147 Matching Annotations
  1. Jan 2021
    1. This is a by-product of the success of Ubuntu. Whether people like it or not, most software available for Linux will target Ubuntu first. There may be packages available later for other distros / systems, but on the whole, you can be sure a software developer will target Ubuntu if they target Linux.
  2. Dec 2020
    1. As we advocate in our Agile Product Management overview, the more involved that a product manager is with the development team, the better. That involvement should be along the lines of a product owner who champions customer needs, the "why" of the product. When the involvement blurs into tasking, the "how" for a team, then there is a problem. Even with the best of intentions, this kind of utilization mindset tends to hide problems: defects, hand-offs, and unknowns. Interleaving scope and process tends toward locking scope, schedule, and quality. That's a recipe for failure.
      • The [[Product Manager answers the why]]
      • The [[Scrum Master answers the how]]
  3. Nov 2020
    1. A better definition I've been using since then, thanks to Jason Hwang, is "fixed output." A company that delivers the same thing to all customers is going to be organized differently than one that does things made-to-order.

      Fixed output companies

      A company that delivers the same thing to all customers. These companies are going to be organized differently than ones that do things bespoke for their customers.

    1. Yet from the responses to those posts, it’s become clear that for many people, maybe even most, this is not ‘obvious’ at all

      Worth taking a look at the so-called product centric-mindset, the mainstream approach in pretty much every technology startup: people are designing/building/launching/growing the product, in roles such as product manager, product designer, product engineer, product lead, product marketing specialist, etc. Funny paradoxical thing is that many of these businesses can be characterised to have a SaaS business model, as in Software-as-a-Service.

      When we take a closer look at the Service Design community, we will often hear that "Everything is a service" as these days every product is bundled into a service.

      I came across quite a few times about the Rolls Royce case study presenting the aero-engine business model: aircraft engine business model - Google Search

  4. Oct 2020
    1. Similarly, we use an opportunity algorithm to quantify which of the customer’s desired outcomes are unmet, and to what degree. A desired outcome statement is a uniquely defined need statement that describes how customers measure success when getting a job done. We assign a number to a desired outcome that indicates whether products or services used in a given market adequately or inadequately serve it.
    1. Yet many teams struggle to achieve a unified way of evaluating what they’ve delivered. Only 1 in 10 have a process for assessing the success or failure of newly-launched products and features.

      we've done this informally, but might consider a more formal approach

    2. For the product teams lacking a systematic way of logging these feature requests, pain points, and other bits of user feedback, a lot of valuable information ends up slipping through the cracks.

      we are working at getting better at this but there is room for improvement

    1. We created a strategy that focused on providing some of that in-store expertise as content online. We called it non-product content because it was aimed not at selling you something, but at helping you achieve a task

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    1. nice saas tool for generating pics for/from sns

    1. He says that he sees the combination of long form pieces and Q&A as a new level of support. “We used to have level one, which was sending a ticket to the help desk, and it was something we could easily resolve for you. Level two was a more complex problem that maybe required an engineer or specialist from a certain team to figure out. I look at this new system as a level zero.” Before sending us a ticket, folks can search Teams. If they find a question that solves the problem, great. If they need more details, they can follow links to in-depth articles or collections that bring together Q&A and article with the same tags.“
  5. Sep 2020
    1. This last characteristic may be the easiest to evaluate. Unless the position is very junior, I’ll usually hire product managers who’ve actually shipped a product. I mean from start to finish, concept to launch. Nothing is a better indication of someone’s ability to ship great products than having done it before. Past performance is an indication of future success
    2. I always insist that at a minimum, representatives from engineering, design, and marketing meet a potential PM candidate.
    3. I often joke that much of the time your job is to be the advocate for whoever isn’t currently in the room - the customer, engineering, sales, executives, marketing. That means you need to be capable of doing other people’s jobs, but smart enough to know not to. Great PMs know how to channel different points-of-view. They play devil’s advocate a lot. They tend to be unsatisfied with simple answers.
    4. So what do I look for in a PM? Most importantly, raw intellectual horsepower. I’ll take a wickedly smart, inexperienced PM over one of average intellect and years of experience any day. Product management is fundamentally about thinking on your feet, staying one step ahead of your competitors, and being able to project yourself into the minds of your colleagues and your customers.
    1. 2. Develop specific superpowers — don’t just rely on being a smart generalist.

