171 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
  2. Jul 2021
    1. Libraries in these scenarios are no longer custodians for the ages of anything, whether tangible or intangible, but rather poolers of funding to pay for fleeting access to knowledge elsewhere.

      A major archiving issue in the digital era is that libraries are no longer the long term storage repositories they have otherwise been for the past two thousand years.

      What effects will this have on the future? Particularly once the financial interests of the owning companies no longer exists?

    2. As Jorge Luis Borges pointed out, a library without an index becomes paradoxically less informative as it grows.

      Explore why this is so from an information theoretic perspective. Is it true?

    1. In 1780, two years after Linnaeus’s death, Vienna’s Court Library introduced a card catalog, the first of its kind. Describing all the books on the library’s shelves in one ordered system, it relied on a simple, flexible tool: paper slips. Around the same time that the library catalog appeared, says Krajewski, Europeans adopted banknotes as a universal medium of exchange. He believes this wasn’t a historical coincidence. Banknotes, like bibliographical slips of paper and the books they referred to, were material, representational, and mobile. Perhaps Linnaeus took the same mental leap from “free-floating banknotes” to “little paper slips” (or vice versa).

      I've read about the Vienna Court Library and their card catalogue. Perhaps worth reading Krajewski for more specifics to link these things together?

      Worth exploring the idea of paper money as a source of inspiration here too.

    1. Der Josephinische Katalog enthielt am Ende inklusive eines ausgefeilten Verweissystems ca. 300.000 Zettel. Dass er aber als erster Zettelkatalog Bibliotheksgeschichte schrieb, lag eher an einem Fehler im Programm. Eigentlich hätten nämlich nach van Swietens Vorstellungen am Ende des Vorgangs alle bibliographischen Angaben von den Zetteln in einen Bandkatalog übertragen werden sollen. Der Grund für diesen Programmierfehler bestand in ökonomischem Kalkül: Der geplante Katalog hätte gut und gerne 50 bis 60 Folio-Bände umfasst und wäre doch kurz nach Fertigstellung schon wieder veraltet gewesen. Darum wurden die Wiener Zettelkästen zur ersten relationalen Suchmaschine mit Erweiterungsfunktion.

      At the end of the Josephine catalog, including a sophisticated system of references, it contained around 300,000 pieces of paper. The fact that he was the first card catalog to write library history was more due to a bug in the program. Actually, according to [Gottfried Freiherr] van Swieten's ideas, at the end of the process all bibliographical information should have been transferred from the slips of paper to a volume catalog. The reason for this programming error was an economic calculation: the planned catalog would have easily comprised 50 to 60 folio volumes and would have been out of date shortly after completion. That is why the Vienna Zettelkästen became the first relational search engine with an expansion function.

      Description of the invention of the first library card catalog?

  3. Jun 2021
  4. booktraces-public.lib.virginia.edu booktraces-public.lib.virginia.edu
    1. Thousands of old library books bear fascinating traces of the past. Readers wrote in their books, and left pictures, letters, flowers, locks of hair, and other things between their pages. We need your help identifying them in the stacks of academic libraries. Together we can find out more about what books were and how they were used by their original owners, while also proving the value of maintaining rich print collections in our libraries.

      A cool looking website focused around curating an interesting collection of books.

      Mentioned by Nate Angell at I Annotate 2021.

    1. Ran across via https://openlibrary.org/developers/api

      OpenBook WordPress Plug-in by John Miedema OpenBook is useful for anyone who wants to add book covers and other book data on a WordPress website. OpenBook links to detailed book information in Open Library, the main data source, as well as other book sites. Users have complete control over the display through templates. OpenBook can link to library records by configuring an OpenURL resolver or through a WorldCat link. OpenBook inserts COinS so that other applications like Zotero can pick up the book data.

    1. Libib is a website & app that catalogs books, movies, music, and video games

      This looks like a pretty solid catalog system for the cloud.

  5. May 2021
  6. Apr 2021
    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Internet Archive</span> in (6) Why Trust A Corporation to Do a Library’s Job? - YouTube (<time class='dt-published'>04/28/2021 11:46:41</time>)</cite></small>

    1. Darius Kazemi randomly tweets out pages from books in the Internet Archive as a means of creating discovery and serendipity.

      Library Futures, Jennie Rose Halperin @Library_futures @little_wow

      Idea of artificial scarcity being imposed on digital objects is a damaging thing for society.

      Ideas to explore:

      Libraries as a free resource could be reframed as a human right within a community.

      Librarians as local community tummelers around information.

      Joanne McNeill

    1. This sounds tangential to the sort of idea that Greg McVerry and I have noodled around with in the past.

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Darius Kazemi</span> in Darius Kazemi: "In just a couple hours I'll be speaking with @jom…" - Friend Camp (<time class='dt-published'>04/28/2021 10:19:27</time>)</cite></small>

    1. I LOVE the hover effects for the book covers on this site which is also a great example of someone collecting highlights/annotations of the books they read and hosting them in public on their personal website.

