintentionally done, while promising looks forward as it seeks to establish islands of security in an otherwise uncertain and unpredictable future.
    1. I chose all my scholarly journals, I put them together. I chose some YouTube videos; they were –IF:        Mm-hmm.CF:        – like, a bunch of TED talks.        

      Compiling research materials.

      Is there room for us to think about the iterative process; can we work with instructors to "reward" (or assign) students to alternate the searching, reading and writing.

    2. And – And I seen how – I saw how many, um, scholarly journals or how many sources came up for it, right? Um, number of sources. Right. And then, if I – if I felt like it wasn’t enough for me to thoroughly talk about the topic, I would move on. Right? So, when I did segregation, there – like, I guess, like, my specific topic was modern-day, so there wasn’t really much about it. Right? So, not much info. Right? And then, when I did gentrification, there were a lot, right?

      This part of the process is interesting to me. Links topic selection to search (seemingly a single search).

      It also seems a little misguided. What can we do in our lessons that could make tiny changes to this attitude?

  12. Feb 2020
    1. Wrong solutions can be fixed, but non-existent ones aren’t adjustable at all.
    2. It's important that we keep our focus on action, and don't fall into the trap of analysis paralysis or sticking to a slow, quiet path without risk.
    3. Decisions should be thoughtful, but delivering fast results requires the fearless acceptance of occasionally making mistakes; our bias for action also allows us to course correct quickly.
  13. Dec 2019
  14. May 2019
  15. Apr 2019
    1. stressful but fascinating

      It seems like these two words sum up this last week pretty well for a majority of the group. There has been a lot of information to take in, within a short amount of time. Although it has been a bit on the chaotic side here and there, most of the class can agree that the more we see, the more fascinating it becomes. I think everyone is looking forward to attaining more clarity for the program as a whole. The enthusiasm is contagious. It seems the whole process is new for everyone, and everyone is excited for the adventure.

    1. Despite the controversy Rumisa doesn't regret making the poster. "I'm kind of happy that my poster got a lot of attention," she says.

      Damn straight. Radiant doing.

  16. Mar 2019
    1. UDL guidelines. As I post this, I do not know whether this website will be included in our future course readings or not. This website practices what it preaches and provides the same content in multiple forms. The viewer can select/choose the manner in which items are displayed. This has essential information, such as the need to provide "multiple means" of engagement, representation, action, and expression when teaching. Rating 5/5

    1. This is one of many pages that lists verbs at various levels of Bloom's old taxonomy (verb lists for the new version are easy to find as well). This one has green bars across the page so may not be best for those who are trying to preserve ink though it is easy and attractive to use if referring to it on the screen. Rating 4/5

    1. Thisaccount refuses the representationalist fixation on “words” and “things”and the problematic of their relationality, advocating insteadacausalrelationship between specific exclusionary practices embodied as specific ma-terial configurations of the world(i.e., discursive practices/(con)figurationsrather than “words”)and specific material phenomena(i.e., relations ratherthan “things”). This causal relationship between the apparatuses of bodilyproduction and the phenomena produced is one of “agential intra-action.”The details follow

      Intro to "Agential Intra-Action"

  17. Feb 2019
    1. However, when asked if they would be willing to participate in action research teaming in the future, preservice teacher candidates were more positive (x̄=6.4)<math><mtext>(</mtext><mtext>x</mtext><mtext>̄</mtext><mtext>=6.4)</mtext></math> than their veteran counterparts (x̄=5.8)<math><mtext>(</mtext><mtext>x</mtext><mtext>̄</mtext><mtext>=5.8)</mtext></math>.

      Maybe it's that the preservice teachers are more overwhelmed with learning to teach and they aren't a full staff member in the cooperating district, so potential impact (perception) is decreased.

    2. One way to overcome this isolation is to encourage collaboration with informed peers through established frameworks within school communities.

      Perhaps restructuring traditional PD to be more longitudinal can help. But, how do I manage so many different teams?

    1. Mais on ne peut pas faire grand-chose si la politique est laissée à l’État : les questions écologiques ne peuvent pas reposer sur l’appareil normal de l’État. Ce dernier s’occupe toujours de ce que les militants sont parvenus à rendre visible avant ; il ne peut jamais anticiper sur les questions futures, qui est la tâche politique des chercheurs, des citoyens, des militants et que l’État peut organiser seulement après coup.
    1. o far only as it is beneficial {l,16�(' or hurtful to the true believers.

