71 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2022
    1. Contents 1 Overview 2 Reasons for failure 2.1 Overconfidence and complacency 2.1.1 Natural tendency 2.1.2 The illusion of control 2.1.3 Anchoring 2.1.4 Competitor neglect 2.1.5 Organisational pressure 2.1.6 Machiavelli factor 2.2 Dogma, ritual and specialisation 2.2.1 Frames become blinders 2.2.2 Processes become routines 2.2.3 Resources become millstones 2.2.4 Relationships become shackles 2.2.5 Values becomes dogmas 3 The paradox of information systems 3.1 The irrationality of rationality 3.2 How computers can be destructive 3.3 Recommendations for practice 4 Case studies 4.1 Fresh & Easy 4.2 Firestone Tire and Rubber Company 4.3 Laura Ashley 4.4 Xerox 5 See also 6 References

      Wiki table of contents of the Icarus paradox

    1. Inevitably, I read and highlight more articles than I have time to fully process in Obsidian. There are currently 483 files in the Readwise/Articles folder and 527 files marked as needing to be processed. I have, depending on how you count, between 3 and 5 jobs right now. I am not going to neatly format all of those files. I am going to focus on the important ones, when I have time.

      I suspect that this example of Eleanor Konik's is incredibly common among note takers. They may have vast repositories of collected material which they can reference or use, but typically don't.

      In digital contexts it's probably much more common that one will have a larger commonplace book-style collection of notes (either in folders or with tags), and a smaller subsection of more highly processed notes (a la Luhmann's practice perhaps) which are more tightly worked and interlinked.

      To a great extent this mirrors much of my own practice as well.

    1. Unfortunately most init systems don't do this correctly within Docker since they're built for hardware shutdowns instead. This causes processes to be hard killed with SIGKILL, which doesn't give them a chance to correctly deinitialize things.
    2. According to the Unix process model, the init process -- PID 1 -- inherits all orphaned child processes and must reap them. Most Docker containers do not have an init process that does this correctly. As a result, their containers become filled with zombie processes over time.
    1. When a process loses its parent, init becomes its new parent. init periodically executes the wait system call to reap any zombies with init as parent.
    2. Zombie processes should not be confused with orphan processes: an orphan process is a process that is still executing, but whose parent has died. When the parent dies, the orphaned child process is adopted by init (process ID 1). When orphan processes die, they do not remain as zombie processes; instead, they are waited on by init.
    3. The result is that a process that is both a zombie and an orphan will be reaped automatically.
    4. The term zombie process derives from the common definition of zombie — an undead person. In the term's metaphor, the child process has "died" but has not yet been "reaped". Also, unlike normal processes, the kill command has no effect on a zombie process.
    5. This occurs for the child processes, where the entry is still needed to allow the parent process to read its child's exit status: once the exit status is read via the wait system call, the zombie's entry is removed from the process table and it is said to be "reaped".
    1. When a zombie is created (i.e. which happens when its parent exits, and therefore all chances of it ever being waited by it are gone), it is reparent to init, which is expected to reap it (which means calling wait on it).
    2. In other words, someone has to clean up after "irresponsible" parents that leave their children un-wait'ed, and that's PID 1's job.
    3. Have lost their parent (i.e. their parent exited as well), which means they'll never be waited on by their parent.

      He's supposedly defining a zombie process, but here ends up defining an orphan process, conflating the two.

