393 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. But “humane technology” is precisely the sort of pleasant sounding but ultimately meaningless idea that we must be watchful for at all times. To be clear, Harris is hardly the first critic to argue for some alternative type of technology, past critics have argued for: “democratic technics,” “appropriate technology,” “convivial tools,” “liberatory technology,” “holistic technology,” and the list could go on.

      A reasonable summary list of alternatives. Note how dreadful and unmemorable most of these names are. Most noticeable in this list is that I don't think that anyone actually built any actual tools that accomplish any of these theoretical things.

      It also makes more noticeable that the Center for Humane Technology seems to be theoretically arguing against something instead of "for" something.

    1. One of the flaws of using Digital Mappa for projects like this appears to be that it acts more as a viewer (as a result of it's original use with maps) than as something for text. As a result, when looking at various pages, the URL of the page and it's attendant resources doesn't change, so one can't link to particular resources within the work, nor can one easily use digital tools (Hypothes.is for example), to anchor and annotate portions of the text.

    1. This is a facsimile and diplomatic edition of Codex Vercellensis CXVII, Archivio e Biblioteca Capitolare di Vercelli.

      An interesting example of a digitized version of a book.

  2. Apr 2021
    1. Firefox extension: https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/promnesia/

      Promnesia is a browser extension for Chrome/Firefox (including Firefox for Android!) which serves as a web surfing copilot, enhancing your browsing history and web exploration experience.

      TLDR: it lets you explore your browsing history in context: where you encountered it, in chat, on Twitter, on Reddit, or just in one of the text files on your computer. This is unlike most modern browsers, where you can only see when you visited the link.

      I've been doing something a bit like this manually and it looks a lot like the sort of UI examples I've been collecting at https://boffosocko.com/2019/06/29/social-reading-user-interface-for-discovery/

    1. This is a pretty solid overview of a literature review workflow. He doesn't use the words, but this is not a half bad way to build a digital commonplace book or digital garden/personal wiki for research use.

      I hadn't thought about using Grav as the method for storing and displaying all of it, but perhaps it's worth looking into?

    1. An interesting outline of how Colin Madland uses Notion for his Ph.D. research work.

      He's got a good list of some pros and cons at the bottom. The export sounds a bit hairy on one front, but at least gives you some sort of back up in case the worst were to happen.

      Not sure it's the thing for me and I'm happier with my workflow using Obsidian at the moment, though some of the ideas about process here could be helpful.

      It looks like he's got some of the same issues in using Grav for his knowledge work as I do in WordPress, though the taxonomy and Webmention portions do tend to help me a bit.

      Colin brought this to my attention at the OERxDomains21 conference.

    1. You mock up content layout using wireframe models of key pages. You can go deep into this or keep it surface-level. There are dedicated apps like UXPin and Mockflow, but I find that Adobe Illustrator works well with the right wireframe UI kit.
    1. DM gives you simple but/and powerful tools to mark up, annotate and link your own networked collections of digital images and texts. Mark up your image and text documents with highlights that you can then annotate and link together. Identify discreet moments on images and texts with highlight tools including dots, lines, rectangles, circles, polygons, text tags, and multiple color options. Develop your projects and publications with an unlimited number of annotations on individual highlights and entire image and text documents. Highlights and entire documents can host an unlimited number of annotations, and annotations themselves can include additional layers of annotations. Once you've marked up your text and image documents with highlights and annotations, you can create links between individual highlights and entire documents, and your links are bi-directional, so you and other viewers can travel back and forth between highlights. Three kinds of tools, entire digital worlds of possible networks and connections.

      This looks like the sort of project that @judell @dwhly @remikalir and the Hypothes.is team may appreciate, if nothing else but for the user interface set up and interactions.

      I'll have to spin up a copy shortly to take a look under the hood.

    1. 2 main types of aeration

      1. hollow tine aeration: pulling plugs out of the soil.

