328 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Nothing represents you like your name. It’s been your brand since you were born. So when you’re online, you want your identity to match who you are in the real world.
  2. Nov 2020
    1. anonymous imageboard

      4chan is reasonably unique in the current online landscape, in that it permits conversation by totally anonymous users. This allows its users to post without much thought about their privacy status, which they often take for granted. This unique level of privacy fostered by anonymity, in a way, partially delivers on the Cyberspace rhetoric of the 1990s in that people can't be judged by their physical identities unless they offer identifying information up themselves. That's not to say that 4chan is a welcoming space for all (or even most) users, though, as it has been acknowledged, even later here in Ellis' article, that 4chan houses plenty of white supremacist tendencies, but, strictly speaking, as far as one's ideas go, they are judged purely based on their merit so long as no additional personal identifiers are offered. As Dillon Ludemann notes in his paper, /pol/emics: Ambiguity, scales, and digital discourse on 4chan, white supremacy, as well as other, "practiced and perceived deviancy is due to the default blanket of anonymity, and the general discourse of the website encourages users to remain unnamed. This is further enforced and embodied as named users, colloquially known as 'namefags,' are often vilified for their separation from the anonymous collective community" (Ludemann, 2018).

      Hypothetically, since all users start out as anonymous, one could also present their identity however they so please on the platform, and in theory what this means is that the technology behind the site promotes identity exploration (and thus cyberspace rhetoric), even though in practice, what most users experience is latent racism that depends on users' purposefully offered identifying information or generalized white supremacist posts that are broadcasted for all on the site to see.

      Work Cited:

      Ludemann, D. (2018). /pol/emics: Ambiguity, scales, and digital discourse on 4chan. Discourse, Context & Media, 24, 92-98. doi: 10.1016/j.dcm.2018.01.010

    1. Smart had to say that if sensation X is identical to brain process Y then if Y is between my ears and is straight or circular (absurdly to oversimplify) then the sensation X is between my ears and is straight or circular.

      If, X = my mind

      and, B= my brain

      and X == B

      then, if my mind X is in brain state B1 at t1 (i.e. acute pain) and your mind, Y is in brain state B2 at t1 (i.e. acute pain) then, B1 = X == Y = B2

      then, it follows that B1 == B2 at t1

      is it possible for two human being to have exact brain state at say t1?

  3. Oct 2020
    1. The new Isabel

      The "old" Isabel has been replaced by an entirely different being, rather than changing in character, much like how "the old donkeys and engines" were scrapped. This brings up an interesting question on identity - what makes a person, that person? It's a common theme in marriage that people do not resemble who they used to be when they married, but here the change in character is framed as a change in identity.

    1. Self-concept also differs from self-esteem: self-concept is a cognitive or descriptive component of one's self (e.g. "I am a fast runner"), while self-esteem is evaluative and opinionated (e.g. "I feel good about being a fast runner").
    2. Self-concept is distinguishable from self-awareness, which refers to the extent to which self-knowledge is defined, consistent, and currently applicable to one's attitudes and dispositions.
    1. Subgroups of the computer underground with different attitudes and motives use different terms to demarcate themselves from each other. These classifications are also used to exclude specific groups with whom they do not agree.
    1. According to the endurantist view, material objects are persisting three-dimensional individuals wholly present at every moment of their existence
    1. Could I also use Indie Web tools for a persona, or is that not in keeping with the community?

      The community is all about websites and identity, so having a website for a pen name is exactly the sort of thing you should definitely do! I'm sure there are a few who have done it, but I'm unaware of any documenting it yet. Starting a stub page on the wiki for pen name could be a good start if you do.

    1. In fact, these platforms have become inseparable from their data: we use “Facebook” to refer to both the application and the data that drives that application. The result is that nearly every Web app today tries to ask you for more and more data again and again, leading to dangling data on duplicate and inconsistent profiles we can no longer manage. And of course, this comes with significant privacy concerns.
    1. Lauren Michele Jackson is a contributing writer at The New Yorker and an assistant professor of English at Northwestern University.

      This is an excellent article on its own without the context, but it is more interesting with the context on the click-thru that Jackson's first book, the essay collection “White Negroes,” was published in 2019.

      I'm curious about the editorial decision to not mention it in the mini-bio here, particularly when the piece is so pointedly about identity and authenticity.

    1. I can't help but wonder what Jonah Goldberg's review of this book will be given his prior effort earlier this year?

      I'm also reminded here of Mark Granovetter's ideas that getting a job is more closely tied to who you know. One's job is often very closely tied to their identity, and even more so when the link that got them their job was through a friend or acquaintance.