    4. Now, unlike other processes, PID 1 has a unique responsibility, which is to reap zombie processes.
    1. A low-level approach is to fork twice, running the desired process in the grandchild, and immediately terminating the child. The grandchild process is now orphaned, and is not adopted by its grandparent, but rather by init.
    2. The process group mechanism in most Unix-like operating systems can be used to help protect against accidental orphaning, where in coordination with the user's shell will try to terminate all the child processes with the "hangup" signal (SIGHUP), rather than letting them continue to run as orphans.
    3. In a Unix-like operating system any orphaned process will be immediately adopted by an implementation-defined system process: the kernel sets the parent to this process
    4. Even though technically the process has a system process as its parent, it is still called an orphan process since the process that originally created it no longer exists.
    1. Let's look at a concrete example. Suppose that your container contains a web server that runs a CGI script that's written in bash. The CGI script calls grep. Then the web server decides that the CGI script is taking too long and kills the script, but grep is not affected and keeps running. When grep finishes, it becomes a zombie and is adopted by the PID 1 (the web server). The web server doesn't know about grep, so it doesn't reap it, and the grep zombie stays in the system.
  2. Oct 2022
    1. Ryan Holiday does touch on all parts of his writing process, but the majority of the video is devoted to the sorts of easier bikeshedding ideas that people are too familiar with (editing, proofreading, title choice, book cover choice). Hidden here is the process of researching, writing, notes, and actual organizing process which are the much harder pieces for the majority of writers. Hiding it does a massive disservice to those watching it for the most essential advice they're looking for.

  3. Sep 2022
    1. In fact, every timeone combines and recordsfacts in accordance withestablished logical process-es, the creative aspect ofthinking is concerned onlywith the selection of thedata and the process to beemployed, and the manip-ulation thereafter is repeti-tive in nature and hence afit matter to be relegatedto the machines

      I am not sure if I agree with this statement, since for every discipline, the details of manipulating the data, refining, and creatively thinking may be vastly different. Can one really confidently declare that after the selection of data, the manner of thinking and manipulation of specific data can be generalized?

  4. Jul 2022
    1. Worth taking a look at the various affordances of folders vs. links vs. tags.

      Some of these functionalities may be highly dependent on the particular tool in question and what affordances the tool allows for these ideas.

      Has anyone done this comprehensively across a number of tools other than threads in fora like reddit, zettelkasten.de, etc.?

      https://www.reddit.com/r/ObsidianMD/comments/vofakc/folders_vs_links_vs_tags/

  5. Jun 2022
    1. We’ve been taught that it’s important to work “with the end inmind.” We are told that it is our responsibility to deliver outcomes,whether that is a finished product on store shelves, a speechdelivered at an event, or a published technical document.

      Example of someone else saying this...

      We focus too much on the achievement and the end goal and the work and process doesn't receive its due.

  6. May 2022
    1. “This technique alsoexplains why I don’t think at all linearly and have trouble finding the right sequence ofchapters when writing a book, because indeed every chapter must reappear in everyother.”22
      1. Luhmann, Archimedes und wir , 145.

      Luhmann indicated that his note taking system made it difficult for him to be a linear thinker. Instead he felt that each chapter he wrote "must reappear in every other."

      This seems quite similar to Carl Linnaeus' work which he regularly recycled into future works.

    1. To produce meaningful work, and then forget about it, so you can move on to another and hopefully greater act of linear will.

      This completely loses the fact that two different areas of work can be used fruitfully in combinatorically creative ways to expand insight and knowledge. While you can loosely forget what is in your notes, the fact that they exist and are interlinked helps you resurface and reuse them. If you're not reusing and constantly linking them, then you're failing.

  7. Apr 2022
    1. in reality pretty much everyone out there has some messiness in their graph and that's okay

      Newcomers to note taking practice using tools like Roam Research, Obsidian, Logseq, et al. often see very nice and clean-cut toy examples of note collections which are impeccably linked and maintained. This may also be the case for those who publish their notes (or portions thereof) in public settings on the web. In reality, this sort of rigidness and beautifully manicured practice almost never happens. There are varying levels of messiness in actual people's notes. Beginners should be aware of this and not hold themselves to too high a standard and use this as an excuse not to practice and get their work done.

    1. lack of common learning goals among the student

    2. Institutions may supply learning environments that facilitate social interaction and collaboration and assure effective support to students with technological difficulties. Technological difficulties can cause student frustration as well as communication problems, which hamper collaborative processes such as explanations, sharing answers, and negotiation (Ragoonaden & Bordeleau, 2000).

    1. https://twitter.com/shreyas/status/1517207721866452992

      It took me a long time (probably more than 7-8 years of working in the industry) to get somewhat decent at capturing notes in meetings.<br><br>How can one get better at note taking? What has worked well for you? What do good note takers do particularly well?