      2. solid tine aeration (a spading fork): you're just poking holes in the ground

      Do it after the last frost is past, because if water gets in holes and freezes, the freeze can damage

    2. Plug tool for transplanting plugs of grass

    1. Is a lawn roller necessary? It is spring, and I imagine the soil in your yard is lumpy because of the frost that occurred in the previous months. This is why you think a lawn roller is necessary. Well, unless you’re maintaining a golf course, I wouldn’t recommend a lawn roller. It just isn’t necessary.
    2. Most would argue a cardboard drum is better than options like grease drums. The reason for this is that a cardboard drum does not have ridges on it, so it can level the yard properly. Another advantage of this homemade lawn-roller equipment is that it is lightweight and as such won’t lead to soil compaction.
    3. If you’re installing new sod, you may use a light roller to make sure the pieces come into close contact with soil for the roots to grow and take hold.
    4. There are times when you may need to flatten a bumpy lawn. For example, a golf course or a cricket pitch may be rolled to attain a smooth, level surface for playing. This is when a lawn roller may be needed.
    5. In short, here’s why a lawn roller may not be necessary for your lawn: Using heavy rollers on the ground leads to soil compaction.Compacted soil causes slow root development and slower turfgrass growth.
    1. Use a leveling drag instead of a grass seed roller If you’re smoothing the lawn to cultivate it, a leveling drag may suffice.
    2. 1. Use Plywood (alternative when laying sod) One of the most inexpensive alternatives to lawn rollers is that sheet of plywood lying around your home. Plus, it’s amazingly simple to use. Follow these steps to help your sod bond with the soil…. Step 1: Place a 4 ft. by 8 ft. piece of plywood on your new lawn. Step 2: Walk over it to press your sod solidly into the soil. We suggest that you invite a friend, if possible, to walk alongside you. The plywood distributes the applied weight evenly and will have an impact similar to a commercial lawn roller.
    1. What can I use in place of a lawn roller?I raked in some bags of top soil and reseeded a very large section of my lawn (a walkway was moved) but the area is very soft and you sink in about 4 inches if you step there.Is there something I can use instead of a lawn roller? I don't have one...
    1. A tool targeted at journalists that appears to be a silo-based app for backing up/archiving articles on the web as well as providing analytics, newsletter/email functionalities, and other options.

    1. Joplin is a free, open source note taking and to-do application, which can handle a large number of notes organised into notebooks. The notes are searchable, can be copied, tagged and modified either from the applications directly or from your own text editor. The notes are in Markdown format.

      This might be an interesting tool to do import/export from Evernote and/or OneNote to get documents into markdown format (possibly for use in Obsidian.)

  3. Mar 2021
    1. @ajlkn has several related projects including this one:

      Might be an interesting experiment to make one or more of them IndieWeb friendly and create a set up to dovetail one or more of them in with the GitHub pages set up.

    1. Ludwig is the first sentence search engine that helps you write better English by giving you contextualized examples taken from reliable sources.

    1. ActivityPub 是一种去中心化的内容聚合协议,可以让其他用户远程订阅你的内容。它很像升级版的 RSS,但是支持远程推送。这里是 ActivityPub 协议技术细节的介绍。
    1. This looks interesting. Web based? Also includes version control as well as collaboration support.

    1. Use the button to get a sharable link to the page with annotations.

      so super dope that you can toggle highlights & annotations to be private or public, and then can share a hypothesis link for a page, and then people can see your highlights on the page that are public, and dont see the ones you set as private, oh wow!!!

    1. Plausible is a lightweight, self-hostable, and open-source website analytics tool. No cookies and fully compliant with GDPR, CCPA and PECR. Made and hosted in the EU 🇪🇺

      Built by

      Introducing https://t.co/mccxgAHIWo 🎉<br><br>📊 Simple, privacy-focused web analytics<br>👨‍💻 Stop big corporations from collecting data on your users<br>👉 Time to ditch Google Analytics for a more ethical alternative#indiehackers #myelixirstatus #privacy

      — Uku Täht (@ukutaht) April 29, 2019
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    1. I've come across about 20 reference for Ivan Illitch over the past month. Not sure what is driving it. Some mentions are coming out of educator circles, others from programmers, some from what I might describe as "knowledge workers" (digital gardeners/Roam Cult/Obsidian crowds). One tangential one was from someone in the hyperlink.academy crowd.