    2. Wouldn’t it be important to distinguish people who ultimately don’t want differences to matter, like the people involved in #MeToo and Black Lives Matter, from people who ultimately do want them to matter, like ISIS militants, Brexit voters, or separatist nationalists? And what about people who are neither Mexican nor immigrants and who feel indignation at the treatment of Mexican immigrants? Black Americans risked their lives for civil rights, but so did white Americans. How would Socrates classify that behavior? Borrowed thymos?

      Some importatnt questions here. They give me some ideas...

    3. Fukuyama concedes that people need a sense of national identity, whether ethnic or creedal, but otherwise he remains an assimilationist and a universalist.

      Is it a "national" identity they need? Why not a cultural one, or a personal one? Why not all the identities? What about the broader idea of many publics? Recognition and identity touch on many of these publics for a variety of reasons.

    4. He wants to iron out differences, not protect them. He suggests measures like a mandatory national-service requirement and a more meaningful path to citizenship for immigrants.

      What if we look at the shrinking number of languages as a microcosm of identity. Are people forced to lose language? Do they not care? What are the other similarities and differences.

      Cross reference: https://boffosocko.com/2015/06/08/a-world-of-languages-and-how-many-speak-them-infographic/

    1. It's the part of your garden that you might actively show people when they come round to visit, that you're most proud of.

      It's a bit like cleaning up just for company, or in our current pandemic, just cleaning up the section of the house that's seen in the camera as in this New Yorker Cartoon:

    1. Clark based his book selection framework on a social justice curriculum, and it consists of four components: identity, respect, justice, and action, which build on each other. “When we were evaluating books, we would try to find books that fell into one of those four categories,” he said, noting that the majority of considered titles landed in the identity group “because we want young people to develop a sense of who they are and to see themselves.” According to Clark, “if young people have a strong sense of who they are, then respect enters in, meaning that they respect other people and they respect different perspectives and points of view. And when you have identity and respect, children are better able to identify instances of injustice, thereby wanting to see justice.” And lastly, “action,” the fourth element of the framework, Clark said, “gives young people suggestions or examples of things that they can do to take action when they see injustice.”
    1. But we don’t just want people to read our work. We want people to spread our work — to be so moved by what we wrote or said that they log on to Facebook and share it with their friends or head over to Reddit and try to tell the world. That’s how you get those dots to multiply. But people don’t share quiet voices. They share loud voices. They share work that moves them, that helps them express to their friends who they are and how they feel. Social platforms are about curating and expressing a public-facing identity. They’re about saying, “I’m a person who cares about this, likes that, and loathes this other thing.” They are about signaling the groups you belong to and, just as important, the groups you don’t belong to.
    1. Yet even before Clubhouse launches, it has encountered issues that larger social media companies struggle with. On Sunday, the entrepreneur Sriram Krishnan changed his name on the app to Tim Cook, Apple’s chief executive, as a prank. More than 100 people immediately joined the room.Hours later, someone impersonated Mr. Musk, the Tesla chief. That led MC Hammer, a Clubhouse user, to publicly call on the company to institute a real name policy. “Real identity !!! Be accountable for your words and opinions,” he tweeted.
    1. The prevalent practice of damaging images of the human form—and the anxiety surrounding the desecration—dates to the beginnings of Egyptian history. Intentionally damaged mummies from the prehistoric period, for example, speak to a “very basic cultural belief that damaging the image damages the person represented,” Bleiberg said. Likewise, how-to hieroglyphics provided instructions for warriors about to enter battle: Make a wax effigy of the enemy, then destroy it. Series of texts describe the anxiety of your own image becoming damaged, and pharaohs regularly issued decrees with terrible punishments for anyone who would dare threaten their likeness.
    2. “Imagery in public space is a reflection of who has the power to tell the story of what happened and what should be remembered,” Bleiberg said. “We are witnessing the empowerment of many groups of people with different opinions of what the proper narrative is.” Perhaps we can learn from the pharaohs; how we choose to rewrite our national stories might just take a few acts of iconoclasm.
    1. Social media has come to define an era in which we annotate texts every day, we easily share this commentary across contexts, and in doing so we iteratively define who we are.

      But are we also sometimes falsely defining ourselves because of context collapse within these structures?

      Isn't context collapse a root cause of a lot of the toxicity of our communications within platforms like Twitter and Facebook?