      By nature, humans are selfish. We're always thinking, whether consciously or not, "what's in it for me?" We deem actions that have a potential benefit to us as praiseworthy, while label unbeneficial actions as hurtful.

  18. Jan 2019
    1. As teachers gained familiarity and agency, they moved from perceiving ‘research’ as a domain that existed outside the classroom, to doing research and seeing where it fits with classroom practice.

      Is the term "action research" a barrier for teachers to engage?

    2. In our research program overall, we have observed the success of teacher teams who follow a cyclical structure of co-planning/ co-teaching/ implementation/ debriefing with enactments (practice) in between team meetings, and so we expected to see this pattern repeat itself (and it did).

      This would be a great use of time for the ambassador program next year.

    3. This discussion informed the development of a problem statement (a brief statement encapsulating the problem under focus in the classroom) and corresponding research question.

      Is there a way to do this in smaller chunks of time? The time commitment to group meetings may dissuade potential participants. How can the researcher help identify and define a problem for teachers to look at?

    4. The most important factor was that at least some visual evidence of classroom practice and student work was shared in team meetings, which allowed team members to literally see what was happening in one another’s classrooms.

      "If you can't see it, it isn't happening."

      Finding time to see these practices is hard. The researcher (or facilitator) can play part of that role in documenting sessions for the group as a whole. Asking teachers to identify examples can also promote observational skills when trying to gather data.

    5. they realized that they would be supported rather than judged and that team members would help to find answers

      The Instruction rounds format would be great for building this trust and teach valid observation techniques.

    6. Teachers saw each other as mutually supportive.

      Building this relationship takes time. Departments support one another, but for collaborative, systemic work, we need to break out of department silos and consider common cross-curricular methods.

    1. hese characteristics require thatemergent response groups adopt specific approaches forknowledge coordination. One such approach commonlydocumented in studies of such groups is their use ofa learn-by-doing (versus decision making) action-basedmodel of coordinated problem solving, in which sensemaking and improvisation are the norm rather than theexception

      Evokes LPP, sensemaking, and improvised coordination.

    1. It should be no surprise recognizing the problematic-theoretical simi­larities between disaster research and its "half-sibling" (e.g., see Wenger 1987), collective behavior. Both disaster research and collective behavior are at a theoretical standstill (e.g., see Aguirre and Quarantelli 1983), and both still rely upon every-day language rather than a broader scheme for describing events (e.g., see Weller and Quarantelli 1973, McPhail 1992). Works by Kreps and Bosworth (1994) and Dombrowsky (1981; 1987), (and perhaps Barton's 1970 classic work) reflect the theoretical attention disaster research needs to build.

      Connects crisis informatics research with collective behavior.

      I wonder though does Neal define collective behavior and collection action differently?

      Look at these citations:

      Quarantelli, E.L. 1985. Emergent Citizen Groups in Disaster Preparedness and Recovery Activities. Final Report 33. Newark, Delaware: Disaster Research Center, University of Delaware

      Turner, Ralph and Lewis Killian. 1987. Collective Behavior. Third Edition. Engle­wood Cliffs, New Jersey: Prentice Hall.

      Weller, Jack M. and E. L. Quarantelli. 1973. "Neglected Characteristics of Collec­tive Behavior," American Journal of Sociology 79:665-85.

      Wenger, Dennis. 1987. "Collective Behavior and Disaster Research." Pp. 213-237 in Sociology of Disasters, edited by R. Dynes, B. De Marchi and C. Pelanda. Milan, Italy: Franco Angeli.

    2. Also, with disaster research having strong theoretical ties with the study of collective behavior(Wenger 1987), and with the field of collective behavior often looking at issues related to social change {e.g., riots, social move­ments), another link between disasters and social change has implicitly

      Neal connects concerns about disaster-driven social change and the natural desire for people to respond via some collective action impulse.

      Nice segue into SBTF as collection action motivated by social change

    1. By examiningwork practices, and tracing how those practices are reified in the social-technical organization of a group that is forming and stabilizing as they do the work, we learn not just what this particular group did, but also how the mechanisms by which collective action in digital environments are organizedbottom-up. We also learn how those lessonsaregraduated into prescriptivetop-down direction to sustain and direct future action

      Interesting frame of reference for this study that also helps to unpack the contribution of the SBTF research.

      Perhaps Elinor Ostrom's work could be helpful here too.

