685 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. The student doesn’t have a strong preference for any of these archetypes. Their notes serve a clear purpose that’s often based on a short-term priority (e.g, writing a paper or passing a test), with the goal to “get it done” as simply as possible.

      The typical student note taking method of transcribing, using (or often not using at all), and keeping notes is doomed to failure.

      Many students make the mistake of not making their own actual notes. By this I don't mean they're not writing information down. In fact many are writing information down, but we can't really call these notes. Notes by definition ought to transform something seen or heard into one's own words. Without the transformation, these students think that they're taking notes, but in reality they're focusing their efforts on being transcriptionists. They're attempting to capture something for later consumption. This is a deadly trap! By only transcribing, they're not taking advantage of transforming information by putting ideas down in their own words to test their understanding. Often worse, even if they do transcribe notes, they don't revisit them. If they do revisit them, they're simply re-reading them and not actively working with them. Only re-reading them will lead to the illusion that they're learning something when in fact they're falling into the mere-exposure effect.

      Students who are acting as transcriptionists would be better off simply reading a textbook and taking notes directly from that.

      A note that isn't revisited or revised, may as well be a note not taken. If we were to consider a spectrum of useful, valuable, and worthwhile notes, these notes would be at the lowest end of the spectrum.

      link to: https://hypothes.is/a/QgkL6IkIEeym7OeN9v9New

    1. notes don’t need to be comprehensive or precise
    2. The lengthand format don’t matter—if a piece of content has been interpretedthrough your lens, curated according to your taste, translated intoyour own words, or drawn from your life experience, and stored in asecure place, then it qualifies as a note.

      Forte's definition of a note.

    3. your Second Brain is a privateknowledge collection designed to serve a lifetime of learning andgrowth, not just a single use case

      Based on Tiago Forte's definition of a second brain the primary distinction from a commonplace book is solely that it is digital.

      Note here that he explicitly defines a second brain as being private. Historically commonplace books were private affairs though there are examples of them being shared from person to person as well as examples that have been printed.

  2. May 2022
    1. zany noun plural zanies Definition of zany (Entry 2 of 2) 1 : a subordinate clown or acrobat in old comedies who mimics ludicrously the tricks of the principal : merry-andrew 2 archaic : a person who fawns over another person : a servile follower : toady … must have known the falsehood of the slander which they encouraged their zanies to propagate.— William Gifford 3a : one who acts the buffoon to amuse others b : nut, kook

      I love this older definition of a zany.

      h/t:

      Vintage alphabet with images of food, flora, fauna, household items, various sundry items, and a murder clown. pic.twitter.com/MqWYKcmjzt

      — Michelle Krell Kydd (@glasspetalsmoke) May 25, 2021
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>
    1. The idea of Public Service Internet platforms is one of those alternatives, where “users manage their data, download and re-use their self-curated data for reuse on other platforms [… which] minimise and decentralise data storage and have no need to monetise and monitor Internet use” (Fuchs & Unterberger, 2021, p. 13).
    2. emancipatory communication seeks “to circumvent the politics of enclosure and control enacted by states, regulators, and corporations” (Milan, 2019 , p. 1)
    1. A*$#M981'&#4$'&$+"#$\ff\$#4'+'-&$-.$+"#$)*+,+%-."/01"&2314"**1+"Y$1&$]1)+^$H1*$=&4#)*+--4$+-$7#$]1$*,*+#C$-.$)=8#*$*#)('&2$+-$.10'8'+1+#$+"#$9#).-)C1&0#$-.$0#)+1'&$10+'-&*V^g

    Tags

    Annotators

    1. : low land that is covered wholly or partly with water unless artificially drained and that usually has peaty alkaline soil and characteristic flora (as of sedges and reeds)

      fen

      often heard in the phrase forests and fens

  3. Apr 2022
    1. the brain stores social information differently thanit stores information that is non-social. Social memories are encoded in a distinctregion of the brain. What’s more, we remember social information moreaccurately, a phenomenon that psychologists call the “social encodingadvantage.” If findings like this feel unexpected, that’s because our culturelargely excludes social interaction from the realm of the intellect. Socialexchanges with others might be enjoyable or entertaining, this attitude holds, butthey’re no more than a diversion, what we do around the edges of school orwork. Serious thinking, real thinking, is done on one’s own, sequestered fromothers.

      "Social encoding advantage" is what psychologists refer to as the phenomenon of people remembering social information more accurately than other types.

      Reference to read: “social encoding advantage”: Matthew D. Lieberman, Social: Why Our Brains Are Wired to Connect (New York: Crown, 2013), 284.

      It's likely that the social acts of learning and information exchange in oral societies had an additional stickiness over and beyond the additional mnemonic methods they would have used as a base.

      The Western cultural tradition doesn't value the social coding advantage because it "excludes social interaction from the realm of the intellect" (Paul, 2021). Instead it provides advantage and status to the individual thinking on their own. We greatly prefer the idea of the "lone genius" toiling on their own, when this is hardly ever the case. Our availability bias often leads us to believe it is the case because we can pull out so many famous examples, though in almost all cases these geniuses were riding on the shoulders of giants.