      Here's a recent one from today that popped up within a thread shared in IndieWeb chat:

      Ivan Illich continues to be even more more relevant than he was at the height of his New Left popularity. Conviviality in the digital tools we use has continued to wither https://t.co/D88V6KL7Ez pic.twitter.com/OFDYTjXyCn

      — Count Bla (@123456789blaaa) March 15, 2021
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

      Deschooling Society and Tools for Conviviality look very interesting. Perhaps they've distilled enough that their ideas are having a resurgence?

    2. He wrote that "[e]lite professional groups ... have come to exert a 'radical monopoly' on such basic human activities as health, agriculture, home-building, and learning, leading to a 'war on subsistence' that robs peasant societies of their vital skills and know-how. The result of much economic development is very often not human flourishing but 'modernized poverty', dependency, and an out-of-control system in which the humans become worn-down mechanical parts."[13] Illich proposed that we should "invert the present deep structure of tools" in order to "give people tools that guarantee their right to work with independent efficiency."[34]

      Amazon anyone?

    3. the need to develop new instruments for the reconquest of practical knowledge by the average citizen.

      This fits into the idea of older knowledge and memory systems of indigenous peoples

    1. Of course, the great thing about IndieWeb ideas is that if I ever do have that problem, a tool is already available. And if you have that problem right now, you just need to open up the IndieWeb toolkit and pull it out.

      You don't buy the hardware store because it's there, you visit it to get the right tool for the right job.

    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>David Molloy</span> in Why popular YouTubers are building their own sites - BBC News (<time class='dt-published'>03/07/2021 16:14:09</time>)</cite></small>

  4. watchnebula.com watchnebula.com
    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>David Molloy</span> in Why popular YouTubers are building their own sites - BBC News (<time class='dt-published'>03/07/2021 16:14:09</time>)</cite></small>

    1. ReconfigBehSci. (2020, November 5). In 4 days: SciBeh workshop ‘Building an online information environment for policy relevant science’ Join us! Topics: Crisis open science, interfacing to policy, online discourse, tools for research curation talks, panels, hackathons https://t.co/SPeD5BVgj3… I https://t.co/kQClhpHKx5 [Tweet]. @SciBeh. https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1324286406764744704

    1. Having an understanding of higher level abstractions, such as tasks, activities and the historical code path taken, its debugging trace is much closer to how you, as an engineer, think about your code.
    2. This is my absolute favorite feature ever and the official reason for (re-)writing Trailblazer 2.1. It makes me happy every time I use it.
    1. ReconfigBehSci on Twitter: ‘1 week to the SciBeh workshop “Building an online information environment for policy relevant science” Join us, register now! Topics: Crisis open science, interfacing to policy, online discourse, tools for research curation talks, panels, hackathons https://t.co/Gsr66BRGcJ https://t.co/uRrhSb9t05’ / Twitter. (n.d.). Retrieved 2 March 2021, from https://twitter.com/SciBeh/status/1323207455283826690

    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Aaron Parecki</span> in #indieweb 2021-03-01 (<time class='dt-published'>03/01/2021 15:30:09</time>)</cite></small>

    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Ben Awad</span> in Scraping Recipe Websites (<time class='dt-published'>03/01/2021 15:28:08</time>)</cite></small>

  5. Feb 2021
    1. tabset makes life easier for iTerm2 users, enabling easy setting of tab and window titles, badges, and colors. If you have a lot of tabs/windows in operation simultaneously, tabset helps to visually distinguish them.

    1. You’re allowed to blame us for a terrible developer experience in Trailblazer 2.0. It’s been quite painful to find out which step caused an exception. However, don’t look back in anger! We’ve spent a lot of time on working out a beautiful way for both tracing and debugging Trailblazer activities in 2.1.
    1. This looks like it's in the vein of annotation tools as well as reference managers to compete with Zotero and Hypothes.is.