      — Shreyas Doshi (@shreyas) April 21, 2022
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

      This question and the responses are an interesting snapshot of note taking practices, particularly for work related meetings.

  8. Mar 2022
    1. nicholas lerman is a sample of one 01:09:54 and if the zerocarton is a tool for thinking there are all these other thinkers out there who are thinking um and do we know how they're thinking how their 01:10:07 how you know what note systems are they using i'd like to i'd like to be able to place lerman yeah amongst all these others and and sort of in the zerocast and 01:10:23 see what others are doing as well and yeah i mean if there was one project i would have loved to do is going around 01:10:36 asking everyone i whose work i admire how do you do it how do you do it exactly what do you do in the morning how do you sit down how do you digest the books you're reading 01:10:48 um i was obsessed with the idea and it's just because i'm too shy to follow up on that

      Some discussion of doing research on zettelkasten methods and workflows.


      What do note taking methods and processes look like for individual people?


      What questions would one ask for this sort of research in an interview setting (compared to how one would look at extant physical examples in document-based research)? #openquestions


      Link this to the work of Earle Havens on commonplace books through portions of history.

  9. Feb 2022
    1. I used to use Roam for lots of things: a daily diary, book notes, keeping track of lists like my todo list, and taking meeting notes.Today, this is my stack:Daily Diary / paper notebookBook Notes / split between Roam and MuseTo-do List / ThingsMeeting Notes / Apple Notes

      An example of a user who is (no longer) centralizing everything into one place. Also an example of a person overloading their use of note taking tool as a melting pot of data. Do they have a mental map of how to separate the pieces to get the value out of their system?

      It seems like they want it to "just work" without any conception of what this looks like

    2. After some time though, reality started to sink in. ‘I am not really going back through all of these notes as often as I thought I would.’

      Example of someone not using the system as it may have been intended. Visiting one's notes on a somewhat frequent basis should be part of one's regular practice.

      If you're not doing anything with what you read, why are you reading it? Similarly, if you're not doing anything with your notes, why bother taking them?

      Naturally, creating notes certainly has a valuable use for learning, but to get the most out of them revisiting and linking them has other value, based on one's need.

      Missing in this article is a specific use case for why the writer is taking notes at all.

    1. There is one reliable sign if you managedto structure your workflow according to the fact that writing is not alinear process, but a circular one: the problem of finding a topic isreplaced by the problem of having too many topics to write about.

      Writing is a circular generative process and not a finite, linear one.

    1. Informal observations include direct observations of our own and others’ behavior as well as secondhand observations from non-scientific sources such as newspapers, books, blogs, and so on. For example, you might notice that you always seem to be in the slowest moving line at the grocery store. Could it be that most people think the same thing? Or you might read in a local newspaper about people donating money and food to a local family whose house has burned down and begin to wonder about who makes such donations and why. Some of the most famous research in psychology has been inspired by informal observations.

      Tenicia Daniels: This is interesting. Informal observations have guided me in curiosity and lead to exploration in random fields of interest. Like signing up to run the 2017NYC marathon. Therefore, connecting research inspiration with day-to-day life decision making, seems to resemble the same thinking.

  10. Jan 2022
    1. A Mental Squeeze Point is when your unsorted knowledge becomes so messy it overwhelms and discourages you. Either you are equipped with frameworks to overcome the squeeze point, or you are discouraged and possibly abandon your project.

      Cross reference: https://hypothes.is/a/BuMcAnr4EeyxO-PwNBfPrg (Dan Allosso's analogy about the Kuiper Belt)

  11. Nov 2021
    1. ot its deepestlevelW whatever the mediumW note taking involves variations on and comXbinations of a few basic maneuversW which w propose to identify as the fourSsh storingW sortingW summarizingW and selectin

      Ann M. Blair categorizes four variations of note taking which she calls the four Ss:

      • storing
      • sorting
      • summarizing
      • selecting

      (In a modern context, one might also expand this to a fifth and include sharing.)