      Reference to read: remember social information more accurately: Jason P. Mitchell, C. Neil Macrae, and Mahzarin R. Banaji, “Encoding-Specific Effects of Social Cognition on the Neural Correlates of Subsequent Memory,” Journal of Neuroscience 24 (May 2004): 4912–17

      Reference to read: the brain stores social information: Jason P. Mitchell et al., “Thinking About Others: The Neural Substrates of Social Cognition,” in Social Neuroscience: People Thinking About Thinking People, ed. Karen T. Litfin (Cambridge: MIT Press, 2006), 63–82.

    2. a phenomenon that psychologists call “thecaricature advantage”: the fact that we recognize a caricatured face even morereadily than we recognize a true-to-life depiction. While a caricature does distortits subject’s actual appearance, it does so in a systematic way, exaggerating whatis unique or distinctive about that individual—thereby making him or her evenmore instantly identifiable.

      Exaggerating the features of people and objects in systematic ways helps people to more easily assimilate both knowledge about them as well as the ability to distinguish between them in an effect which psychologists call the "caricature advantage."

      Link this to using caricature as a mnemonic technique for strengthening one's memory of objects and people.

    3. In the course of teaching hundredsof first-year law students, Monte Smith, a professor and dean at Ohio StateUniversity’s law school, grew increasingly puzzled by the seeming inability ofhis bright, hardworking students to absorb basic tenets of legal thinking and toapply them in writing. He came to believe that the manner of his instruction wasdemanding more from them than their mental bandwidth would allow. Studentswere being asked to employ a whole new vocabulary and a whole new suite ofconcepts, even as they were attempting to write in an unaccustomed style and anunaccustomed form. It was too much, and they had too few mental resources leftover to actually learn.

      This same analogy also works in advanced mathematics courses where students are often learning dense and technical vocabulary and then moments later applying it directly to even more technical ideas and proofs.

      How might this sort of solution from law school be applied to abstract mathematics?

    1. Infrastructure is a socio-technical system rather than a technical product.

      This is great to see as so often infrastructure is considered to be only within a purely technical layer.

    2. Infrastructure is dynamic.

      Also key: A common view of infrastructure as more permanent structures like "roads and bridges", or even digital networks, shapes understanding away from infrastructure as a more dynamic socio-technical system.

    1. A filing system is indefinitely expandable, rhizomatic (at any point of timeor space, one can always insert a new card); in contradistinction with the sequen-tial irreversibility of the pages of the notebook and of the book, its interiormobility allows for permanent reordering (for, even if there is no narrative conclu-sion of a diary, there is a last page of the notebook on which it is written: its pagesare numbered, like days on a calendar).

      Most writing systems and forms force a beginning and an end, they force a particular structure that is both finite and limiting. The card index (zettelkasten) may have a beginning—there's always a first note or card, but it never has to have an end unless one's ownership is so absolute it ends with the life of its author. There are an ever-increasing number of ways to order a card index, though some try to get around this to create some artificial stability by numbering or specifically ordering their cards. New ideas can be accepted into the index at a multitude of places and are always internally mobile and re-orderable.

      link to Luhmann's works on describing this sort of rhizomatic behavior of his zettelkasten


      Within a network model framing for a zettelkasten, one might define thinking as traversing a graph of idea nodes in a particular order. Alternately it might also include randomly juxtaposing cards and creating links between ones which have similarities. Which of these modes of thinking has a higher order? Which creates more value? Which requires more work?

    1. One can “‘di-minish” a biographee, but not an eidolon.

      ei·do·lon /īˈdōlən/ noun: eidolon; plural noun: eidola; plural noun: eidolons : an idealized person or thing. : a specter or phantom.

      Origin early 19th century: from Greek eidōlon, from eidos ‘form’.

    Tags

    Annotators

    1. , as a key historical technology ofinvention. I intend this last term in the precise sense in which Derrida(1989) understands it, that is, as an oscillation between theperformative and the constative, with the former working to disruptitself (the performative) and the latter (the constative) – or whatmight be termed the unsettling operation of invention.

      Derrida's definition of invention

    1. ostension (or teaching by showing in person)
    2. We also have good studies of reporta-tiones, or the notes taken from oral events, such as sermons or lectures.25
    3. But it is more difficult in a world of manuscriptsthan in the era of printing to evaluate what constitutes a note—that is, a piece ofwriting not meant for circulation but for private use, say, as preparatory toward afinished work

      Based on this definition of a "note", one must wonder if my public notes here on Hypothes.is are then not notes as they are tacitly circulated publicly from the first use. However they are still specifically and distinctly preparatory towards some future finished work, I just haven't yet decided which ultimate work in which they'll appear.

    4. Genetic criti-cism seeks to reconstruct the creative process of great authors by examining thesuccession of working papers from reading notes to drafts and editorial changes.
    5. “Note-taking” is a general term that covers various kinds of writing in responseto listening, reading, or thinking, often in more or less direct preparation for theproduction of a composition or report (oral or written).