      Bring something to the table. Could be solid design skills in my case (which I don't have yet)

    1. Whatever the future intentions of the PM, one thing remains for certain: this position is at the intersection from where founder strategy, user feedback, development team management, and market awareness come together. From what’s been said, it certainly appears that this is not a role that you “fall” into, but rather could aspire to be in.
    2. What’s more, to be a good PM, individuals also need to understand that it’s all about the bigger picture. Great managers “win” games, meaning that it’s not about getting a product out the door, but by ensuring that over the long-term, the team helps solve a larger problem. Nash says it’s not about getting an “E for effort” and brush off things that don’t work.
    3. The product manager isn’t the one that’s just sitting around overseeing the various teams and seeing whether it’s on track to meet the scheduled delivery or launch date. They are the ones who need to understand the market and that means knowing who the competitors are, what consumers want, and being able to help the marketing and sales teams better target them.
    1. More tactically,helping your team often means being the person who writes and summarizes notes after a long meeting, or writing a spec to make sure you have captured the team’s consensus and plan in written form.
      • Write notes after meeting and share with team.
    2. A lot of people describe a product manager as a CEO of the product or the “owner” of the spec, but I think that over-ascribes influence and authority to the product manager. The best teams operate in a way where the team collectively feels ownership over the spec and everyone has had input and been able to suggest and promote ideas. The best product managers coordinate the key decisions by getting input from all team members and are responsible to surface disagreements, occasionally break ties, and gather consensus (or at least ensure that everyone commits to a plan) when decisions get made.

      "CEO" of the product is an overrated term to describe PM.

      • Everybody on the team should feel heard/collective ownership
    3. Great product managers understand the very tricky balance between getting it right and getting it out the door.

      Balance between ship/get right = good product manager

    4. While shipping matters, the best product managers help the team make sure it’s the right product. Building something that doesn’t exist yet is always fun, but never a slam dunk.

      *

    5. More importantly, once shipped, the best product managers can measure whether the product shipped is the right one. They should work closely with the team to make sure the right moments in the product are measurable, and that the hard questions about whether people are really using the product can be answered.

      Once shipped good PM's know how to measure success fo the product

    6. Great product managers listen to user feedback all the time — whether it’s from usability tests, meeting users in the field, reading support emails or tweets, or working with the people in your company who do all of those things on a daily basis.

      *

  6. Aug 2020
    1. you could imagine my extreme disappointment after i came back after a year and a half to find that the entire exploration map was about 80% smaller, every different island was within clear view of your starting island completely decimating any sense of adventure or exploration you could have had.Almost all materials could be collected and all items built within four and a half hours. Islands are literally numbered one to five to display they're level of danger.not only that but you were practically spoon fed each advancement in the game, it feels like it was taken from a greatly ambitious open world, exploration survival game that would take months to finish and achieve everything in. To now being an arcade style iphone app game catered to ten year olds that would foolishly enter their parents card details in order to buy 10,000 roblox coins.
    1. I have over 689 hours into this game and would like to talk about the changes made to the Exploration. In my opinion the Exploration which made this game amazing now stinks!. You know longer need a ship to hit the islands. The exploration has pretty much been removed. One of the things that made this game so amazing was grinding to make your ship and heading out to Explore and find the other islands. Now all the islands are really close to the spawn point, there are not that many and well they stink. There is no reason or need to make a ship because you can easily reach all the island with a raft.
  7. Jul 2020
  8. Jun 2020
    1. News can no longer be (only) about the mass update. Stories need to be targeted to those who might be able to improve the situation. And journalism’s products — which are more than its stories — must be designed to facilitate this. News needs to be built to engage curiosity about the world and the problems in it — and their solutions. People need to get lost in the news like they now get lost in Wikipedia and Facebook. There must be comprehensive stories that get the interested but uninformed up to speed quickly. Search and navigation must be improved to the point where satisfaction of curiosity is so easy it becomes a reflex. Destination news sites need to be more extensively hyperlinked than almost anything else (and not just insincere internal links for SEO, but links that are actually useful for the user.) The news experience needs to become intensely personal. It must be easy for users to find and follow exactly their interests, no matter how arcane. Journalists need to get proficient at finding and engaging the audience for each story. And all of this has to work across all modes of delivery, so it’s always with us. Marketers understand this; it’s amazing to me that the news industry has been so slow to catch on to multi-modal engagement.

