63 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Angelo: No, it's actually the very first time that I've been able to tell this without actually crying or anything like that because I don't want to embarrass myself or anything. Yes, it's very literally very hard. Mother’s Day, Father’s Day, right now my kids are in birthday season—my kids literally have birthdays back to back. So I mean, it's literally hard. My first Christmas here, I had no idea it was already Christmas until I saw lights. So, I literally just stood in front of them where I was staying—I was staying with my uncles—and I just stared at the lights and just broke down. And there's many times where that happens to me. There's a car that I used to have, or let's say McDonald's or any little thing, a pretty park—I walk by a pretty park—and I just picture my kids. So, it's very difficult mainly because of my kids. That's all I wanted to be, a father. I want to say that I gave them everything. And it's just very hard not being able to, for all that work to just be taken away just like that.Isabel: Yeah. I mean especially when you're saying like being a father, being a good father and talking about not being able to forgive your own father for the way that he treated your mother, being able to rise from that, to be the man that you want to be. Not having that figure as a father, like knowing you don't want to replicate that.Angelo: Exactly.Isabel: And the cruel irony of then still be pictured as that person that you never wanted to be.Angelo: Exactly. And that was my main goal, just like you said it, that was the perfect words. I wanted to be someone that my father was never to me and to my family. So, I said “I'm going to be the best father,” and I want to say that I was, but it just got taken away. It's very hard because my kids right now, they stay with their grandparents—they don't have a father. I think to myself on Father's Day at school, what are they making? Who are they giving the projects to? My oldest son, he remembers me.Isabel: You mentioned that your return to Mexico was very difficult, you had a lot of struggles, like all the alcoholism, also finding a job, socially. Do you mind just going into some of the obstacles you ran into on your return?Angelo: On my return to Mexico, my very first day here in Mexico, I spent the night in on the border, in Tamaulipas, Mexico. And literally I didn't want to do anything else. The very first thing I did was go to a store, and I bought a beer and I asked the lady at the store, "Will I get in trouble if I walk around the streets with the beer?" And she said, "You'll be fine. You have two or 300 pesos, right?" I said, "Yeah I just came back from the United States, I have money." “You'll be fine, if somebody pulls you over, just give them that and you'll be completely fine. “So that was the very first thing I did getting here to Mexico. There's so much alcoholism in my family that when I got here in Mexico, I said, "Okay, well it's in my blood. Let's go for it." And literally there will be times where I would just go out and buy a vodka bottle and go to my room, buy some orange juice and just literally drink until I passed out. And that went on for about half a year until one day, I guess I got really sick. I had the hiccups a lot that three or four in the morning, I was making too much noise.Angelo: I literally do not remember this, but there were people banging on my door trying to get in. Nobody was able to get in, they had to break the door down. And from what they told me, I was just in a corner and just literally choking on myself, with so much hiccups that, and I was just [inaudible]. The next morning and everybody sat down with me, and they literally—Isabel: Who’s everybody?Angelo: My uncles. I was staying at my uncle's house, so my uncle's family sat down with me, my cousins, and they had to pull me straight. They literally said, “You're not right.” They didn't talk to me too much because just them saying “You're not all right,” it clicked into my head that it was a very, very, very first time that I blacked out drinking, the very, very first time. So I told myself, "How do you not remember this happening? How do you not remember any of this? Or why are they telling you this? What did you do?" And I just saw my father all over again, and that was it, that's when I stopped drinking on the daily.Angelo: Yes. Because depression is a big part of my life. In the United States, I got diagnosed with bipolar depression, so there's just times where one time I could be happy, and then I think of something and literally my world ends. So getting here to Mexico, that was my escape, that was my answer, that was my... I can't say it wasn't the answer because for me my goal was to destroy myself, my goal was to get mugged in the middle of the street. There would be times where I literally walked around the state of Mexico three, four in the morning, just in the middle of the street, just looking for trouble. I wanted somebody to find me, I wanted somebody to…you know, all these dangerous streets that people were telling me, I wanted that, I don't know, I wanted to just destroy myself.Angelo: I wanted to get beaten down, I wanted for something bad to happen, and it was very hard. So whenever they had to break down the door, it was a big eye opener because they had to call my mom, and my mom did not know any of this. And my mom's a very big important part of my life, even over there she would always help me with stuff. She would always run around with me, she would always go shopping with me if I needed anything for my kids, she was always right there, if I needed babysitter, she was always right there. So whenever they had to call my mom, and they told her, "You know what, your son is doing this" [Emotional]. That brought so much shame to me, and that's when I said, I told my mom, "I'm sorry, I'm not going to do what my father did, so I'm done." And that was it. That's when I said, "I'm not going to do this again to my mom."