      Ann Blair's definition of note taking

    1. You might find that reviewing in Anki is harder than normal study. This means it’s working – Anki’s goal is to show you mostly the material you’re struggling with and the material you’re most likely to forget, so it will feel harder than an average study session where you study hard and easy material in more equal amounts. However, the difficulty and the number of cards you appear to be forgetting might make you feel like it’s not working. Give spaced repetition a few weeks and see how well you remember your content then; that’s the only way to really know how well it’s going. (This phenomenon is well-known and has a name, desirable difficulty.)

      Desirable difficulty is a learning task which one has a desire to know, but which is sufficiently difficult enough to be challenging. Spaced repetition systems, if properly filled with topics in which one has an interest, will surface the least well known material for revision and should provide a sufficient level of difficulty for learning.

      see also: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desirable_difficulty

  4. Mar 2022
    1. First, what do I mean by meta-stable? It’s in reference to an article by Scott H Young - 7 Rules for Staying Productive Long-Term. In it, Scott describes a concept in physics where something is stable but small perturbations can cause it to break, and not able to go back to its starting position after a small push. The example he gives is a pendulum, perfectly balanced at the top; when pushed will not return to its starting point. Contrast this with a pendulum’s other stable point, the bottom. When pushed, it’ll return to that starting point easily.

      Something is meta-stable if small perturbations won't cause it to break or be able to go back to its starting point.

      example: pendulum

    1. Paired-pulse facilitation

      A form of short-term, activity-dependent synaptic plasticity common to most chemically transmitting synapses, manifested as an enhancement in the amplitude of the second of two rapidly evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs).

    2. fiber volley amplitudes

      Needs definition.

    3. extracellular field excitatory post-synaptic potentials (fEPSPs)

      EPSPs that are generated by transient imbalances in ion concentrations in the spaces outside the cells, that result from cellular electrical activity.

    4. Schaffer collateral

      Axon collaterals given off by CA3 pyramidal cells in the hippocampus.

    5. theta bursts

      short bursts of stimulation that more closely mimic the natural rhythms of activity in the neurons of the brain at high frequencies, with the bursts themselves being applied 5 times per second.

    6. radial arm maze task

      A maze task that measures spatial memory and learning in rats.

    7. vascularization

      The process of growing blood vessels into a tissue to improve oxygen and nutrient supply.

    1. But it’s also the calculation a woman makes before responding to the e-mail of the failson who was just promoted ahead of her, or the calculation I make when a white executive comments on my Twitter feed but not my published columns.

      Noting the rise in the use of the word failson.

    1. archaea what strata me which looked at how ancient civilizations understood

      archaeoastronomy : the study of ancient or traditional astronomies in their cultural context, utilizing archaeological and anthropological evidence.

      sometimes also spelled archeoastronomy

    1. A writer collective is a set of editorial and financial structures designed to give writers the autonomy and upside that they get from writing alone, and the support and security they get from working for a media company. 

      If the "whole is greater than the sum of its parts" who benefits from the excess value and how is that economically broken up in a fair manner?

    1. Lemmata from the main text are underlined in red, and the commentary is provided after.

      : lemmata ; a heading indicating the subject or argument of a literary composition, an annotation, or a dictionary entry.

    1. schadenfreude

      Pleasure derived by someone from another person's misfortune.

    2. inf rahumanization

      The tacitly held belief that one's ingroup is more human than an outgroup, which is less human.

    3. derogation

      The perception or treatment of someone or something as being of little worth.

    Tags

    Annotators

    1. 1. Multiple strong symbols are not allowed○ Each item can be defined only once2. Given a strong symbol and multiple weak symbols, choose the strong symbol○ References to the weak symbol resolve to the strong symbol3. If there are multiple weak symbols, pick an arbitrary one

      linker 如何解决重复符号定义的问题?

    1. Indigenous astronomy focuses on the empirical, scientificlayers of this knowledge, and Traditions refer to the social practices,cultural activities, and methods of transmitting and applying thisknowledge.
    2. Star knowledge is the body of knowledge aboutthe celestial realm and how it relates to a people, their land and theirculture.
    3. UNESCO broadly defines Indigenous Knowledge as ‘theunderstandings, skills and philosophies developed by [Indigenous]cultures and societies with long histories of interaction with theirnatural surroundings’.
    4. In the western Torres Strait, an astronomer is called a ZugubauMabaig, which literally translates as ‘star person’.
    5. These ways of knowinghave inherent value and are leading Western scientists to betterunderstand celestial phenomena and the history and heritage thisconstitutes for all people.

      The phrase "ways of knowing" is fascinating and seems to have a particular meaning across multiple contexts.

      I'd like to collect examples of its use and come up with a more concrete definition for Western audiences.

      How close is it to the idea of ways (or methods) of learning and understanding? How is it bound up in the idea of pedagogy? How does it relate to orality and memory contrasted with literacy? Though it may not subsume the idea of scientific method, the use, evolution, and refinement of these methods over time may generally equate it with the scientific method.

      Could such an oral package be considered a learning management system? How might we compare and contrast these for drawing potential equivalencies of these systems to put them on more equal footing from a variety of cultural perspectives? One is not necessarily better than another, but we should be able to better appreciate what each brings to the table of world knowledge.

