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  1. Jun 2021
    1. 2021-06-10

    2. Only in our anti-truth hellscape could Anthony Fauci become a supervillain—The Washington Post. (n.d.). Retrieved June 16, 2021, from https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/media/sullivan-fauci-emails/2021/06/09/8b0724a8-c93a-11eb-81b1-34796c7393af_story.html

    3. Right-wing commentators are pretending that thousands of newly released emails from Anthony S. Fauci represent some kind of smoking gun against the government’s top infectious-disease expert, whom they have recently decided to try to destroy.Support our journalism. Subscribe today.arrow-rightI haven’t been nearly as excited by the emails, which are mostly full of mundane correspondence. But there’s at least one line in them that stands out.“I genuflect to no one but science and always, always speak my mind when it comes to public health,” the normally even-tempered scientist wrote in March of last year, to an epidemiologist who had accused a number of public health officials of appeasing the science-challenged President Donald Trump.Story continues below advertisementAt 80, Fauci has served in Republican and Democratic administrations since the Reagan era. And until recently, he has garnered widespread respect. The reason is in that email: He’s really not a political animal, but someone who is all about the science.
    4. Only in our anti-truth hellscape could Anthony Fauci become a supervillain
    1. 2021-04-26

    2. Osmanov, I. M., Spiridonova, E., Bobkova, P., Gamirova, A., Shikhaleva, A., Andreeva, M., Blyuss, O., El-Taravi, Y., DunnGalvin, A., Comberiati, P., Peroni, D. G., Apfelbacher, C., Genuneit, J., Mazankova, L., Miroshina, A., Chistyakova, E., Samitova, E., Borzakova, S., Bondarenko, E., … Sechenov StopCOVID Research Team. (2021). Risk factors for long covid in previously hospitalised children using the ISARIC Global follow-up protocol: A prospective cohort study [Preprint]. Pediatrics. https://doi.org/10.1101/2021.04.26.21256110

    3. 10.1101/2021.04.26.21256110
    4. Background The long-term sequelae of coronavirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) in children remain poorly characterised. This study aimed to assess long-term outcomes in children previously hospitalised with Covid-19 and associated risk factors.Methods This is a prospective cohort study of children (≤18 years old) admitted with confirmed Covid-19 to Z.A. Bashlyaeva Children’s Municipal Clinical Hospital in Moscow, Russia. Children admitted to the hospital during the first wave of the pandemic, between April 2, 2020 and August 26, 2020, were included. Telephone interview using the International Severe Acute Respiratory and emerging Infection Consortium (ISARIC) Covid-19 Health and Wellbeing paediatric follow up survey. Persistent symptoms (>5 months) were further categorised by system(s) involved.Findings Overall, 518 of 853 (61%) of eligible children were available for the follow-up assessment and included in the study. Median age was 10.4 years (IQR, 3–15.2) and 270 (52.1%) were girls; median follow-up since hospital discharge was 256 (223-271) days. At the time of the follow-up interview 126 (24.3%) participants reported persistent symptoms among which fatigue (53, 10.7%), sleep disturbance (36, 6.9%,) and sensory problems (29, 5.6%) were the most common. Multiple symptoms were experienced by 44 (8.4%) participants. Risk factors for persistent symptoms were: age “6-11 years” (odds ratio 2.74 (95% confidence interval 1.37 to 5.75) and “12-18 years” (2.68, 1.41 to 5.4), and a history of allergic diseases (1.67, 1.04 to 2.67).Interpretation A quarter of children experienced persistent symptoms months after hospitalization with acute covid-19 infection, with almost one in ten experiencing multi-system involvement. Older age and allergic diseases were associated with higher risk of persistent symptoms at follow-up. Our findings highlight the need for replication and further investigation of potential mechanisms as well as clinical support to improve long term outcomes in children.Funding None.
    5. Risk factors for long covid in previously hospitalised children using the ISARIC Global follow-up protocol: A prospective cohort study
    1. 2021-06-10

    2. Burton, J. W., Cruz, N., & Hahn, U. (2021). Reconsidering evidence of moral contagion in online social networks. Nature Human Behaviour. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41562-021-01133-5

    3. 10.1038/s41562-021-01133-5
    4. The ubiquity of social media use and the digital data traces it produces has triggered a potential methodological shift in the psychological sciences away from traditional, laboratory-based experimentation. The hope is that, by using computational social science methods to analyse large-scale observational data from social media, human behaviour can be studied with greater statistical power and ecological validity. However, current standards of null hypothesis significance testing and correlational statistics seem ill-suited to markedly noisy, high-dimensional social media datasets. We explore this point by probing the moral contagion phenomenon, whereby the use of moral-emotional language increases the probability of message spread. Through out-of-sample prediction, model comparisons and specification curve analyses, we find that the moral contagion model performs no better than an implausible XYZ contagion model. This highlights the risks of using purely correlational evidence from large observational datasets and sounds a cautionary note for psychology’s merge with big data. Download PDF
    5. Reconsidering evidence of moral contagion in online social networks
    1. 2021-06-10