      everything would work perfectly if we had all of these and people are actually rational and diligent with infinite resource.

    1. you could say the same thing about a lot of new productivity apps as well - they’re trying to capture something intangible about the way we work, collaborate, share and organise. Now that we’re all locked down, half the software engineers on earth are sitting at their computers swearing at their tools and thinking of new ways to collaborate, with video, text, voice, screen sharing, or something else again, and with synchronous or asynchronous models, or something else. But the interesting ones here aren’t just ‘video’, or ‘screen sharing’ or ‘notes’ - they’re bets on how to present that differently, and to work differently. They’re bets on psychology and on how people might feel about working that way.
    1. For me the best part of Upcoming was being able to see what events my friends are going to. With their redesign, Upcoming decided to hide that behind two clicks. Now when you go to the site, I see whats popular in San Francisco, but I have to click to see what my friends are upto. Even on an events page, I can no longer easily see if any of my friends are going there. Instead I am shown the groups and tags. But I have to click to see who is attending.

      tiny changes to the UX. not understanding the JTBD of your product

    1. I kind of wish there was an HN like job site that was widely used in corporate America but didn’t have all the ‘content’. Just an online resume

      wondering what's the original purpose of adding the news feed to LI, the product decision.

      lack of understanding I think. to drive "engagements" and keep eyeballs? what's the incentives and how do they relate to LI's biz model?

    1. Theoretical Yields When reactants are not present in stoichiometric quantities, the limiting reactant determines the maximum amount of product that can be formed from the reactants. The amount of product calculated in this way is the theoretical yield, the amount obtained if the reaction occurred perfectly and the purification method were 100% efficient. In reality, less product is always obtained than is theoretically possible because of mechanical losses (such as spilling), separation procedures that are not 100% efficient, competing reactions that form undesired products, and reactions that simply do not run to completion, resulting in a mixture of products and reactants; this last possibility is a common occurrence. Therefore, the actual yield, the measured mass of products obtained from a reaction, is almost always less than the theoretical yield (often much less). The percent yield of a reaction is the ratio of the actual yield to the theoretical yield, multiplied by 100 to give a percentage: percent yield=actual yield (g)theoretical yield(g)×100%(3.7.29)
    1. Most people think you build the product then you market it. Thinking in loops means you build the marketing into the product. The product doesn't precede the marketing. The product is the marketing.

      By thinking in loops Harry Dry refers to a way of thinking about your acquisition strategy as being part of your product.

      This reminds me of Brian Balfour's idea of product-channel fit and how stresses that the product gets shaped by its acquisition channel.

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  9. May 2020
    1. We're closing the Support Forum issue tracker in favor of the Community Forum and support channels. We recognize that the Support Forum issue tracker has not received much attention in the last few months, and want to redirect our community members to locations that are regularly monitored by GitLab staff. As a result, this issue will be moved to the GitLab product issue tracker and triaged there.
    1. The folks at Netlify created Netlify CMS to fill a gap in the static site generation pipeline. There were some great proprietary headless CMS options, but no real contenders that were open source and extensible—that could turn into a community-built ecosystem like WordPress or Drupal. For that reason, Netlify CMS is made to be community-driven, and has never been locked to the Netlify platform (despite the name).