    1. aryballos

      An aryballos (Greek: ἀρύβαλλος; plural aryballoi) was a small spherical or globular flask with a narrow neck used in Ancient Greece. It was used to contain perfume or oil, and is often depicted in vase paintings being used by athletes during bathing.—Wikipedia

    1. To signify that an angle is acute, Jeffreys taught them, “make Pac-Man withyour arms.” To signify that it is obtuse, “spread out your arms like you’re goingto hug someone.” And to signify a right angle, “flex an arm like you’re showingoff your muscle.” For addition, bring two hands together; for division, make akarate chop; to find the area of a shape, “motion as if you’re using your hand asa knife to butter bread.”

      Math teacher Brendan Jeffreys from the Auburn school district in Auburn, WA created simple hand gestures to accompany or replace mathematical terms. Examples included making a Pac-Man shape with one's arms to describe an acute angle, spreading one's arms wide as if to hug someone to indicate an obtuse angle, or flexing your arm to show your muscles to indicate a right triangle. Other examples included a karate chop to indicate division or a motion imitating using a knife to butter bread to indicate finding the area of a shape.

    2. Washington State mathteacher Brendan Jeffreys turned to gesture as a way of easing the mental loadcarried by his students, many of whom come from low-income households,speak English as a second language, or both. “Academic language—vocabularyterms like ‘congruent’ and ‘equivalent’ and ‘quotient’—is not something mystudents hear in their homes, by and large,” says Jeffreys, who works for theAuburn School District in Auburn, a small city south of Seattle. “I could see thatmy kids were stumbling over those words even as they were trying to keep trackof the numbers and perform the mathematical operations.” So Jeffreys devised aset of simple hand gestures to accompany, or even temporarily replace, theunfamiliar terms that taxed his students’ ability to carry out mental math.

      Mathematics can often be more difficult compared to other subjects as students learning new concepts are forced not only to understand entirely new concepts, but simultaneously are required to know new vocabulary to describe those concepts. Utilizing gestures to help lighten the cognitive load of the new vocabulary to allow students to focus on the concepts and operations can be invaluable.

  5. Feb 2022
    1. https://brainbaking.com/post/2021/10/are-digital-gardens-blogs/

      We definitely need better definitions of digital gardens (public or otherwise) to delineate them from blogs, zettelkasten, wikis, social media, and other forms of information exchange.

      Wouter Groeneveld describes some of his thoughts here.

      Link to notes from https://collect.readwriterespond.com/are-digital-gardens-blogs/

    2. Public digital gardens are overrated. They are very hard to navigate. Time and time again, I get lost in the jungle of mystical links, in the check-ins drowned in the bookmarks and the quotes. Fancy IndieWeb sites that boast 5 separate RSS feeds to “help” navigate the labyrinth do not make it better. I’ve tried following multiple interesting people that pump loads and loads of seemingly cool looking stuff into their site. It always ends in confusion. Yes, sometimes I discover a link to another published article (external to the garden, by the way!) that is interesting. As admiring as the garden is, the things they grow there are almost always puzzling.

      Wouter Groeneveld here is mixing up a digital garden and a blog with social media enhancements. I personally wouldn't expect a digital garden to necessarily have features like checkins, bookmarks, etc. Ideally it would be a mix of of a zettelkasten with atomic ideas and notes and a wiki structure with somewhat longer articles and ideas strung together.

      From this definition, my personal website definitely isn't a "digital garden" but a blog with a variety of social media features built in. Looking at some smaller subsets of my website, one might consider it to be a digital garden.

      An additional piece of digital gardening also has to do with actually tending the garden, which I generally don't do in my website the way I do in my Obsidian vault. My vault is more like a digital garden which has many streams of data coming into it and being regularly tended.

      This is another example of the broader space of these ideas being mixed together in a hodgepodge without clear definitions of what each are.

    1. barrel cortex

      A region of the somatosensory cortex that is identifiable in some rodents.

    2. metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR)

      Indirect, slowly acting (metabotropic) excitatory (glutamate) receptors that have some sort of effect on LTP. Needs explanation.

    3. CA1

      CA1 sub-region of the hippocampus.

    4. high-frequency LTP (200 Hz

      Needs explanation.

    5. CA3

      CA3 sub-region of the hippocampus.

    6. mossy fiber LTP

      LTP that occurs at the so-called "mossy fiber synapses" of the hippocampus, which is a specific group of synapses that is involved with encoding short-term memory.

    7. proactive interference

      Memory of past experiences interfering with an individual's ability to hold new information in working memory.

    8. metaplastic

      A change in the physiological or biochemical state of neurons such that the ability to generate synaptic plasticity is altered.

    9. intrinsic excitability

      Electrical excitability of a particular neuron.

    10. NMDA receptor(NMDAR)

      Receptors important for learning and memory.

    1. the fear of failure has the ugliest name of all phobias:Kakorrhaphiophobia.

      Kakorrhaphiophobia: the fear of failure

    2. you can’t force insight into a preconceiveddirection

      By its own definition, insight cannot be forced, much less forced in a particular direction.

    3. Project-related notes can be: · comments in the manuscript· collections of project-related literature· outlines· snippets of drafts· reminders· to-do lists· and of course the draft itself.