    1. Think of this essay as a series of strongly held hypotheses; without access to the types of data which i’m not even sure exists, it’s difficult to be definitive. As ever, my wise readers will add or push back as they always do.

      Push back, sure, but where? Where would we find this push back? The comments section only has a few tidbits. Perhaps the rest is on Twitter, Facebook, or some other social silo where the conversation is fraught-fully fragmented. Your own social capital is thus spread out and not easily compiled or compounded. As a result I wonder who may or may not have read this piece...

    2. Incidentally, teens and twenty-somethings, more so than the middle-aged and elderly, tend to juggle more identities. In middle and high school, kids have to maintain an identity among classmates at school, then another identity at home with family. Twenty-somethings craft one identity among coworkers during the day, then another among their friends outside of work. Often those spheres have differing status games, and there is some penalty to merging those identities. Anyone who has ever sent a text meant for their schoolmates to their parents, or emailed a boss or coworker something meant for their happy hour crew knows the treacherous nature of context collapse.
    1. In fact, I’d argue this blog has been largely a collection of writings concentrated on me working through the thoughts of my own digital identity and the tools that help shape it. The whole bit is highly meta.
    1. Facebook’s use of “ethnic affinity” as a proxy for race is a prime example. The platform’s interface does not offer users a way to self-identify according to race, but advertisers can nonetheless target people based on Facebook’s ascription of an “affinity” along racial lines. In other words. race is deployed as an externally assigned category for purposes of commercial exploitation and social control, not part of self-generated identity for reasons of personal expression. The ability to define one’s self and tell one’s own stories is central to being human and how one relates to others; platforms’ ascribing identity through data undermines both.
    2. Facebook’s use of “ethnic affinity” as a proxy for race is a prime example. The platform’s interface does not offer users a way to self-identify according to race, but advertisers can nonetheless target people based on Facebook’s ascription of an “affinity” along racial lines. In other words, race is deployed as an externally assigned category for purposes of commercial exploitation and social control, not part of self-generated identity for reasons of personal expression. The ability to define one’s self and tell one’s own stories is central to being human and how one relates to others; platforms’ ascribing identity through data undermines both.
    1. why encourage posting before you’ve even read the thing? Because, at least my hope is, it’ll prevent posting a link from becoming an endorsement for the content at the other end of that link. There’s a natural tendency to curate what we associate with our online profiles and I think that’s, in large part, because we’ve spent a lot of time equating a user’s profile page with a user’s identity and, consequently, their beliefs. But I consume a wealth of content that I don’t necessarily agree with, and that helps to inform me, to shape my opinions, as much as the content that I agree with wholeheartedly.
    1. In the past, I have written and talked about the need to create one canonical URL (address) for yourself online. The need to connect the dots to link together these disparate parts of your digital identity. I’ve been wondering over the last year or so whether that guidance was misguided.

      Ian, I am interested in your point about the 'canonical' link? Is your concern that it is a good ideal, but not realistic to expect of all people?

  4. Sep 2020
    1. By default, in order to allow inline fat-arrow validation functions, the field will not rerender if you change your validation function to an alternate function that has a different behavior. If you need your field to rerender with a new validation function, you will need to update another prop on the Field, such as key
    1. Slide 13:

      “No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it's not the same river and he's not the same man.”

      ― Heraclitus

      Of course it’s not the same river — the river, is, what? The water flowing past your feet? The sound that it makes? These things are different at every moment. Our idea of ‘the river’ doesn’t correspond to anything in the real world. Understanding this concept means getting closer to an understanding of reality itself — once you fully absorb the impact of this idea, it changes you, from a person who didn’t have that understanding into one who does.

      And as you bask in your newfound zen-like enlightenment, you discover an almost spiritually calming effect — the world as it is right now is the only thing that matters, not the state of the world as it was yesterday or as it will be tomorrow.


      Slide 39:

      “No man ever steps in the same river twice, for it's not the same river and he's not the same man.”

      ― Heraclitus

      And I think Heraclitus probably understood it all along. There’s a paradox contained in this statement. If the concept of identity over time is meaningless, then what do we mean by ‘it’ and ‘he’?