      Kind of an unfortunate name...

  10. Apr 2020
    1. 1Password wasn’t built in a vacuum. It was developed on top of open standards that anyone with the right skills can investigate, implement, and improve. Open tools are trusted, proven, and constantly getting better. Here’s how 1Password respects the principles behind the open tools on which it relies:

      I found it ironic that this proprietary software that I have avoided using because it is proprietary software is touting the importance of open tools.

    1. Automattic uses WordPress to power WordPress.com, and it contributes back code and time to the WordPress project. It is a symbiotic relationship. It isn’t accurate to say that WordPress is Automattic’s product, or that WordPress came from Automattic. Indeed, the opposite is true — Automattic came from WordPress, and Automattic (through WordPress.com) exists as part of the vast WordPress community and ecosystem.

      That's probably a common misconception. I'm glad they clarified that because I might have assumed that as well:

      It isn’t accurate to say that WordPress is Automattic’s product, or that WordPress came from Automattic. Indeed, the opposite is true — Automattic came from WordPress, and Automattic (through WordPress.com) exists as part of the vast WordPress community and ecosystem.

  11. Mar 2020
    1. Rojas-Lozano claimed that the second part of Google’s two-part CAPTCHA feature, which requires users to transcribe and type into a box a distorted image of words, letters or numbers before entering its site, is also used to transcribe words that a computer cannot read to assist with Google’s book digitization service. By not disclosing that, she argued, Google was getting free labor from its users.
  12. Feb 2020
    1. PoC Vs. Prototype Vs. Minimum Viable Product: What’s The Difference?

      Proof of Concept (PoC), Prototype, and MVP (Minimum Viable Product) are three very unique concepts in the app development that several new business persons seem to get confused around.

    1. To never block or remove features from k6 in order to make them exclusive to Load Impact’s SaaS productStrive not to delay introduction of new features in the k6 OSS tool, if the feature was planned to appear both there and in Load Impact’s SaaS productTo never introduce into the k6 OSS tool any artificial limits designed to promote conversion to Load Impact’s SaaS productTo work with the community, participating in and prioritize building the functionality the k6 community wants, making it the prefered tool for load testing
    2. With k6, our goal has always been to create the best load testing tool for the modern working developer and that we do this in collaboration with the k6 community. Our revenue will not come from k6 directly, but from premium value creating offers based on k6. These offers will be made available at https://loadimpact.com. Load Impact premium offers will have focus on providing further simplicity, productivity and ease to use functionality.
    3. We believe the key to Load Impact’s long-term success as a Company is to foster an active community of users around k6 as an open source project. To achieve this long-term goal, it is vital that we do not withhold new features from k6 based on whether or not they compete with our SaaS offering.
    4. Load Impact is a for profit organization, and recognizes that there is a need to balance this requirement with the needs of the k6 open source project. In the longer run, we strongly believe that those two needs will rarely be in conflict.
  13. Nov 2019
  14. Oct 2019
    1. But your customers are not the exclusive source of product feedback. Some of the most valuable suggestions for improvement can also appear during initial sales calls with prospects, internal evaluation of new features in your organization, and during design research and quality assurance motions.

      customer feedback and usage data is often presented as the gold standard for feedback re: product development - interesting to see other sources mentioned here

    1. “Say you’re trying to test whether people like pizza. If you serve them burnt pizza, you’re not getting feedback on whether they like pizza. You only know that they don’t like burnt pizza. Similarly, when you’re only relying on the MVP, the fastest and cheapest functional prototype, you risk not actually testing your product, but rather a poor or flawed version of it.”
  15. Sep 2019
  16. Aug 2019
    1. Now, I'd rather pay for a product that sticks around than have my personal data sold to use a free product that may not be around tomorrow. I value my privacy much more today. If you're not paying for the product... you are the product being sold.
  17. Mar 2019
    1. E-commerce has special requirements when it comes to showing products for sale online. A uniform look and feel to the products, showing the product rather than background, product alignment, image margins and special requirements per product category characterize e-commerce.