      Looks like it's Windows specific. But it is open source now too: https://github.com/jimmejardine/qiqqa-open-source

    1. This project is somewhat related to getmemex.com

      Zegnat et al.: FYI WorldBrain's Memex (= getmemex.com) has some shared history with my WebMemex project; we collaborated for some months, then went in somewhat different directions; I focussed on web page snapshotting for a while, and got distracted with other things; WorldBrain's version added more and more features and got a lot closer to what I had in mind for WebMemex. — via treora # 21:34 on 2021-02-12

    1. There's a bash debugger, bashdb, which is an installable package on many distros. It uses bash's built-in extended debugging mode (shopt -s extdebug).
    1. It’s been less than a year since Roam started to gain traction, Notion just added Roam’s signature bi-directional link functionality, and there are already open-source “Roam compatible” apps on the horizon, like Athens.

      This is the first reference I've heard about [[Athens]], but there are many others that aren't mentioned here including Obsidian, Foam, TiddlyWiki, etc. which have been adding the backlinking capabilities.

    1. This looks like a cool little UI for tweetstorms. I'd love it better if it had Micropub support.

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>agentofuser</span> in Micropub Tweetstorm Builder - Apps - Fission Talk (<time class='dt-published'>02/17/2021 22:00:26</time>)</cite></small>

  6. jam.systems jam.systems
    1. Potential Clubhouse-like audio tool.

      Found via tweet mentioned in IndieWeb chat:

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Sam Rye</span> in Sam Rye on Twitter: "Open source alternative to Clubhouse 👏 Great for audio-centric events and group people... https://t.co/UTwbjD8595 Ping @EnrolYourself @danielyep @LornaPrescott_ @unevendistrib @solarpunk_girl" / Twitter (<time class='dt-published'>02/17/2021 11:45:36</time>)</cite></small>

    1. sharing it on a cloud-based platform.

      Interesting that tools would come up at this stage. Chances are, someone's curation toolkit will cover all the steps and there are some tools which integrate several of these. Refworks, Zotero, and Mendeley might be interesting examples in that they allow for cloud sharing yet focus on the information management.

    1. The idea of a purely linear text is a myth; readers stitch together meanings in much more complex ways than we have traditionally imagined; the true text is more of a network than a single, fixed document.

      The internet isn't a new invention, it's just a more fixed version of the melange of text, ideas, and thought networks that have existed over human existence.

      First there was just the memory and indigenous peoples all over the world creating vast memory palaces to interconnect their thoughts. (cross reference the idea of ancients thinking much the way we do now from the fist episode or so of Literature and History)

      Then we invite writing and texts which help us in terms of greater storage without the work or relying solely on memory. This reaches it's pinnacle in the commonplace book and the ideas of Llull's combinatorial thought.

      Finally we've built the Internet which interconnects so much more.

      But now we need to go back and revisit the commonplace book and memory techniques to tie them altogether. Perhaps Lynne Kelly's concept of The Third Archive is what we should perfect next until another new instantiation comes to augment the system.

    1. They also turned their reading into writing, because commonplacing made them into authors. It forced them to write their own books; and by doing so they developed a still sharper sense of themselves as autonomous individuals. The authorial self took shape in the common man’s commonplace book, not merely in the works of great writers. It belonged to the general tendency that Stephen Greenblatt has called “Renaissance self-fashioning.”

      This fits into my broader developing thesis about thinking and writing as a means of evolving thought.

    1. I'm curious to take a look after seeing this. Thanks for the recommendation.

      I've tried Memrise and Duolingo before and like Duolingo a lot. I don't think they've got a French option, but I've also been using a platform called SSiW or Say Something in Welsh (they've got a few other languages too). I like their focus on verbal fluency over the methods traditionally taught in most classroom settings.

      Having studied a handful of languages in the past, I'm quite impressed at how much and how well I can understand Welsh after only 20 minutes or so a day for about a month.

  7. parsejournal.com parsejournal.com
    1. technology can no longer be understood as a set of tools used by humans, and instead has become an ecology in which humans participate
    1. Tools for determining the value of a keywordHow much value would a keyword add to your website? These tools can help you answer that question, so they’d make great additions to your keyword research arsenal:

      With so many tools to determine the value of a keyword, which one do you recommend is the most beneficial and accurate? I struggle with the trial and error aspect of audience acquisition and engagement. With so many great tools available at our fingertips, which I was unaware of until this course, how do we know which tool to use? Do these tools contradict each other?