27 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2019
    1. Internet Reciprocal Teaching Promotes the Five CsCreativity: Students use divergent-thinking skills to generate their own questions and keywords for online searches. Their final projects require them to creatively express their own point of view. Communication: Students share what they learn as they work in small groups and with the whole class. They communicate with a wider audience by posting on a class blog. Collaboration: Students create collaborative knowledge through Internet inquiry and social interactions. They comment on one another's work using technologies such as VoiceThread and support one another through instant messaging. Critical Thinking: When using the Internet, students build the text they read, choosing which links to follow and which to ignore. The nonlinear nature of online reading helps support critical thinking. Students also learn to question the perspective and bias of online sources. Comprehension: Students learn important online reading skills, such as how to distinguish news articles from blog posts and editorials. They carefully read texts they encounter online to understand and evaluate different perspectives.

      5 Cs

    2. As the tide shifts from page to screen, students must learn to comprehend evolving texts.

      summary

    3. Internet inquiry offered students the opportunity to explore authentic issues while building online reading comprehension skills.

      The benefits of using Internet Inquiry are exploring real-life problems and improving online reading comprehension skills at the same time.

    4. This project differs from the traditional research project in that the focus is on the process of inquiry and not the product of research. Students develop an understanding of how important it is for them to play an active role in their own learning and experience the satisfaction associated with knowing how to question, locate, evaluate, synthesize, and communicate information.

      process vs. product (result) Internet Reciprocal Teaching Phase 3: Student-Centered Learning

    5. No one gave students a map for Internet inquiry. Students needed a sextant, a tool for navigation, to guide them.

      So true! I often feel the same way. I'm expected to do things that I've never learned and use tools that I'm not familiar with. On one hand, this is part of life and it is great if at one point in our life we learn to put aside our discomfort, feel comfortable or even excited to "step out of our comfort zone", but on the other hand, if we are giving out assignments, it is important to be aware of where our students are, what they know and what tools they capable of using.

    1. by your student learning objectives, as well as your own technological, pedagogical, and content area knowledge (TPACK) and objectives

      combination of TPACK and SLO for the IIP.

    2. “credibility” and “relevance”…but they do understand words like “truthful” and “useful.”

      important distinction; students can understand these simpler vocab words that essentially mean the same thing.

    3. five phases:
      1. students collaborative with instructor to pick area of interest and work on a DQ to guide their research.
      2. students engage in OCI as the do research and use digital tools to make discoveries 3.Students use critical thinking to evaluate online info by analyzing credibility of their info. 4.Students synthesize what they learned/researched by combining info in multiple, multimodal sources.
      3. Students engage in online content construction by putting their research into their own words and choosing the best digital tool/text before sharing their answers.
    4. ell with Project Based Learning (PBL) initiativ

      IIP lines up with PBL

    5. nterest driven,

      I think this is crucial. This intrinsically motivates students to be curious and conduct proper research.

    6. The Internet Inquiry Project is an online research project that helps students develop the important digital knowledge and skills needed as they build their web literacies.

      IIQ helps students develop and craft web literacy by cultivating web knowledge and skills.

  2. May 2019
  3. Nov 2018
  4. Sep 2018
  5. www.lrng.org www.lrng.org
    1. agriculture, mining, logging, fishing

      What would an urban youth think about? My guess: tourism, transportation, health, education, entertainment, police, government. I looked it up here: http://blogs.worldbank.org/sustainablecities/top-ten-new-urban-jobs I would add construction and service to my list, and technology.

  6. Jul 2018
    1. Students collaboratively (with the instructor) identify an area of interest and co-construct a driving question to guide inquiry. Students engage in online collaborative inquiry as they search and sift through online texts using digital tools to address their focus of inquiry. Students critically evaluate online information by considering the credibility (truthfulness) and validity (usefulness) of the information obtained. Students synthesize what they have learned during their online inquiry by actively curating and synthesizing information across multiple, multimodal sources. Student engage in online content construction by synthesizing what they have learned and selecting the best digital text or tool before sharing this answer.

      5 phases of internet inquiry: useful list

    1. Your digestive (say: dye-JES-tiv) system started working even before you took the first bite of your pizza. And the digestive system will be busy at work on your chewed-up lunch for the next few hours — or sometimes days, depending upon what you've eaten. This process, called digestion,

      A good website option to give students for online collaborative inquiry (when having students research, list this website)

  7. Oct 2017
    1. Motivation and persistence. Because learning is more relevant and relationship-based, students are motivated to complete tasks and learn

      Collaborative annotation can be used to scaffold self-directed learning, providing a means for a student to explore their own interests and provide evidence of that activity, and enabling teachers to monitor and interact with these knowledge pathways.