      Project notes can be kept in folders either inside or outside of the zettelkasten itself, but they technically shouldn't be a permanent part of it. Perhaps it's better to think of them as a workbench or play space for ideas as they're forming into a finished piece of writing. Once the piece is done, the play space has served its purpose and can be cleaned up.

    4. an archive – the bin for the indecisive

      An archive is a trash can for the indecisive.

  6. Jan 2022
    1. A Mental Squeeze Point is when your unsorted knowledge becomes so messy it overwhelms and discourages you. Either you are equipped with frameworks to overcome the squeeze point, or you are discouraged and possibly abandon your project.

      Cross reference: https://hypothes.is/a/BuMcAnr4EeyxO-PwNBfPrg (Dan Allosso's analogy about the Kuiper Belt)

    1. Point being (again), definitions seem to differ, and what you call "full stack" is what I call "batteries-included framework". Full stack simply means (for me) that it gives you a way of building frontend and backend code, but implies nothing about what functionality is included in either part.
    1. The term autopoiesis (from Greek αὐτo- (auto-) 'self', and ποίησις (poiesis) 'creation, production') refers to a system capable of producing and maintaining itself by creating its own parts.[1] The term was introduced in the 1972 publication Autopoiesis and Cognition: The Realization of the Living by Chilean biologists Humberto Maturana and Francisco Varela to define the self-maintaining chemistry of living cells.[2] Since then the concept has been also applied to the fields of cognition, systems theory, architecture and sociology.

      I can't help but think about a quine here...

    1. Definition of adversaria 1 : commentaries or notes (as on a text or document) 2 : a miscellaneous collection of notes, remarks, or selections : commonplace book
    1. The hipster is an enfant terrible turned inside out.

      “Born 1930: The Unlost Generation” by Caroline Bird, Harper’s Bazaar, Feb. 1957

      Definition of the "hipster"

    1. I went to Portland, Oregon, to interview Prof Joel Nigg, who is one of the leading experts in the world on children’s attention problems, and he told me we need to ask if we are now developing “an attentional pathogenic culture” – an environment in which sustained and deep focus is harder for all of us.

      : attentional pathogenic culture ; an environment in which sustained and deep focus is harder for all of us

    1. The scientific consensus has shifted so much that Richard Dawkins, in the 30th-anniversary edition of “The Selfish Gene,” wrote that he could just as accurately have called his book “The Cooperative Gene.” Perhaps decades of our economic and political lives would have been much less harmful if he had.

      I do like the more positive framing of "The Cooperative Gene."

  7. Dec 2021
    1. The hay(na)ku is a 21st century poetic form invented by Eileen R. Tabios. It is a six-word tercet with the first line being one word, the second line being two words, and the third line being three words. An example: … blueness of sky— I am breathing
    1. “Liberal” just means free and disinterested. It means that inquiry is pursued without fear or favor, regardless of the outcome and whatever the field of study.

      Definition of a "liberal education"

    1. reap’d

      To collect crop. Contraction of "reaped."

    2. bourn

      A small stream. Usually with this form, referring to the hills covered in chalk in southern England.

    3. granary

      A storage barn for grain that has already been separated from the plant.

    4. thatch-eves

      The edge of a roof covered in straw.

    5. bourn

      A small stream. Usually with this form, referring to the hills covered in chalk in southern England.

    6. granary

      A storage barn for grain that has already been separated from the plant.

    7. thatch-eves

      The edge of a roof covered in straw.

    8. reap’d

      To collect crop. Contraction of "reaped."

    9. granary

      A storage barn for grain that has already been separated from the plant.

    10. thatch-eves

      The edge of a roof covered in straw.

    1. In the field of topology, homology is the formal way to count holes. Homology associates to each shape an algebraic object, which can be used to extract information like the number of holes in each dimension.

      A relatively simple definition of homology and what it is.

  8. Nov 2021
    1. The original critical race theorists argued for the use of a new lens to interpret the past and the present. You can dispute whether or not that lens is useful, or whether you want to look through it at all

      This is an important thing to say about critical race theory when the far conservative right is using it as a cudgel and boogeyman for all of society's problems.

    2. Partisans, especially on the right, now toss around the phrase cancel culture when they want to defend themselves from criticism, however legitimate.

      A solid definition of cancel culture.

  9. Sep 2021
    1. Bounded seasare a context-sensitive extension inspired by island grammars, whichprovides composable, robust, reusable and easy way to extract information fromsource code (see chapter 5).
    1. Proof-of-work methods (e.g. blockchains) are harmful for sustainability (s12y).

      First time I've seen s12y as abbreviation for sustainability.

      Also makes me wonder if I should make sesquipedaliantly into s15y? It would be more fun if it were s18y so that the 18 could refer to 12+6 inches which is a foot and a half matching up with sesquipedalian's root definition.

  10. Aug 2021
    1. I am beginning to think that the significant difference is that with songlines, learning is always done in the physical ‘memory palace’ which is constantly revisited. It can be recalled from memory, but is encoded in place. For me, that is way more effective, but I have aphantasia and very poor visualisation, so it may not be as big a factor for others. So recalling your childhood home can be a memory palace, but not a songline.