      We have top class designers who is expert on graphics design. We provide clipping path. background remove, image retouching service. We are also expert on eCommerce photo editing.

  18. Feb 2019
    1. }-lume who seeks to understand the operations of mind.

      In this sense, the mind is a machine, which operates in order to produce a certain product. What is this product? Knowledge? Can the product differ between people and instances?

  19. Jan 2019
    1. As an element of self-training, writing has, to use an expression that one finds in Plutarch, an ethopoietic function: it is an agent of the transformation of truth into ethos.

      This reminds me of Robert Yagelski's Writing as a Way of Being, where writing as the act, the experience, is what's valuable, not so much the product that results. The experience of writing allows a transformation of the writer.

  20. Dec 2018
    1. A small blog neighborhood hiding in plain sight.

      An even smaller neighborhood are the folks lurking in an annotation over your post, since they're disconnected from the comment roll below. Possibly an integration opportunity?

  21. Nov 2018
    1. The issue is that they are often not allowed to work as they need to.  Specifically, in so many companies, they are not truly empowered to work as they need to.
  22. Oct 2018
    1. The user's latent factors represent the preference of that user for the corresponding item's latent factors

      The higher the value of the dot product between the two, the higher the preference.

  23. Jun 2018
    1. Example1.40 (Product poset).Given posetsπP;∫andπQ;∫, we may define a posetstructure on the product setPQby settingπp;q∫  πp0;q0∫if and only ifpp0andqq0. We call this theproduct poset. This is a basic example of a more generalconstruction known as the product of categories
  24. Nov 2017
  25. Oct 2017
    1. product manager as a technical, user-focused team leader working closely with engineers and designers to guide products

      Short definition of what is a Product Manager

    1. Now, in the long run great product management usually makes the difference between winning and losing, but you have to prove it. Product management also combines elements of lots of other specialties - engineering, design, marketing, sales, business development. Product management is a weird discipline full of oddballs and rejects that never quite fit in anywhere else. For my part, I loved the technical challenges of engineering but despised the coding. I liked solving problems, but I hated having other people tell me what to do. I wanted to be a part of the strategic decisions, I wanted to own the product. Marketing appealed to my creativity, but I knew I’d dislike being too far away from the technology. Engineers respected me, but knew my heart was elsewhere and generally thought I was too “marketing-ish.” People like me naturally gravitate to product management.

      This describes me! This is me! This is why I am a Product Manager.