      Return to Mexico, Challenges, family separation, mental health, Family relationships, feelings, sadness, disappointment, frustration, despair

  2. May 2021
    1. “Finance is, like, done. Everybody’s bought everybody else with low-cost debt. Everybody’s maximised their margin. They’ve bought all their shares back . . . There’s nothing there. Every industry has about three players. Elizabeth Warren is right,” Ubben told the Financial Times.

      Pretty amazing statement! Elizabeth Warren is right!

    1. Another student comments: “[it p]rovided a quick and easy technique which allowed me to learn the citric acid cycle almost effortlessly.”

      This is a pretty mean feat given the complexities of what the citric acid cycle entails, even with a story of what it is and what the starting and ending reactants are, and a basic starting knowledge of the organic chemistry involved.

      In my experience almost all microbiology students and medical students dislike this commonly memorized cycle.

  3. Mar 2021
  4. Feb 2021
  5. Jan 2021
    1. You raise the money that you need to put on your festival, and then you put on your festival and you have to start all over again

      A cycle

    1. The rationale for branches is simple. Each snap in the Snap Store has a default track called ‘latest’ in which there are four channels named ‘stable’, ‘beta’, ‘candidate’ and ‘edge’. These are all typical buckets in which snaps are published for an extended period, perhaps months or maybe even years. Branches on the other hand are short-lived silos for publishing snaps. 
  6. Dec 2020
    1. An authority that answers to itself, that derives its power not from an open system, but from a closed system is a tyranny and prone to a failure-denial cycle in which each failure is then covered up by greater abuses of power until the resulting disaster can no longer be covered up.

      failure-denial cycle

    1. Hier ist auch bemerkenswert, wie viele Wissenschaftler mitgearbeitet haben.

      Der Artikel steht sehr gut klar, weshalb das net zero-Ziel problematisch ist. Unter anderem erklärt er Basics des schnellen und des langsamen Carbon Cycle.

      Unter anderem wird dabei klar, dass es nur relativ wenig bringt, einfach darauf zu setzen neue Bäume zu pflanzen.

  7. Oct 2020
  8. Aug 2020
  9. Jul 2020
    1. In the rolling-release model that most browsers follow these days the alpha -> beta -> stable cycle is short so the typical "alpha slowly gets more stable & when it gets stable enough we mark it as beta" model doesn't and cannot apply here.see more0
  10. Jun 2020
    1.  Access through your institutionto view subscribed content from home OutlineDownload full text in PDFDownloadShareExportAdvancedOutlineAbstractKeywordsDiagnostic Microbiology and Infectious DiseaseAvailable online 11 June 2020, 115109In Press, Journal Pre-proofWhat are Journal Pre-proof articles?Heat inactivation decreases the Qualitative

      covid-19_poster

  11. May 2020
    1. This issue is going backwards in the process, not forwards. Surely, Gitlab should be focusing on things that have already been allocated milestones, especially ones that have had milestones pushed continuously for 3 years. You can argue that it shouldn't have had a milestone added in the first place, but maybe Gitlab should focus on clearing the "backlog" of issues that have already been issued milestones, and backlog new issues until some of the older issues have been solved.
  12. Mar 2020
    1. Don't be discouraged when you get feedback about a method that isn't all sunshine and roses. Facets has been around long enough now that it needs to maintain a certain degree of quality control, and that means serious discernment about what goes into the library. That includes having in depth discussions the merits of methods, even about the best name for a method --even if the functionality has been accepted the name may not.

      about: merits

  13. Feb 2020
    1. Wouldn't let me annotate a selection on this page:

      Reinforce your feedback loop

      The Timeline centralizes all your changes. It allows customers to browse updates, share and send feedback. Collected reactions provide the right information for improving your product and reducing churn.