      Lynne Kelly is correct here that we need better delineations of the words we're using here.

      To some of us, we're taking historical methods and expanding them into larger super sets based on our personal experiences. I've read enough of Kelly's work and her personal experiences on her website (and that of many others) that I better understand the shorthand she uses when she describes pieces.

      Even in the literature throughout the middle ages and the Renaissance we see this same sort of picking and choosing of methods in descriptions of various texts. Some will choose to focus on one or two keys, which seemed to work for them, but they'd leave out the others which means that subsequent generations would miss out on the lost bits and pieces.

      Having a larger superset of methods to choose from as well as encouraging further explorations is certainly desired.

  11. Jul 2021
    1. Just America is a narrative of the young and well educated, which is why it continually misreads or ignores the Black and Latino working classes.

      the participants of "Just America"

    2. The term identity politics was born in 1977, when a group of Black lesbian feminists called the Combahee River Collective released a statement defining their work as self-liberation from the racism and sexism of “white male rule”:
    3. Real America isn’t a shining city on a hill with its gates open to freedom-loving people everywhere. Nor is it a cosmopolitan club to which the right talents and credentials will get you admitted no matter who you are or where you’re from. It’s a provincial village where everyone knows everyone’s business, no one has much more money than anyone else, and only a few misfits ever move away. The villagers can fix their own boilers, and they go out of their way to help a neighbor in a jam. A new face on the street will draw immediate attention and suspicion.

      A reasonable definition of "Real America".

    1. I’m quite interested in concepts of the “Small Web” and adjacent topics, but it is definitely true that “small web” itself is a vague term that different people use to talk about different kinds of projects. What unites all these different concepts is the kind of web they define themselves against; that kind of bloated, corporate, algorithm-ruled and ad-ridden mess that constitutes the majority of highly-trafficked websites these days.

      It would definitely be better if there were also a proactive, positive definition of what the small web were for rather than against.

      It's better to have definitions in both directions to better delineate what's included and what's excluded.

  12. Jun 2021
    1. a labor-based grading system produces your final course grade by focusing on how much labor, or effort, you do in this course. The more labor you do, the higher your final course grade will be, regardless of what anyone thinks of the products of that labor.

      Definition of a labor-based grading system. It's pretty much what one might suspect.

      The underlying supposition is that doing some work at improvement will help one learn and improve.

      The missing assumptions may include which sorts of work are best? Do they work for some students and not others? What sorts of work for specific tasks might improve performance and output(s)?

    1. There is also a principled critique of meritocracy, although it is far less common. Principled critics argue that any society where socioeconomic reward is based on the principle of “merit” itself is inherently unjust. For them, the ideal of meritocracy is flawed and must be replaced either by radical egalitarianism or a return to aristocracy.

      principled critique of meritocracy

    1. A memex is a device in which an individual stores all his books, records, and communications, and which is mechanized so that it may be consulted with exceeding speed and flexibility. It is an enlarged intimate supplement to his memory.

      His definition of a Memex is simply a mechanized (or what we would now call digitized) commonplace book, which has a long history in the literature of knowledge management.


      I'll note here that he's somehow still stuck on the mechanical engineering idea of mechanized. Despite the fact that he was the advisor to Claude Shannon, father of the digital revolution, he is still thinking in terms of mechanical pipes, levers, and fluids. He literally had Shannon building a computer out of pipes and fluid while he was a student at MIT.

  13. Apr 2021
    1. The Cozy web is Venkatesh Rao's term for the private, gatekeeper bounded spaces of the internet we have all retreated to over the last few years.
    1. recension

      re·cen·sion

      /rəˈsen(t)SH(ə)n/

      noun

      noun: recension; plural noun: recensions

      a revised edition of a text; an act of making a revised edition of a text.

      Example "under the Carolingians new recensions of the code were made"

      Origin mid 17th century (in the sense ‘survey, review’): from Latin recensio(n- ), from recensere ‘revise’, from re- ‘again’ + censere ‘to review’.

      See also: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Recension

    1. This is the culture that finds the idea of ten year old essays still being relevant so jarring that instead of just referring to collections of these essays as the field’s ‘canon’ they invent a new phrase that’s based on a misunderstanding of a casual heuristic observation: “Lindy Libraries” or “Lindy Media”. Basically, texts that are likely to last as long as they have lasted so far.

      What is a Lindy Library? This is the first reference to it as a "thing" that I've seen.

      Perhaps these references may be useful?

      After a brief look, it appears as if the last is the appropriate reference.

  14. Mar 2021
    1. Retros

      Something about the shortening of retrospectives is bothering me here. While perhaps a useful shorthand, it's bordering on becoming lingo here and really isn't necessary. It's more alienating rather than useful.

    1. The scholars Nick Couldry and Ulises Mejias have called it “data colonialism,” a term that reflects our inability to stop our data from being unwittingly extracted.

      I've not run across data colonialism before.

    1. the IndieWeb, a group of hipsters with websites trying to take down THE MAN (aka the “corporate web”).
    1. Maybe this was the love part of the story: Two people collaborating on a solution to a problem occupying space often unnoticed but always felt.

