23 Matching Annotations
  1. Mar 2019
    1. Perhaps, he realized, these viruses don’t actually need to unite their segments in the same host cell. “If theory was saying that this is impossible, maybe the viruses just don’t do it,” he says. “And once we had this stupid idea, testing it was very easy.”

      This is different from the theory of evolution or the theory of electromagnetism. It's a smaller things, like an assumption. Evolution, also in biology, is a more encompassing set of ideas. So the theoretical framework has a hierarchy. Perhaps at the top is a Kuhnian paradigm or a Lakatosian research program.

      Does this hierarchy different between sciences, though? Like, how hard is it to take a new assumption and grow it into a fully-fledged theory? Biology is more complex than physics, with more "facts" and forms to understand. Evolution is different from electromagnetism because it doesn't limit as much. EM clearly prescribes what's possible and what isn't, whereas evolution doesn't make the distinction so clearly.

  2. Feb 2019
    1. But the greatest drawback of our educational methods is that we pay an excessive amount of altention to the natural sciences and not enough to ethics.

      How would society be different if we paid more attention to ethics as opposed to the natural sciences? What would an ethics-oriented society look like?

  3. Oct 2018
  4. Oct 2017
    1. but the occupation reported as having the largest number of former master’s students was kindergarten–Grade 12 (K–12) teacher. These results demonstrate that master’s degree graduates in learning sciences have the potential to influence practice in a diverse range of applied settings.

      Considering that 31% of master graduates are in the K-12 teachers or educational leaders and administrators, it would be interesting to see what would happen if they implement the learning theories into their classrooms and schools.

    1. Some good men, and even of respectable information, consider the learned sciences as useless acquirements; some think that they do not better the condition of men; and others that education like private & individual concerns, should be left to private & individual effort

      In this quote, there is this all or nothing mentality; many of the founders seem to take different stances. The question: is the teaching and education of "learned sciences" beneficial? Universities in the 21st century seem to promote goals aimed at developing deeper thinkers, people with a desire and curiosity to continue learning, even after college. The fact that there was such a debate over whether "learned sciences" were an important factor of the UVA curriculum is shocking to me since the University seems to be so centered around creating "informed citizens" nowadays. I have a hard time understanding how learned sciences are useless since I believe they do "better the conditions of men." Learned sciences promote engagement throughout all disciplines and create better students and sharper thinkers as they have stronger abilities to collaborate with others. I think they included this statement to avoid criticism; they decided to ultimately leave the decision of whether or not to include learned sciences to the “private and individual effort,” exhibiting that this decision would be less contested if left to the specific individuals (i.e. professors and students). This surprised me to read because it’s easy to see how much values have changed to bring us to today’s version of the University of Virginia. From my “Doing Fieldwork” engagement, it is easy to see how much other people influence our own perceptions and ideas, so I think that Learned Sciences are an essential part of a college education.

  5. Apr 2017
  6. Feb 2017
    1. professional forums

      I'm curious how platforms like Hypothesis, and more broadly the social practices afforded by open annotation, help create the conditions for new types of professionally-relevant (online) forums. I think a stance toward engagement with the political dimensions of learning is complementary to the work organizations like Hypothesis who are building tools and partnerships for a more democratic, peer-reviewed web. https://youtu.be/QCkm0lL-6lc

    2. to prompt and engage a dialogue

      One means of engaging such dialogue is through the public annotathon scheduled for February 27th through March 3rd, and which will occur right here - in the margins of this pre-print turned blog post. See my post for more information about the annotathon, and how to join and use Hypothesis.

    3. This pre-publication version of "The Learning Sciences in a New Era of U.S. Nationalism" is the featured text of an annotathon, scheduled for Monday, February 27th through Friday, March 3rd, in collaboration with The Politics of Learning Writing Collective and Cognition & Instruction. Thanks to Thomas Phillip, Susan Jurow, Shirin Vossoughi, Megan Bang, and Miguel Zavala for graciously agreeing to participate in the annotathon of their article, and to Noel Enyedy and Jamie Gravell for their assistance in organizing and promoting the event.

      Questions can be addressed here via Page Notes (a type of annotation attached to an entire document/URL, and not in-line), or via Twitter (@remikalir).

  7. Nov 2016
  8. Oct 2016
    1. ValuesIn striving to achieve our mission, we place high value on:Providing client-oriented services characterized by personal, professional, and organizational integrity. Producing quality work products anchored in science.Creating a nurturing environment responsive to individual needs for growth and professional development.Maintaining a spirit of openness, constructive communication, collegiality, and teamwork in all our work.Striking an appropriate balance between the demands of work and the private lives of our staff.Diversity of ideas, opinions, backgrounds, life styles, and experiences of our staff.Individual initiative and entrepreneurship on the part of our staff.Making a better world while enjoying work.

      Example of values articulated by the American Institutes for Research

  9. Jul 2016
    1. Page 204

      Borgman on the different types of data in the social sciences:

      Data in the social sciences fall into two general categories. The first is data collected by researchers through experiments, interviews, surveys, observations, or similar names, analogous to scientific methods. … the second category is data collected by other people or institutions, usually for purposes other than research.

    2. Page 202

      Borgman on information artifacts in the social sciences

      like the sciences, the social sciences create and use minimal information. Yet they differ in the sources of the data. While almost all scientific data are created by for scientific purposes, a significant portion of social scientific data consists of records credit for other purposes, by other parties.