  26. Aug 2017
    1. Research debt is the accumulation of missing interpretive labor. It’s extremely natural for young ideas to go through a stage of debt, like early prototypes in engineering. The problem is that we often stop at that point. Young ideas aren’t ending points for us to put in a paper and abandon. When we let things stop there the debt piles up. It becomes harder to understand and build on each other’s work and the field fragments.
  27. Mar 2017
    1. Now that you have your component hierarchy, it's time to implement your app. The easiest way is to build a version that takes your data model and renders the UI but has no interactivity. It's best to decouple these processes because building a static version requires a lot of typing and no thinking, and adding interactivity requires a lot of thinking and not a lot of typing.
    2. You can build top-down or bottom-up. That is, you can either start with building the components higher up in the hierarchy (i.e. starting with FilterableProductTable) or with the ones lower in it (ProductRow). In simpler examples, it's usually easier to go top-down, and on larger projects, it's easier to go bottom-up and write tests as you build.
    3. To build a static version of your app that renders your data model, you'll want to build components that reuse other components and pass data using props. props are a way of passing data from parent to child. If you're familiar with the concept of state, don't use state at all to build this static version. State is reserved only for interactivity, that is, data that changes over time.
    4. Since you're often displaying a JSON data model to a user, you'll find that if your model was built correctly, your UI (and therefore your component structure) will map nicely. That's because UI and data models tend to adhere to the same information architecture, which means the work of separating your UI into components is often trivial. Just break it up into components that represent exactly one piece of your data model.
  28. Jan 2017
    1. Its results endure longer too
    2. Bob gained 20 pounds of new muscle, with no increase in body fat!
    3. By dramatic, I mean bodybuilders will double their rate of muscle growth in a little as six to eight weeks! And they can add 1 to 3 inches to their arms--an amazing amount of pure muscle to their legs and calves--even if they thought they had already "maxed" out.
    4. The Bulgarians have developed and perfected a much higher-level training approach that produces results I had a hard time believing were possible.
    5. dramatic improvements in their own results
    6. The approach you're probably using to train with could be improved by nearly 70%!
  29. Nov 2016
  30. Oct 2016
    1. Outside of the classroom, universities can use connected devices to monitor their students, staff, and resources and equipment at a reduced operating cost, which saves everyone money.
  31. Sep 2016
    1. it’s productive to not only think of schools and colleges as sites of learning, but also as marketplaces where goods, knowledge, and services are consumed and produced

      Agreed that it’s productive. But isn’t it also about framing (formal/institutional) education in purely economic terms? Useful to think about goods and services which have exchange value. May be a bit too easy to slip into the implicit idea that a learner is among the system’s key products.

    2. frame the purposes and value of education in purely economic terms

      Sign of the times? One part is about economics as the discipline of decision-making. Economists often claim that their work is about any risk/benefit analysis and isn’t purely about money. But the whole thing is still about “resources” or “exchange value”, in one way or another. So, it could be undue influence from this way of thinking. A second part is that, as this piece made clear at the onset, “education is big business”. In some ways, “education” is mostly a term for a sector or market. Schooling, Higher Education, Teaching, and Learning are all related. Corporate training may not belong to the same sector even though many of the aforementioned EdTech players bet big on this. So there’s a logic to focus on the money involved in “education”. Has little to do with learning experiences, but it’s an entrenched system.

      Finally, there’s something about efficiency, regardless of effectiveness. It’s somewhat related to economics, but it’s often at a much shallower level. The kind of “your tax dollars at work” thinking which is so common in the United States. “It’s the economy, silly!”

    1. often private companies whose technologies power the systems universities use for predictive analytics and adaptive courseware
    2. the use of data in scholarly research about student learning; the use of data in systems like the admissions process or predictive-analytics programs that colleges use to spot students who should be referred to an academic counselor; and the ways colleges should treat nontraditional transcript data, alternative credentials, and other forms of documentation about students’ activities, such as badges, that recognize them for nonacademic skills.

      Useful breakdown. Research, predictive models, and recognition are quite distinct from one another and the approaches to data that they imply are quite different. In a way, the “personalized learning” model at the core of the second topic is close to the Big Data attitude (collect all the things and sense will come through eventually) with corresponding ethical problems. Through projects vary greatly, research has a much more solid base in both ethics and epistemology than the kind of Big Data approach used by technocentric outlets. The part about recognition, though, opens the most interesting door. Microcredentials and badges are a part of a broader picture. The data shared in those cases need not be so comprehensive and learners have a lot of agency in the matter. In fact, when then-Ashoka Charles Tsai interviewed Mozilla executive director Mark Surman about badges, the message was quite clear: badges are a way to rethink education as a learner-driven “create your own path” adventure. The contrast between the three models reveals a lot. From the abstract world of research, to the top-down models of Minority Report-style predictive educating, all the way to a form of heutagogy. Lots to chew on.

  32. Jul 2016
    1. It starts by rejecting the canard that a university education is just another commodity.
    2. There are outputs, such as graduates, increased social mobility and higher standards of living.
    3. Don't turn students into consumers – the US proves it's a recipe for disaster