      A good definition of a love story.

    1. It’s become the preferred platform for men who can’t work in diverse environments without getting calls from HR. 

      This is a damning definition of Substack

    1. Health, argues Illich, is the capacity to cope with the human reality of death, pain, and sickness.

      An off-the-beaten-path definition.

    1. scunnered

      scunnered A Scots word used to mean that you are world weary, down-trodden, and thoroughly bereft of any lust for life when these words and expressions are simply too inadequate to signify the magnitude of your slide into "shitdom". Example: "Having to pay 550 euros to the locksmith on an emergency call out really scunnered him."

    1. I decided I'd make my content available with a CC BY-NC-SA (Attribution, Non-commercial, Share Alike) license, so that people could freely use and adapt my stuff, but would need to cite me as its source, make their content that was based on my work available for free, and slap a similar license on it. This is important, I think, to prevent the materials that educators make and contribute freely to the community STAY FREE. Without these stipulations (NC and SA), it would be possible for a commercial textbook company, for example, to grab the content I've created and add it to their "walled garden" of content which is technically free, but requires an expensive subscription to GET TO. This is a subversion of the Open idea which a lot of commercial publishers have tried, to reduce their cost of content and make themselves seem hip and up to date. The community calls it Openwashing.

      A good description of openwashing. I've seen some examples of the practice in the wild, but should make a note to document some.

    1. Because “open” may face a similar fate as befell “design” and “innovation,” terms that are alternatively inspiring and incomprehensible, both motivation and muddled jargon.

      "Information" is another word that might fit into this group of over-saddled words.

    2. In terms of defining the “open” in open web annotation, I tend to take a standards approach: the Hypothes.is tool is built upon, and our organization advocates for, open standards in web annotation.

      This explanation also highlights an additional idea of open itself. I have heard many in the W3C space criticize the open standard of web annotation arrived at because of the ultimate monoculture of the space. Most of the participants of the process were all related to Hypothes.is in some way and the result was a single product that implemented the standard. To my knowledge no other companies, groups, or individual programmers have separately implemented the standard.

      In this sense, while the "standard" is openly defined, it isn't as open as other standards which were mote slowly evolved and implemented gradually and more broadly by various programming languages and disparate groups.

    1. The practice of throwing a bunch of purloined user names and passwords at various services to see what sticks is known as credential stuffing, and it’s hit the media industry particularly hard in recent years.

      I don't think I've ever seen a name for this practice before.

    1. He introduces the idea of the apophatic: what we can't put into words, but is important and vaguely understood. This term comes from Orthodox theology, where people defined god by saying what it was not.

      Too often as humans we're focused on what is immediately in front of us and not what is missing.

      This same thing plagues our science in that we're only publishing positive results and not negative results.

      From an information theoretic perspective, we're throwing away half (or more?) of the information we're generating. We might be able to go much farther much faster if we were keeping and publishing all of our results in better fashion.

      Is there a better word for this negative information? #openquestions

    1. Drongos are artists, dreamers, goofballs, weirdos, hooligans, fools, outsiders, hedonists, and flaneurs.
    1. "So capitalism created social media. Literally social life, but mediated by ad sellers." https://briefs.video/videos/why-the-indieweb/

      Definition of social media: social life, but mediated by capitalistic ad sellers online.

    1. Ten years later, Reiser & Dempsey (2007) defined instructional design as a “systematic process that is employed to develop education and training programs in a consistent and reliable fashion” (pg. 11).
    2. Instructional Design-as-Science:

      To me, ID sounds more like falling in the art category than science. The art of creating a smooth flow of knowledge generating or skills enhancement throughout a course.

    3. AECT

      Association for Educational Communication I had no idea that such an organization does exist!

  15. Feb 2021
    1. Uber is a "bezzle" – JK Galbraith's name for "the magic interval when a confidence trickster knows he has the money he has appropriated but the victim does not yet understand that he has lost it." Uber is a scam and it will never be profitable.

      bezzle

      related to embezzle?

    1. But it also puts many of my students at risk for stereotype threat, in which students’ performance suffers because they fear their mistakes will be seen as representative of their entire race or gender.
  16. onedrive.live.com onedrive.live.com
    1. squalor.

      the state of being extremely dirty and unpleasant, especially as a result of poverty or neglect

    2. sabbatical

      a period of paid leave granted to a university teacher or other worker for study or travel, traditionally one year for every seven years worked

    3. acrid

      sharp or biting to the taste or smell; bitterly pungent; irritating to the eyes, nose, etc.