    1. Mendonça, et al.[26] and Kendra and Wachtendorf [20] have characterized this as improvisation, whichhas strong parallels to the conversations in CSCW about the nature of situated cognition or situated work [14,44], as well as the relationship between informal as well as formal aspects of work [30,44]

      Evokes situated action (Suchman) and distributed cognition (Hutchins)

    1. These protocols, formal structures, plans, procedures, and schemes can be con-ceived of asmechanismsin the sense that they (1) are objectified in some way(explicitly stated, represented in material form), and (2) are deterministic or at leastgive reasonably predictable results if applied properly. And they aremechanisms ofinteractionin the sense that they reduce the complexity of articulating cooperativework.

      People apply "mechanisms of interaction" to reduce the complexity of the articulation work.

      Schmidt and Bannon use these examples:

      • Formal and informal organizational structures • Planning and scheduling • Standard operating procedures (see Suchman's work on situated action) • Indexes and classifications for organizational and retrieval (see Bowker and Star on boundary objects/infrastructures)

    1. Reflective design, like reflection-in-action, advocates practicing research and design concomitantly, and not only as separate disciplines. We also subscribe to a view of reflection as a fully engaged interaction and not a detached assessment. Finally, we draw from the observation that reflection is often triggered by an element of surprise, where someone moves from knowing-in-action, operating within the status quo, to reflection-in-action, puzzling out what to do next or why the status quo has been disrupted

      Influences from reflection-in-action for reflective design values/methods.

    2. In this effort, reflection-in-action provides a ground for uniting theory and practice; whereas theory presents a view of the world in general principles and abstract problem spaces, practice involves both building within these generalities and breaking them down.

      A more improvisational, intuitive and visceral process of rethinking/challenging the initial design frame.

      Popular with HCI and CSCW designers

  19. Dec 2018
    1. Social activity is fluid and nuanced, and this makes systems techni-cally difficult to construct properly and often awkward to use.

      CSCW assumption.

      See also: Suchman's 1987 situated action book and contests in Vera and Simon's 1993 paper

      Gist of SA is that HCI (and its breakdowns) must be studied in real-life situations, knowing is inseparable from doing, and cognition can't be separated from context.

      Good summary here:

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Situated_cognition

      https://books.google.com/books?hl=en&lr=&id=AJ_eBJtHxmsC&oi=fnd&pg=PR7&dq=suchman&ots=KrKpjGFHGV&sig=hmJ_pyJymoEweA_XDFWdMedSL4s#v=onepage&q=suchman&f=false

      https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0364021305800084

      https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1207/s15516709cog1701_5

  20. Sep 2018
    1. This won't be the first time that teens use Snapchat as a portal for political action.

      Teens feel that they are capable of voicing their opinions about certain things through Snapchat when they are afraid to speak up.

  21. Aug 2018
    1. He with his whole posteritie must dye, Dye hee or Justice must; unless for him [ 210 ]

      We, Indians can't understand how "his whole posteritie must dye"? We believe in the theory of rebirth and therefore have infinite scope to be liberated. Above all one does not suffer due to others fault. Scripture does not contradict reason.

    1. He lunged for it; a short, hoarse cry came from his lips as he realized he had reached too far and had lost his balance.

      This is an example of the rising action, because the story starts to get tense and the readers start wondering what is going to happen to Rainsford.

    2. He lunged for it; a short, hoarse cry came from his lips as he realized he had reached too far and had lost his balance. The cry was pinched off short as the blood-warm waters of the Caribbean Sea dosed over his head.He struggled up to the surface and tried to cry out, but the wash from the speeding yacht slapped him in the face and the salt water in his open mouth made him gag and strangle.

      This is an example of the rising action since it shows that Rainsford may be leaving the island and we don't know if he is going to come back.

    3. This is the rising action because it is something the main charater does that changes the stories pace and basically starts the plot of the whole story

    4. He leaped upon the rail and balanced himself there, to get greater elevation; his pipe, striking a rope, was knocked from his mouth. He lunged for it; a short, hoarse cry came from his lips as he realized he had reached too far and had lost his balance. The cry was pinched off short as the blood-warm waters of the Caribbean Sea dosed over his head.

      This is an example of rising action, the tone is tense and then when Rainsford falls in the reader can sense that something will be happening soon.

  22. Apr 2018
    1. That was the beginning of things.

      Continued rising action: we are far enough into the novel that there's no real chance of Janie encountering a more suitable romantic interest. Seems inconceivable we have reached the climactic scene.