    2. learning how to conduct their own research, often on the Internet.

      Collaborative annotation and independent inquiry: students reading what they're interested and annotating; teachers following along in the process through activity pages.

  8. Jul 2017
    1. Students collaboratively (with the instructor) identify an area of interest and co-construct a driving question to guide inquiry.

      I really like this because even though we have to cover certain content that aligns with state standards, students can still have a say in what they learn. In studying a particular topic, we can ask "What part of this most interests you? What should we learn more about within this topic of study?" And students can pick a driving question that most interests them.

    2. The Internet Inquiry Project is an online research project that helps students develop the important digital knowledge and skills needed as they build their web literacies. Internet Inquiry Projects are student interest driven, and are more authentic as a learning activity than traditional WebQuests.
  9. Feb 2017
  10. Aug 2016
    1. But those crying the loudest to stop the lock-out laws fail to provide an adequate alternative.

      Response piece "No Surprise The Young Don't Support Lock-Out Laws" (31 Aug 2016) at Stony Roads mentions this statement.

      There are some terrible personal opinions in this article that really push a tired and very under constructive rhetoric.

      'Those crying the loudest to stop the lock-out laws fail to provide an adequate alternative'.

      This quote alone shows a lack of research into Matt Barrie's 70 page submission, any consideration into the views of the people who went to the effort of writing 1 of the 1,856 submissions to State parliament, or simply the lack of effort to type in google, 'alternative solutions to lockout laws'.

      The reference to "Matt Barrie's 70 page submission" can be supposed as that included in the article posted by Matt Barrie on LinkedIn, "The death of Sydney's nightlife and collapse of its night time economy" (03 April 2016), submission titled "A Detailed Submission to the Callinan Inquiry on Liquor Laws". That submission/article is mainly about the circumstances under which the lock-out laws were proposed and enacted, as well as the results of those laws so far (with considerable detail on political and statistical manipulations and misrepresentations), and not so much about providing alternatives, however it does suggest that the lock-out laws themselves are far from an adequate solution.

      Note that Matt Barrie's submission was covered fairly well by the SMH in their own article, "Sydney lockout laws a dismal failure, Matt Barrie writes in 70-page submission" (04 April 2016). The article by Jennifer Duke this annotation is for is, by stark contrast, little more than anecdotal or purely "personal opinion".

      The group named Keep Sydney Open is probably representative of "those crying the loudest", having organised public rallies attended by many thousands of people (estimates of 10,000 to 15,000). The Huffington Post interviewed spokesperson, Tyson Koh, for the article "Sydney Lockout Laws Have Had A 'Massive Effect' On Community, Jobs" (13 Feb 2016):

      Koh pointed to a number of alternate strategies used in places like New York, Vancouver and Amsterdam to combat late-night violence.

      Twenty four-hour public transport, more visible policing in nightlife precincts, staggered venue closing times and introducing later dining and retail hours all had merit, he said.

      "There's a lot of things that are available to us that will improve safety and enable people to go out to all hours."

  11. Jul 2015
    1. The streets transform every ordinary day into a series of trick questions, and every incorrect answer risks a beat-down, a shooting, or a pregnancy.

      Given my interest in inquiry and the use of questions, I wonder if Coates would say the same about school, that it transforms "every ordinary day into a series of trick questions," and (I fear) "every incorrect answer risks a beat-down" -- even if it's just humiliation and bad grades.

    2. I have asked this question all my life. I have sought the answer through my reading and writings, through the music of my youth, through arguments with your grandfather, with your mother. I have searched for answers in nationalist myth, in classrooms, out on the streets, and on other continents. The question is unanswerable, which is not to say futile.

      (I know this is an aside... but maybe it isn't.) Just in case anybody needed a definition of "inquiry," these sentences would do just fine. I know it can seem like too much to ask of youth, but I think we can find ways to help them to find the question they have been asking all of their lives, just like Coates's question here: "unanswerable, which is not to say futile." How different that is from finding a "researchable question."

    3. I write you in your 15th year. I am writing you because this was the year you saw Eric Garner choked to death for selling cigarettes; because you know now that Renisha McBride was shot for seeking help, that John Crawford was shot down for browsing in a department store. And you have seen men in uniform drive by and murder Tamir Rice, a 12-year-old child whom they were oath-bound to protect.

      This is what we need in our teaching with other 15 year olds. In our curriculum, do we have a strand... maybe a stance... a readiness... an ill-formed set of prompts... an inquiry at the ready... that also says: We are teaching http://youthvoices.net/blacklivesmatter (as one example -- thank you Renée Watson) because this was that year that you saw...

    4. indistinct sadness

      I like that he is taking us on a journey of this sadness becoming more clear or perhaps he is just noticing the times when it comes up.