    4. circumvention

      the process of avoiding something, especially cleverly or illegally

    5. destitution

      poverty so extreme that one lacks the means to provide for oneself

    6. imminence

      the state or fact of being about to happen

    7. retched

      vomit

    8. muzzled

      Muzzle (verb) - Prevent someone from expressing themselves freely. (43)

    9. augury

      a sign of what will happen in the future; an omen

    10. indunas

      a tribal councillor or headman

    11. dragnet

      a systematic search for someone or something, especially criminals or criminal activity

    12. ninny

      a foolish and weak person

    13. derisively

      expressing or causing contemptuous ridicule or scorn

    14. consternation

      amazement or dismay that hinders or throws into confusion

    15. insurrection

      an act or instance of revolting against civil authority or an established government

    16. akimbo

      with hands on the hips and elbows turned outwards

    17. irruptions

      a sudden, violent, or forcible entry

    18. casus belli

      an act or situation that provokes or justifies a war

    19. ignominy

      public shame or disgrace

    1. There is one particular similarity between evidentials and hyperlinks I find intriguing, and that is their function as deictics. ‘Deictic’ is the fancy linguist word for ‘pointing’.
    1. We have “limbic capitalism” which “preys on our addicted brains”, with vast amounts of money invested into making sites and apps more addictive so subjects view more adverts, with some people even claiming this has created a new generation with shorter attention spans and less focus and concentration than ever before.

      This is the first time I've seen a reference to limbic capitalism as a term. Not a bad word for the concept.

    1. as the generation of numerous original ideas, we recognize that creative thought involves the selection of appropriate ideas to move forward

      DOI: Creativity defined in two ways; 1st as generation of numerous original ideas, and 2nd as the selection from those ideas of appopriate ideas to move forward.

      Really shows true creativity is found in the 2nd definition and is not just about idea generation but the ability to select the best idea of the list to move forward with, this is creativity.

    1. Innovative learning, on the other hand, refers to becoming familiar with unfamiliar situations that have no clear precedent for action, or with managing familiar situations in better ways, such as seeking alternative solutions to existing problems.

      This innovative learning is clearly important for designers. I think that modifying an existing situation to try and make it better would be far easier than a completely unfamiliar one. This lends itself to more creativity due to no clear previous path.

    1. (1) gaining the attention of the learners, (2) demonstrating the relevance of the instruction to the learners, (3) instilling learners with confidence to succeed with the instruction, and (4) deriving satisfaction when they do.

      This model is a great way to ensure engagement with learners. Specifically part 2 and 3 stuck out to me as key. The second point was that we must demonstrate relevance of instruction. This is fixes that question that always seems to come up, "Why are we doing this if I'll never use it in real life?". Any time I preface a lesson with why we are learning something and how it is necessary in our lives my students always seem to receive it better. Part 3 noted that we must instill confidence to succeed. Giving students the confidence to try hard things is vital to success.

  17. Jan 2021
    1. WhatsApp rose by trapping previously-free beings in their corral and changing their habits to create dependence on masters. Over time, this made it difficult or impossible to return to their previous lifestyle. That process should sound familiar: it’s eerily similar to the domestication of animals. I call this type of vendor lock-in user domestication: the removal of user autonomy to trap users into serving vendors.

      This is a good definition of "user domestication". Such an apt metaphor.

    1. An invisible hand process is at work if individual human action results in some sort of order that was not specifically designed by those individuals pursuing their own ends. But in order for the invisible hand to operate well, institutions need to be in place for otherwise the human action at play could result in chaos (no order at all).
  18. Nov 2020
    1. Moreover, there are strikingly contrasting presuppositions within the social sciences toward culture: Too often, culture is treated as a residual once the “hard” economic, political, and sociological factors are considered. Alternatively, it can become the all-encompassing construct that supposedly explains everything. Similarly, culture is seen as something that either prohibits or accelerates progress, or it becomes a politically innocent reference category to paint over increasingly absent shared values and common narratives

      Culture as a site of contestation!

    1. Yet from the responses to those posts, it’s become clear that for many people, maybe even most, this is not ‘obvious’ at all

      Worth taking a look at the so-called product centric-mindset, the mainstream approach in pretty much every technology startup: people are designing/building/launching/growing the product, in roles such as product manager, product designer, product engineer, product lead, product marketing specialist, etc. Funny paradoxical thing is that many of these businesses can be characterised to have a SaaS business model, as in Software-as-a-Service.

      When we take a closer look at the Service Design community, we will often hear that "Everything is a service" as these days every product is bundled into a service.

      I came across quite a few times about the Rolls Royce case study presenting the aero-engine business model: aircraft engine business model - Google Search

  19. Oct 2020
    1. interlocutor

      person who takes part in conversation

    2. re-lational artifact, a computational object explicitly designed to engage a user in a re-lationship

      relational artifact = for user relationship

    3. watershed

      unique

    Tags

    Annotators

  20. Aug 2020
  21. Jul 2020
    1. DESIGN is the creation of a plan to build an object, system, or human interaction. DIVERSITY is quantitative. It’s the composition of different people represented in what you make, and the decision makers on your team. INCLUSION speaks to the quality of the experience you’ve designed for these diverse folks, so they experience themselves as leaders and decision makers. EQUITY lives in how we design our systems and processes; the way we work, and who we work with, so we are upholding our commitment to diversity and inclusion. FRAMEWORKS are the basic structures that enable complex systems to function. MISREPRESENTED COMMUNITIES are communities that have been defined by dominant culture, denied the ability to define themselves on their own terms, and are therefore falsely or narrowly represented. We use this instead of “underrepresented” or “marginalized,” because those identifiers again center the POV of dominant culture.

      I love these definitions and want to remember them