    2. G7 support for pharma monopolies is putting millions of lives at risk | Amnesty International. (n.d.). Retrieved June 12, 2021, from https://www.amnesty.org/en/latest/news/2021/06/g7-support-for-pharma-monopolies-putting-millions-of-lives-at-risk/

    3. The self-interest of G7 countries is the biggest obstacle to ending the Covid-19 pandemic, a group of campaigning organizations said today. Ahead of the G7 Leaders’ Summit, the People’s Vaccine Alliance warned that G7 promises to vaccinate the world by 2022 will be impossible to fulfill, if governments continue blocking proposals to waive patents and share life-saving technology.
    4. G7 support for pharma monopolies is putting millions of lives at risk
    1. 2021-06-04

    2. Tay, L. Q., Hurlstone, M. J., Kurz, T., & Ecker, U. K. H. (2021). A Comparison of Prebunking and Debunking Interventions for Implied versus Explicit Misinformation [Preprint]. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/48zqn

    3. 10.31234/osf.io/48zqn
    4. Psychological research has offered valuable insights into how to combat misinformation. The studies conducted to date, however, have three limitations. First, pre-emptive (“prebunking”) and retroactive (“debunking”) interventions have mostly been examined in parallel, and thus it is unclear which of these two predominant approaches is more effective. Second, there has been a focus on misinformation that is explicitly false, but misinformation that uses literally true information to mislead is common in the real world. Finally, studies have relied mainly on questionnaire measures of reasoning, neglecting behavioural impacts of misinformation and interventions. To offer incremental progress towards addressing these three issues, we conducted an experiment (N = 735) involving misinformation on fair trade. We contrasted the effectiveness of prebunking versus debunking and the impacts of implied versus explicit misinformation, and incorporated novel measures assessing consumer behaviours (i.e., willingness-to-pay; information seeking; online misinformation promotion) in addition to standard questionnaire measures. In general, we found debunking to be more effective than prebunking, although both were able to reduce misinformation reliance. We also found that individuals tended to rely more on explicit than implied misinformation both with and without interventions.
    5. A Comparison of Prebunking and Debunking Interventions for Implied versus Explicit Misinformation
    1. 2021-06-04

    2. Kuepper-Tetzel, C. E., & Nordmann, E. (2021). Watch Party Lectures: Synchronous Delivery of Asynchronous Material [Preprint]. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/ys4jn

    3. 10.31234/osf.io/ys4jn
    4. Watch party lectures combine asynchronous and synchronous teaching approaches: lecturers record short videos of the directly instructed content, for one-hour lectures, lecturers aim to record 2-3 short videos for a maximum of 40-45 minutes. These pre-recorded videos are uploaded on the virtual learning environment (VLE). However, the crucial element of watch party lectures is the scheduled, synchronous time during which these pre-recordings are watched together via screen sharing. Watch party lectures allow for meaningful interactions between lecturer and students while watching the videos. Students use the chat box to ask questions and the lecturer addresses them immediately, e.g., by providing links to additional resources. Watch party lectures were welcomed by students and lecturers alike and we strongly recommend integrating both asynchronous and synchronous elements in the future, regardless of the modality or format of teaching delivery.
    5. Watch Party Lectures: Synchronous Delivery of Asynchronous Material
    1. 2021-06-06

    2. Hammerstein, S., König, C., Dreisoerner, T., & Frey, A. (2021). Effects of COVID-19-Related School Closures on Student Achievement—A Systematic Review [Preprint]. PsyArXiv. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/mcnvk

    3. 10.31234/osf.io/mcnvk
    4. The COVID-19 pandemic led to numerous governments deciding to close schools for several weeks in spring 2020. Empirical evidence on the impact of COVID-19-related school closures on academic achievement is only just emerging in the literature. The present work aimed to provide a first systematic overview of evidence-based studies on general and differential effects of COVID-19-related school closures in spring 2020 on student achievement in K–12. The findings indicate a considerably negative effect of school closures on student achievement specifically in younger students and students from families with low socioeconomic status. At the same time, certain measures can be identified that might mitigate these negative effects. The findings are discussed in the context of their possible consequences for future national educational policies when facing future school closures.
    5. Effects of COVID-19-Related School Closures on Student Achievement—A Systematic Review
    1. 2021-06-15

    2. Siegrist, M., & Bearth, A. (2021). Worldviews, trust, and risk perceptions shape public acceptance of COVID-19 public health measures. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 118(24), e2100411118. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2100411118