  14. Nov 2019
    1. I believe that many of the current challenges in public sectors link back to two causal factors: googletag.cmd.push(function() { googletag.display('div-gpt-ad-1560300455224-0'); }); The impact of increasing reactivism to politics and 24-hour media scrutiny, in public sectors (which varies across jurisdictions); and The unintended consequences of New Public Management and trying to make public sectors act like the private sector.
    1. Checked Indeterminate (checked) Unchecked Indeterminate (unchecked)

      Interesting that indeterminate is after the determinate. I would tend to think of the indeterminate state as being first, since that is the default/initial state of a form control like checkbox or radio button. Oh well...

    2. Change the cycle used to determine the next state of the checkbox when the user click the component, or when the toggle() method is called
  15. Oct 2019
    1. The actual availability of NH4+ and NO3− is difficult to measure in soil. When rates of microbial N transformations and/or plant uptake are rapid, then NH4+ or NO3− levels can be undetectable in soil
  16. Sep 2019
  17. Nov 2018
    1. Koh et al. (11) detailed a cycle of crisis care elaborating the nature of high medical costs, possibly resulting from fear and denial. First, an individual is in need of medical help, so he or she goes to a physician's office where the staff asks the individual to fill out a complex and confusing form. The physician examines the patient and explains the condition and treatment options using medical jargon. Numerous prescriptions, laboratory tests, and referrals are given without confirmation of the patient's comprehension. The staff sends the patient home with complicated instructions. Inevitably, the patient may consume medication incorrectly or miss follow-up appointments, and his or her condition worsens. Eventually, the patient presents to the emergency department, and the hospital staff develops a new treatment plan. Again, no one confirms the patient's understanding. When the patient is discharged, he or she is likely to get sick again and repeat the cycle (11)
  18. Oct 2018
    1. From reading this I'm left with the impression that the housing boom was just a housing boom, not a general long-term projects boom, as you would expect from the ABCT.

      Why was housiing and just housing the epicenter of the boom and bust? Or wasn't it?

      If it was just housing, couldn't we explain it (or at least conceive of a different hypothetical scenario) without interest rates even changing? Imagine that the government prints money and uses it to pay companies to build houses -- or creates a special lending program just for houses, but don't messes up with the general interest rate -, wouldn't that have basically the same effect?

      If so, perhaps we should start considering a new ABCT version that just talks about new money being created and going to specific sectors, instead of the whole interest/intertemporal adjustments/hayekian triangles talk. Why is this wrong?

    2. It's not that people switched from buying hot dogs to hamburgers; instead they switched from buying "present consumption" to buying "future consumption."

      What if we said that people switched from buying hot dogs to bonds? Not anything "future", just a bond, today.

      If they switched to hamburgers, that would increase investment in the hamburger industry in expense of the hot dog industry.

      In the same way, if they switch to bonds, that will increase the investment in the "bonds industry", which is basically lending money.

    1. Because the capital structure of the economy becomes internally inconsistent, eventually some entrepreneurs must abandon their projects because there are insufficient capital goods to carry them all to completion.

      This argument have confused me my entire life in all explanations of the Austrian Business Cycle Theory. It is the core of the most famous of all, that Mises story about the master builder who doesn't have enough material to finish the house he's building.

      It is misleading and ultimately wrong because economic goods (in the Menger definition) are always insufficient. In simple terms, given the market price, every good can be obtained.

      What happens after the economy realizes it was in a malinvestment boom, prices of capital goods adjust in a way that they can become too expensive for some projects to be completed profitably.

  19. Sep 2018
    1. Into the Wormhole

      This scene, as with many others, represents a crucial point in the movie. I think this also has some connection of what was discussed on the first day of class in relations to singularity. One student suggested that singularity in an astronomical context seems to be a black hole that implodes on itself. Further discussed in a linguistics context, we described how singularity shares connections with being alone or unique and individual. In the "into the wormhole" scene in 2001: A Space Odyssey, all of humankind is erased except for David. Advancements in technology had reached its peak to a point where David literally enters a black hole or a worm hole, in which he lives the rest of his life alone and passes away quietly. This signifying mankind imploding on themselves and being reborn. His passage signifies the rebirth of humankind and presents the idea of the cycle of life, where technology is nonexistent and life begins again. There is a sense of reverse chronology in the movie as the ending scene is continued at the beginning of the movie where the monkeys demonstrate their journey towards intelligence once more.