  12. Sep 2021
    1. Run the Rails server (bin/rails s) and the Webpack Dev Server (bin/webpack-dev-server) via your preferred method. Two terminal tabs will work or create a Procfile and run via overmind or foreman.
  13. Jul 2021
    1. There is no inactive learning, just as there is no inactive reading.

      This underlies the reason why the acceleration of the industrial revolution has applied to so many areas, but doesn't apply to the acceleration of learning.

      Learning is a linear process.

    1. Ralph Waldo Emerson, the man who encouraged his friend Thoreau to start a journal and the man who had the most success with the journal > lecture > essay > book method, kept elaborate notebooks just for indexing his other notebooks.
  14. Jun 2021
    1. There is one very important reason for enabling job control to be useful inside scripts: the side-effect it has of placing background processes in their own process groups. This makes it much, much easier to send signels to them and their children with one simple command: kill -<signal> -$pgid. All other ways of dealing with signaling entire trees of processes either involve elaborate (sometimes even recursive) functions, which are often bugnests, or risk killing the parent in the process (no pun intended).
    1. Process based parallelisation is simpler than thread based due to well, the GIL on MRI rubies and lack of 100% thread safety within the other gems. (I'm fairly certain for example that there are threaded bugs lurking within the mocks code).
    1. Parallel testing in this implementation utilizes forking processes over threads. The reason we (tenderlove and eileencodes) chose forking processes over threads is forking will be faster with single databases, which most applications will use locally. Using threads is beneficial when tests are IO bound but the majority of tests are not IO bound.
  15. Feb 2021
    1. The rsync and sleep commands (the sleep is just an example) are run through exec to prevent the creation of zombie processes if I kill the parent script while they're running, and each potentially-long-running command is wrapped in its own subshell so that when exec finishes, it won't terminate the whole script.
  16. Dec 2020
  17. Aug 2020
    1. It’s not that Slack is too distracting and killing individual productivity. It’s that your company’s processes are so dysfunctional you need Slack to be distracting and killing individual productivity.

      Kwok points out that Slack's reputation for being a productivity killer doesn't get at the root of the issue. He argues that resorting to Slack is a symptom of the underlying cause: dysfunctional business processes.

  18. Jun 2020
  19. May 2020
    1. If any Firefox engineers are reading this, please don't try to subvert the above workaround, it requires multiple steps and administrator rights to set up, and we must all agree that it is of little sense for Firefox to try defending against unwanted programs or malware that has root access on the device.
  20. Apr 2020
  21. Sep 2019
    1. scientists are uncovering and debating an increasing array of other evolutionary processes at work in bacteria, some of which are suspiciously Lamarckian in character4–6
  22. Mar 2019
    1. A composite process, remember, is organized from both human processes and computer processes

      Human-system/Tool-system fine-grained intersections and compositionalities. There are UX and UI levels here. There are likely further levels having to do with intentionalities of (semi-) autonomous Tool Systems, how they are to be guided by Human intentionalities, and - most importantly - how humans fully ascertain and guide their own intentionalities.

  23. Jan 2019
    1. osthumanism as an attempt to engage humans asdistributed processes rather than as discrete entities. In

      just like a distributed computer system uses more than one computer to run an application, this is the notion that the idea of "human" is social/communal, and does not exist on the individual level.

  24. Sep 2018
    1. conditional distribution for individual components can be constructed

      So the conditional distribution is conditioned on other components?

    1. calculation once again involves inverting a NxN matrix as in the kernel space representation of regression

      this is why we use MCMC or other distribution sampling technique instead

    2. in equation B for the marginal of a gaussian, only the covariance of the block of the matrix involving the unmarginalized dimensions matters! Thus “if you ask only for the properties of the function (you are fitting to the data) at a finite number of points, then inference in the Gaussian process will give you the same answer if you ignore the infinitely many other points, as if you would have taken them all into account!”(Rasmunnsen)

      key insight into Gaussian processes

  25. May 2018
  26. Jan 2018
    1. The frequent assessment of the use of standardized leading practices and processes

      How can I monitor and evaluate the use of our project management processes and practices for better project performance?