28 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2021
  2. Sep 2021
  3. May 2021
    1. First of all, I would start off presenting yourself: Dear XYZ support team I am the web developer in charge of example.com website. By presenting you this way, you are establishing the frame to treat you, hinting that you should be presupposed to be somewhat proficient, so they could choose to answer in a more technical detail.
    2. Feel free to hint, brag, or both! The best CS reps should easily take a hint from clear language and a signature like John Appleseed, JavaScript/Ruby Developer, but any will catch on with a simple line like "I know what I'm doing, so I'd appreciate an extra-technical explanation!"
    3. If you choose to say 'I already told you that' {4} then your tone of voice is critical. If you say the above in a snarky/belittling tone the rep isn't going to want to help you. And that does matter. Smile between each response - especially if you are tired or annoyed.
    4. Hey, I'm a PhD in [field] and do [whatever] professionally. Before calling you, I've narrowed down the problem to [something on their end], so that's what needs to be addressed. If I could speak to an engineer about [specific problem], that'd be great; but if we've gotta walk through the script, let's just knock it out quickly. If they end up requiring the script, then the best way to use your expertise is to run through it quickly. Keep the chit-chat to a minimum and just do the stuff efficiently. If they start describing how to perform some step, you might interrupt them with, "Got it, just a sec.", then let them know once you're ready for the next step.
    5. With experience you would get to have an idea about how knowledgeable the customer was just by talking to them for a few seconds, but you have to be careful not to assume things.
    6. However, what speaks against just straight up telling them that you're working as [Insert title of your position] and you know what you're talking about?
    7. because you display knowledge of the field naturally and you also show them you know how system administration in general works
    8. OP is referring to letting people know they can speak like proper adults when talking about technical terms, without going through the usual nanny-like discourse that tech support has to provide to non-techies. For instance, it happened to me with Amazon support. The speaker told me exactly where to touch in order to clear the cache of the Android Amazon App Store. Given that I work as an app developer the guy could have just said "please clear the cache". No need to go through "tap here, then here, now you should see this, tap that"...
    9. I have tried different tactics of showing the tech support that I am proficient in their field of work (I work as a web developer). Specifically: using accurate terms and technologies to show my knowledge of them and telling the support that I am the "administrator" of the website in question.
    10. How to let tech support subtly know that I am proficient without showing off?
  4. Mar 2021
  5. Feb 2021
  6. Sep 2020
    1. the caregiver and the quality of the relationship (33), functioning as a mediator of attachment experiences (34). These representations tend to be extended into adulthood (17). In certain cases, parents are not able to provide a safe haven for their children, offering them frightening or unpredictable caregiving (27). As a consequence, experiences of interpersonal trauma can be detrimental to the core conceptual system (35) and can become permanently imprinted in an individual’s internal working model (31), including ensuing long-lasting effects on attachment and interpersonal relationships in later life

      Abuse can start as early as infancy and continue to affect the child into adulthood.

      I was correct when I said that I think the lack of nurture as a child and the lack of parents affect my confidence and the way that I view relationships.

      Childhood is where you begin to develop confidence... think self soothing. When they don't fear things continuously they feel same and they feel secure.

  7. Aug 2020
  8. Jul 2020
  9. journals.sagepub.com journals.sagepub.com
    1. Sorokowska, A., Sorokowski, P., Hilpert, P., Cantarero, K., Frackowiak, T., Ahmadi, K., Alghraibeh, A. M., Aryeetey, R., Bertoni, A., Bettache, K., Blumen, S., Błażejewska, M., Bortolini, T., Butovskaya, M., Castro, F. N., Cetinkaya, H., Cunha, D., David, D., David, O. A., … Pierce, J. D. (2017). Preferred Interpersonal Distances: A Global Comparison. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 48(4), 577–592. https://doi.org/10.1177/0022022117698039

  10. Jun 2020
  11. journals.sagepub.com journals.sagepub.com
    1. Sorokowska, A., Sorokowski, P., Hilpert, P., Cantarero, K., Frackowiak, T., Ahmadi, K., Alghraibeh, A. M., Aryeetey, R., Bertoni, A., Bettache, K., Blumen, S., Błażejewska, M., Bortolini, T., Butovskaya, M., Castro, F. N., Cetinkaya, H., Cunha, D., David, D., David, O. A., … Pierce, J. D. (2017). Preferred Interpersonal Distances: A Global Comparison. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 48(4), 577–592. https://doi.org/10.1177/0022022117698039

  12. May 2020
  13. Apr 2020
  14. Sep 2015
    1. In fact, he finds privacy is achieved more often through rules regulating interpersonal behavior rather than by direct manipu- lation of the environment

      Maybe instead of actually building things that provide privacy, creating a societal structure that respects the need for privacy..?