    3. 10.1073/pnas.2100411118
    4. Because of the outbreak of COVID-19, most countries have implemented measures aimed at reducing the number of infected people. However, these measures only work if they are generally accepted by the public. We conducted a two-wave longitudinal survey in Switzerland (n = 1,223) to study the factors that would influence perceived risks and the acceptance of the measures. Our findings showed that people with individualistic worldviews, high general interpersonal trust, low social trust, a low level of perceived risks, and the conviction that risks other than health risks were neglected had less acceptance of the implemented measures compared with people who held the opposite views on the mentioned variables. The number of infected people declined between survey waves 1 and 2. This desired effect not only reduced people’s perceived risks but also decreased their social trust and increased the conviction that other risks were neglected. Finally, the acceptance of the measures declined. Our data also support the idea that reduced risk perceptions and a decline in social trust are important drivers for the reduction in the acceptance of the measures in survey wave 2. Our results suggest that as soon as the measures attain success or the public is tired of the implemented restrictions, public acceptance declines, and it seems difficult to prolong the measures as may be desirable from an epidemiological standpoint. The importance of worldviews and trust for public acceptance of the measures further suggests the necessity of a political discussion about the implemented measures.
    5. Worldviews, trust, and risk perceptions shape public acceptance of COVID-19 public health measures
    1. 2021-05-29

    2. Doctors for XR on Twitter: “https://t.co/OwN3VQsGqw @richardhorton1 speaking to @DrTedros today on video link at #WHA74 about the similarities of #COVID19 and #climatecrisis and the cost of inaction. This before Tedros addressed Doctors + Nurses protesting at the WHO. #WHO #RedAlertWHO https://t.co/yComw7YNR3” / Twitter. (n.d.). Retrieved June 6, 2021, from https://twitter.com/DoctorsXr/status/1398656730570145796

    3. https://reuters.com/business/environment/medics-march-who-headquarters-climate-campaign-2021-05-29/… @richardhorton1 speaking to @DrTedros today on video link at #WHA74 about the similarities of #COVID19 and #climatecrisis and the cost of inaction. This before Tedros addressed Doctors + Nurses protesting at the WHO. #WHO #RedAlertWHO
    1. 2021-06-04

    2. Lessler, J., Grabowski, M. K., Grantz, K. H., Badillo-Goicoechea, E., Metcalf, C. J. E., Lupton-Smith, C., Azman, A. S., & Stuart, E. A. (2021). Household COVID-19 risk and in-person schooling. Science, 372(6546), 1092–1097. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.abh2939

    3. 10.1126/science.abh2939
    4. In-person schooling has proved contentious and difficult to study throughout the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic. Data from a massive online survey in the United States indicate an increased risk of COVID-19–related outcomes among respondents living with a child attending school in person. School-based mitigation measures are associated with significant reductions in risk, particularly daily symptoms screens, teacher masking, and closure of extracurricular activities. A positive association between in-person schooling and COVID-19 outcomes persists at low levels of mitigation, but when seven or more mitigation measures are reported, a significant relationship is no longer observed. Among teachers, working outside the home was associated with an increase in COVID-19–related outcomes, but this association is similar to that observed in other occupations (e.g., health care or office work). Although in-person schooling is associated with household COVID-19 risk, this risk can likely be controlled with properly implemented school-based mitigation measures.
    5. Household COVID-19 risk and in-person schooling
    1. 2021-06-02

    2. Wood, S., & Schulman, K. (2021). When Vaccine Apathy, Not Hesitancy, Drives Vaccine Disinterest. JAMA. https://doi.org/10.1001/jama.2021.7707

    3. Even before COVID-19 vaccines were available, different interest levels in vaccination across the US were noted.1 Populations with less interest in vaccination were quickly considered vaccine hesitant, and public health campaigns have primarily, and understandably, focused on reaching persons anxious about vaccine safety, vaccine-related adverse effects, or both. But while vaccine anxiety is an important hurdle to overcome, the assumption that all segments of the population with low interest in vaccination are hesitant is a misconception. The COVID-19 vaccine is arguably the most important new product of 2021, but until recently, vaccine promotion efforts have not addressed the full implications of marketing a single product to a large, heterogeneous population.2 From a marketing perspective, disinterest in vaccination from some segments of the population is unsurprising and reflects typical innovation-adoption patterns in which half of the market is usually slow to make a choice. This appears to be a description of the sizeable segment of the population that has not participated in public vaccination campaigns. News reports now recognize the challenges of vaccinating an entire population, but the sophistication of the current collective vaccine-promotion strategies have evolved more slowly and focus on alleviating vaccine anxieties related to efficacy and safety.2 However, for much of the estimated 39% of the US population currently not vaccinated or reportedly not planning to receive the vaccine as soon as possible,3 vaccine apathy rather than true hesitancy may be an important major concern, and addressing apathy necessitates an entirely different communication approach than addressing hesitancy.
    4. 10.1001/jama.2021.7707
    5. When Vaccine Apathy, Not Hesitancy, Drives Vaccine Disinterest
    1. 2021-06-03