      Melanie has written about the CSS part of the hover effect here: https://melanie-richards.com/blog/highlights-minisite/ and like all awesome things, she's got the site open at https://github.com/melanierichards/highlights. I may have to do some serious digging for figuring out how she's creating the .svg images for the covers though.

  7. Mar 2021
    1. The United States has no real answer to these challenges, and no wonder: We don’t have an internet based on our democratic values of openness, accountability, and respect for human rights. An online system controlled by a tiny number of secretive companies in Silicon Valley is not democratic but rather oligopolistic, even oligarchic.

      Again, a piece that nudges me to thing that a local-based IndieWeb provider/solution would be a good one. Either co-op based, journalism-based, or library-based.

    1. I want the patina of fingerprints, the quiet and comfortable background hum of a library.

      A great thing to want on a website! A tiny hint of phatic interaction amongst internet denizens.

    1. A news co-op is a news organization owned by its readers, whose membership fees pay for open access journalism – no paywall – usually organized as nonprofits (an IRS rule-change lets for-profit newspaper convert to nonprofits).

      I'm sort of wishing that we could also have social media co-ops. I suspect that there are a few on Mastodon that operate like this, but it would be interesting to see some focused around in-person communities as well.

      Why couldn't my local library run a town/city-based social media co-op?

      For this matter, why couldn't my local news co-op also run it's own social media platform?

    1. Amazon is making many books exclusive to their platform and not allowing libraries digital access.

      Maybe worth looking at what they're doing and how those practices mirror those of academic journal publishing for creating monopolies.

    1. But I believe the core philosophy of tiny modules is actually sound and easier to maintain than giant frameworks.
    2. he goes on to talk about third party problems and how you're never guaranteed something is written correctly or that even if it is you don't know if it's the most optimal solution
    3. "Functions Are Not Packages" - Well why not?
    4. Small modules are extremely versatile and easy to compose together in an app with any number of other modules that suit your needs.
    5. Write modules that are small. Iterate quickly.
  8. Feb 2021
    1. The bare bones operation without any Trailblazery is implemented in the trailblazer-operation gem and can be used without our stack.
    2. While Trailblazer offers you abstraction layers for all aspects of Ruby On Rails, it does not missionize you. Wherever you want, you may fall back to the "Rails Way" with fat models, monolithic controllers, global helpers, etc. This is not a bad thing, but allows you to step-wise introduce Trailblazer's encapsulation in your app without having to rewrite it.
    3. Only use what you like.
    4. you can pick which layers you want. Trailblazer doesn't impose technical implementations
    1. {a: 1, b: 2, c: 3, d: 4} => {a:, b:, **rest} # a == 1, b == 2, rest == {:c=>3, :d=>4}

      equivalent in javascript:

      {a, b, ...rest} = {a: 1, b: 2, c: 3, d: 4}
      

      Not a bad replacement for that! I still find javascript's syntax a little more easily readable and natural, but given that we can't use the same syntax (probably because it would be incompatible with existing syntax rules that we can't break for compatibility reasons, unfortunately), this is a pretty good compromise/solution that they've come up with.

    1. I can even imagine a distant future where governments might sponsor e.g. social networking as a social service. I know many people don’t trust their governments, but when it comes down to it they’re more likely to be working in people’s interests than a group of unelected tech barons responsible only to their shareholders at best, or themselves in the cases where they have dual class stock with unequal voting rights, or even their families for 100s of years.

      Someone suggesting government run social media. There are potential problems, but I'm definitely in for public libraries doing this sort of work/hosting/maintenance.

  9. Jan 2021
  10. Dec 2020
    1. Best Android Libraries

      We have written this article for app developers who are interested in the creation of Android Apps utilizing the latest of libraries and contributing their best towards the Android App Development Company .

  11. Nov 2020
    1. Is there any service that does this sort of alert when my library gets a book I want?

      Not quite the functionality you're looking for, but in the same sort of vein as WorldCat:

      Library Extension is a browser extension that works on Amazon, Goodreads (and possibly other book sites) that allows you to register your favorite local libraries, and when you look up books on those services, it automatically searches and shows you which are available at your local library. One click and you can usually download or reserve a copy quickly for pick up.

    1. Converting Angular components into Svelte is largely a mechanical process. For the most part, each Angular template feature has a direct corollary in Svelte. Some things are simpler and some are more complex but overall it's pretty easy to do.
    1. There's not much we can do there. It's not possible for a Svelte component to inspect another Svelte component and check if it exposes any prop
    2. I understand this is not ideal, but sadly this is not something we can change as it's how Svelte works.
  12. Oct 2020
    1. “The whole issue of this negotiation [between libraries and publishers] over the last decade derives from a place where libraries have almost no rights in the digital age,” says Alan Inouye, the senior director of public policy and government relations at the American Library Association. “In the longer run, there needs to be a change in the environment or in the game. That means legislation or regulation.”