    2. “Sometimes God gits familiar wid us womenfolks too and talks His inside business. He told me how surprised He was ’bout y’all turning out so smart after Him makin’ yuh differ-ent; and how surprised y’all is goin’ tuh be if you ever find out you don’t know half as much ’bout us as you think

      This speech emblematic of Janie finding her voice and using it.

    3. Janie stood where he left her for unmeasured time and thought. She stood there until something fell off the shelf inside her. Then she went inside there to see what it was. It was her image of Jody tumbled down and shattered. But look-ing at it she saw that it never was the flesh and blood figure of her dreams. Just something she had grabbed up to drape her dreams over. In a way she turned her back upon the image where it lay and looked further. She had no more blossomy openings dusting pollen over her man, neither any glistening young fruit where the petals used to be. She found that she had a host of thoughts she had never expressed to him, and numerous emotions she had never let Jody know about. Things packed up and put away in parts of her heart where he could never find them. She was saving up feelings for some man she had never seen.

      Wow! This is a fairly amazing bit of characterization info for Janie. It suggests that her first "marriage" had been one of convenience, a business transaction between her grandmother and Logan. Her second "marriage" to Joe--a man who stood in such contrast to Logan--was based on the romantic fantasies of a dreamy girl; she realizes here that she's unfulfilled INSIDE, which is what matters most to any human being.

    4. Times and scenes like that put Janie to thinking about the inside state of her marriage.

      From this paragraph until the end of the third one down (just prior to the paragraph that begins "Janie stood where he left her") is some intense rising action and the signal of a major turning point for Janie: all of her Pear Tree Dreams have been systematically wiped away.

    5. Joe returned to the store full of pleasure and good humor but he didn’t want Janie to notice it because he saw that she was sullen and he resented that. She had no right to be, the way he thought things out. She wasn’t even appreciative of his efforts and she had plenty cause to be. Here he was just pouring honor all over her; building a high chair for her to sit in and overlook the world and she here pouting over it! Not that he wanted anybody else, but just too many women would be glad to be in her place.

      Further characterization of Joe; namely, how little he understands Janie (and women, generally).

    6. A little war of defense for helpless things was going on inside her. People ought to have some regard for helpless things. She wanted to fight about it.

      Janie's power is increasing but is not full enough (nor has she yet been made to recognize it) to be wielded.

    7. “They oughta be shamed uh theyselves! Teasin’ dat poor brute beast lak they is! Done been worked tuh death; done had his disposition ruint wid mistreatment, and now they got tuh finish devilin’ ’im tuh death. Wisht Ah had mah way wid ’em all.”

      Foreshadows Janie's rebellion.

    8. She had come to hate the inside of that store any-way. That Post Office too. P

      Janie's discontent swells.

    9. He gits on her ever now and then when she make little mistakes round de store.”

      Here we get the indirect evidence of Janie's unhappiness at Jody's hands.

    10. But any man who walks in the way of power and property is bound to meet hate.

      NIce foreshadowing.

    11. There was something about Joe Starks that cowed the town. It was not because of physical fear. He was no fist fighter. His bulk was not even imposing as men go. Neither was it because he was more literate than the rest. Something else made men give way before him. He had a bow-down command in his face, and every step he took made the thing more tangible.

      This foreshadows (I think at this point) the climax of the novel: Janie will stand up to a power that no one else (read: men) will dare oppose.

    12. A feeling of coldness and fear took hold of her. She felt far away from things and lonely.

      Jody's remark that precedes this paragraph shows how regardless he is of Janie's needs, assuming as he does that all a woman wants is wealth and status.

    13. It must have been the way Joe spoke out without giving her a chance to say any-thing one way or another that took the bloom off of things. But anyway, she went down the road behind him that night feeling cold.

      Hurston seems intent on demonstrating how little the men in the narrative are prone to consider anyone's feelings but their own, which stands in stark contrast to what it is that Janie desperately needs.

    14. She’s uh woman and her place is in de home.”

      Any and all of the instances in which Janie is put down or neglected or objectified by Jody (or members of the Eatonville community), especially when her discomfort is revealed, is part of Rising Action. This passage also exemplifies the motif of Misogyny.

    1. veridical

      Theory of planned behaviour by Ajzen; veridical here means truthful. Three factors:

      1. What is my attitude to the behaviour?
      2. What do others think or I think others think towards my behaviour (normative belief)?
      3. How much control I think or I believe I have towards my behaviour or what factors either make it easy or make it difficult for me to conduct my behaviour?

      These will determine my intention to actually act my behaviour, and then intention precedes my actual conduct.

  23. Nov 2017