    2. Spain details new system of coronavirus restrictions to be applied until 70% of population is vaccinated | Society | EL PAÍS in English. (n.d.). Retrieved June 5, 2021, from https://english.elpais.com/society/2021-06-03/spain-details-new-system-of-coronavirus-restrictions-to-be-applied-until-70-of-population-is-vaccinated.html

    3. Despite opposition from some regions, the ‘traffic light’ measures – including early closing hours and capacity limits for bars and restaurants – will be obligatory across the country
    4. Spain details new system of coronavirus restrictions to be applied until 70% of population is vaccinated
  2. May 2021
    1. 2021-05-26

    2. Martin McKee: What did we learn from Dominic Cummings’ evidence to MPs on the covid crisis? - The BMJ. (n.d.). Retrieved May 29, 2021, from https://blogs.bmj.com/bmj/2021/05/26/martin-mckee-what-did-we-learn-from-dominic-cummings-evidence-to-mps-on-the-covid-crisis/?utm_campaign=shareaholic&utm_medium=twitter&utm_source=socialnetwork

    3. Cummings’ evidence portrays a system that is not fit for purpose and goes some way to explaining why the UK’s performance on covid-19 was so poor
    4. Martin McKee: What did we learn from Dominic Cummings’ evidence to MPs on the covid crisis?
    1. 2021-05-26

    2. Wadman, M. (2021). Antivaccine activists use a government database on side effects to scare the public. Science. https://doi.org/10.1126/science.abj6981

    3. 10.1126/science.abj6981
    4. On 5 May, Fox News host Tucker Carlson delivered a 10-minute monologue casting doubt on the safety of COVID-19 vaccines on his show, Tucker Carlson Tonight. He announced that almost 4000 people had died after getting COVID-19 vaccines, and added that those data “comes from VAERS,”—the Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System, a U.S. government program that collects reports of side effects possibly caused by vaccines. It was a misleading statement. The reporting of a death to VAERS indicates nothing about what caused it, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) subsequent investigations have found no indication that deaths were caused by COVID-19 vaccines, save in a small subset with an extremely rare clotting disorder linked to one vaccine. But the TV segment pulled VAERS, a 31-year-old early warning system widely relied on by scientists, even deeper into the culture wars over vaccination. After the broadcast, a new phalanx of antivaccine activists began plumbing VAERS for data to scare the public about vaccination, says Angelo Carusone, president of Media Matters for America, a left-leaning nonprofit that is monitoring anti–COVID-19 vaccine activity on social media. “We have been tracking these attacks since February and this one resonated in a different way after Tucker hit it,” Carusone says.
    5. Antivaccine activists use a government database on side effects to scare the public
    1. 2021-05-27

    2. Prof. Christina Pagel on Twitter: “So Hancock confirms that B.1.617.2 (‘India’ variant) is now dominant in England. Harries says we must remain ‘vigilant’. What does vigilant even mean? That we watch very carefully as a new, more dangerous, variant takes over cos it was so fun last time? Yeah, I’m pissed off” / Twitter. (n.d.). Retrieved May 28, 2021, from https://twitter.com/chrischirp/status/1397951741283405825

    3. So Hancock confirms that B.1.617.2 ("India" variant) is now dominant in England. Harries says we must remain "vigilant". What does vigilant even mean? That we watch very carefully as a new, more dangerous, variant takes over cos it was so fun last time? Yeah, I'm pissed off
    1. 2021-05-11

    2. Health Department-Reported Cases of Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C) in the United States ​ | CDC. (n.d.). Retrieved May 28, 2021, from https://www.cdc.gov/mis-c/cases/index.html

    3. Summary The median age of patients with MIS-C was 9 years. Half of children with MIS-C were between the ages of 5 and 13 years. 63% of the reported patients with race/ethnicity information available occurred in children who are Hispanic or Latino (1,166 cases) or Black, Non-Hispanic (1,042 cases). 99% of patients had a positive test result for SARS CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The remaining 1% of patients had contact with someone with COVID-19. 60% of reported patients were male.
    4. Health Department-Reported Cases of Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C) in the United States ​
    1. 2021-05-26

    2. The government’s current emphasis on personal responsibility and showing “common sense” once again displaces blame for their ineffective response to covid-19, says Simon Williams
    3. The UK’s coronavirus policy still places too much responsibility—and blame—on the public