  20. Mar 2018
    1. An Arabidopsis rbcs1a rbcs2b mutant (double mutant 1a2b) was generated by crossing T-DNA insertion lines GABI_608F01 (At1g67090) and GABI_324A03 (At5g38420). The 1a3b mutant (GABI_608F01 (At1g67090); SALK_117835 (At5g38410)) was provided by Hiroyuki Ishida, Department of Applied Plant Science, Tohoku University, Japan.
  21. Nov 2017
    1. The idea that we can collaboratively build a platform that will frame the discourse and promote sharing is a promising aftereffect of the current MOOC backlash.

      Since the term “disruptive” has come to be associated with Clay Christensen’s model, there might be something closer to a reappropriation model like Hippies appropriating VW Beetles, Roadsworth painting pedestrian crossings into zippers, or circuit benders making musical instruments out of old toys. Somewhere, someone may subvert a MOOC into something useful. In fact, Arshad Ahmad once described a successful MOOC which had lost its instructors. Learners started owning their learning activities.

    2. basic Web 2.0 premises of aggregation, openness, tagging, portability, reuse, multichannel distribution, syndication, and user-as-contributor
    3. the experimentation and possibility of the MOOC movement had become co-opted and rebranded by venture capitalists as a fully formed, disruptive solution to the broken model of higher education.11
    4. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), which have become the poster child of innovation in higher education over the last two to three years
    1. Alan Levine’s comment also needs to be kept for posterity:

      I so appreciate the framing of this history for the oMOOC (Original) as "courses of lectures" which seems not focused on the lectures but the discussions generated. And thanks for the mention of the ds106 assignment bank (a concept I seem to suggest in every project) but I must make a small historical credit. Grant Potter was definitely part of the foundation, but his great contribution was DS106 Radio. The person who credit for the Assignment Bank must go to is Martha Burtis who did this and more for co-creating DS106, but she's often invisible in the Shadow of Groom. I did the archeology on the Assignment Bank history: http://cogdogblog.com/2016/10/ds106-history-details/ I dream that someone would fund you to roll out the model described, maybe it's a dMOOC (Downsian) not that it would likely overtake the xMOOC Hype Train (which all its is shiny conductors have jumped off the train, i just keeps rolling through burgs like EdSurge).

    2. access to one-on-one (and possible small circle) consultations for a fee
    3. We (had we ever been given the opportunity) would have created the business proposition very differently.
    4. access to the top researchers in the field
    5. I think that universities (especially the 'elite' universities) have lost the plot when it comes to their value proposition (or, at least, what they tell the world their value proposition is).

      In some ways, the strongest indictment of the MOOC hype.

    1. Toxoplasmosis is caused by the obligate intracellular parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. Its life cycle consists of 3 forms, including an oocyst, a tissue cyst, and an active (proliferative) form.

      See also: CDC- Toxoplasmosis

      Toxoplasmosis

      Source of Infection in humans:

      1. Eating under cooked meat of animals harboring tissue cysts
      2. Consuming food or water contaminated with cat feces or by contaminated environmental samples (such as fecal-contaminated soil or changing the litter box of a pet cat)
      3. Blood transfusion or organ transplantation
      4. Transplacentally from mother to fetus

      Sources of T. gondi infection

      Life cycle of T. gondi

    1. the way of MOOCs – a few years of wild hype about revolutionary potential followed by inevitable domestication by the academy.

      That sure is one way to put it. Same expectation for #NGDLE?

  22. Oct 2016
    1. He who was living is now dead We who were living are now dying

      These two lines indicate that the wheels are always turning. The circle of life. The only thing constant is change!

  23. Jul 2016
    1. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) have been the subject of much hyperbole in the educational/eLearning world for a few years now, under the guise of spreading university-quality education to the masses for free (the hyperbole is dwindling down, but not completely).

      Cue Rolin Moe, who has investigated the MOOC hype so thoroughly. We may still follow a Gartner Cycle (Merton did warn us about self-fulfilling prophesies). But much of those phases have been documented.