      If libraries, as government arms, were to band together collectively, they'd have increased buying leverage. Perhaps this is what they should be attempting?

    1. Doing so also means adding empty import statements to guarantee correct order of evaluation of modules (in ES modules, evaluation order is determined statically by the order of import declarations, whereas in CommonJS – and environments that simulate CommonJS by shipping a module loader, i.e. Browserify and Webpack – evaluation order is determined at runtime by the order in which require statements are encountered).

      Here: dynamic loading (libraries/functions) meaning: at run time

    1. In a browser, deep-diff defines a global variable DeepDiff. If there is a conflict in the global namespace you can restore the conflicting definition and assign deep-diff to another variable like this: var deep = DeepDiff.noConflict();.
    1. Another example:

      const expensiveOperation = async (value) => {
        // return Promise.resolve(value)
          // console.log('value:', value)
          await sleep(1000)
          console.log('expensiveOperation: value:', value, 'finished')
          return value
      }
      
      var expensiveOperationDebounce = debounce(expensiveOperation, 100);
      
      // for (let num of [1, 2]) {
      //   expensiveOperationDebounce(num).then(value => {
      //     console.log(value)
      //   })
      // }
      (async () => { await sleep(0   ); console.log(await expensiveOperationDebounce(1)) })();
      (async () => { await sleep(200 ); console.log(await expensiveOperationDebounce(2)) })();
      (async () => { await sleep(1300); console.log(await expensiveOperationDebounce(3)) })();
      // setTimeout(async () => {
      //   console.log(await expensiveOperationDebounce(3))
      // }, 1300)
      

      Outputs: 1, 2, 3

      Why, if I change it to:

      (async () => { await sleep(0   ); console.log(await expensiveOperationDebounce(1)) })();
      (async () => { await sleep(200 ); console.log(await expensiveOperationDebounce(2)) })();
      (async () => { await sleep(1100); console.log(await expensiveOperationDebounce(3)) })();
      

      Does it only output 2, 3?

    1. We are beginning a renovation of our main library at Northeastern University, Snell Library, and have been talking with architects (some of them very well-known), and I’ve found the discussions utterly invigorating. I would like to find some way to blog or newsletter about the process we will go through over the next few years, and to think aloud about the (re)design and (future) function of the library. I’m not sure if that should occur in this space or elsewhere, although the thought of launching another outlet fills me with dread. Let me know if this topic would interest you, and if I should include it here.

      Definitely interesting. Please include it here or on your main site!!!

    1. First up for me is adding my reading notes to the site.

      Curious to see what this looks like and how it may morph over time.

    1. use Xstate which offers a finite state machine that adheres to the SCXML spec­i­fi­ca­tion and provides a lot of extra goodness, including vi­su­al­iza­tion tools, test helpers and much more
  13. Sep 2020
    1. It's fashionable to dislike CSS. There are lots of reasons why that's the case, but it boils down to this: CSS is unpredictable. If you've never had the experience of tweaking a style rule and accidentally breaking some layout that you thought was completely unrelated — usually when you're trying to ship — then you're either new at this or you're a much better programmer than the rest of us.
    1. In mapbox.js you'll see this line: const key = {};We can use anything as a key — we could do setContext('mapbox', ...) for example. The downside of using a string is that different component libraries might accidentally use the same one; using an object literal means the keys are guaranteed not to conflict in any circumstance (since an object only has referential equality to itself, i.e. {} !== {} whereas "x" === "x"), even when you have multiple different contexts operating across many component layers.
  14. Aug 2020
  15. Jul 2020
  16. May 2020
    1. localForage is a JavaScript library that improves the offline experience of your web app by using an asynchronous data store with a simple, localStorage-like API. It allows developers to store many types of data instead of just strings.
  17. Apr 2020
    1. SDG STORIES: 1 Stories Available

      The Luis Ángel Arango Public Library send, through us the story "Bibliotecas para la paz". Previously I asked about that. Is possible published this story?

    2. library types

      We would try to actualize the information about library types because the web of the government only have a record of state public llibraries and we have more public libraries in the schools and universities apart from private organisations' libraries.

  18. Mar 2020
    1. Methods must be tested both via a Lemon unit test and as a QED demo. The Lemon unit tests are for testing a method in detail whereas the QED demos are for demonstrating usage.
  19. Feb 2020
  20. Jan 2020
  21. Dec 2019
  22. Nov 2019
  23. Oct 2019
    1. "Element" SelectorsEach component has a data-reach-* attribute on the underlying DOM element that you can think of as the "element" for the component.
  24. Sep 2019
  25. Aug 2019