  5. Aug 2020
  6. Jul 2020
    1. For example, a parent or guardian could be asked to make a payment of€0,01 to the controller via a banktransaction, including a brief confirmation in the description line of the transaction that the bank account holderis a holder of parental responsibility over the user. Where appropriate, an alternative method of verificationshould be provided to prevent undue discriminatory treatment of persons that do nothave a bank account.
    2. The EDPBacknowledges that there may be cases where verification is challenging (for example wherechildren providing their own consent have not yet established an ‘identity footprint’, or where parentalresponsibility is not easily checked.
    3. If the user states that he/she is below the age of digital consent then the controller can accept thisstatement without further checks, but will need to go on to obtain parental authorisation and verifythat the person providingthat consent is a holder of parental responsibility.
    1. It is not unusual for one individual to possess several dozen different usernames and passwords.

      Having multiple names is an interesting manifestation of having multiple identities. Do you tend to use your "real" name, a consistent username across services, or different usernames based on the kind of service? What happens when those contexts collapse (like when you give a work acquaintance your personal email address).

    2. A digital identity is made up of the sum total of digital traces relating to an individual or a community

      I tend to think of my digital identities (plural) as something closer to personae - the personalities I wish to expose or highlight or preserve on particular platforms or with particular groups. Interesting challenge to think about the integrative, single identity.

    1. the indexable nature of human beings themselves via the traces they consciously or unconsciously leave on the network, that is to say the question of their digital identity.

      "Consciously or unconsciously" is interesting. The imposition of identity by others, as well as our own volition in crafting it.

  7. Jun 2020
    1. Furries are in the perilous position of having their interests form an integral part of their identity while simultaneously experiencing stigmatization from the world around them. For many, the fandom is their only source of social interaction and social support.

      For an activity, and a fandom, that is such a large part of the practitioner's identity (see Gerbasi et. al 2008 and associated responses), it's no surprise that the stigmatization that comes with being a furry is an isolating experience. I believe that this is a large a part of the reason why acceptance is such a large tenant of the furry fandom. Exclusion elsewhere leads to increased inclusion in other areas and groups.

      Non-judgementality should be the ultimate goal for health care workers in this position, but we have to recognize that it is a difficult, if not unrideable horse to handle.

    2. A small subset of furries, called “therians,” go beyond the interest in developing a fursona and believe they are spiritually connected to animals, are less than 100 per-cent human, are an animal trapped in a human body, or were an animal in a former life (Gerbasi et al., 2008).

      There's also the dissenting opinion that therians are a separate group from furries, an opinion perpetuated both by therians and "normal" furries, but it's generally the minority opinion, so for all intents and purposes, this is accurate.

    1. She states that furry participants might identify as less than 100% human for reasons that she felt included, “not the least having a hangover from furry drinks the night before.” While it may be an attempt at humor, we find this comment to be egregiously offensive, derogatory, and insulting to the furry fandom and our participants. Ironically, this remark illustrates her subscription to the very stereotypes we were empirically testing and con-firms the necessity of our research.

      This comment, framed as "egregiously offensive, derogatory, and insulting to the furry fandom and our participants", undermines the prevailing sense of identity in the furry fandom. I understand the transformative powers of alcohol, but in my uneducated opinion, it's a stretch that the furry identity for many people is activated by alcohol, and is not something that exists in all states of being (e.g.: sobriety).

    2. Her focus on gender identity disorder misses the main point of the study, which was that it was the first empirical study to collect data scientifically and report find-ings on the furry fandom, an often misrepresented subculture.

      One must admit that Flora Probyn-Rapsey's comparisons of gender identity disorder and the proposed "species identity disorder" were not without their merits, no? Heck, Gerbasi et. al were the ones to first make the comparison. It is true that it maybe took up too much of a focus in Probyn-Rapsey's criticism of the original paper. After all, the original paper only made use of the comparisons between the two disorders a few times to illustrate a larger point about disorder & confusion about furry identity, in themselves and in their place in the world at large.

    1. Here the diagnosis slips from requiring both being “less than 100% human” and “being 0% human” to only requiring the first criterion—being “less than 100% human.” The implications of this rhetorical slip are a vast shift in proportion, since it triples the number of furries who are potentially diagnosable as having species identity disorder (from 31 to 99 [or 46%] of the 214 furries who answered).

      I would argue that this is too loose of a definition. It does not simply refer to a physical body, which has pretty clear criteria for being considered 100% human. To be "less than 100% human" psychologically, while being a good basis for a disorder, does not adequately consider groups with a spiritual connection to animals, such as the Native American tradition of "spirit animals". This vague definition and exclusion of established cultural practices could prove harmful to the legitimacy of "species identity disorder".

    2. The data on personality disorders showed that furries were less likely to judge other furries as disordered, while the control group (the psychology students) judged other college students “significantly more often” along the lines of personality trait disorders. That the control group was made up of psychology students is perhaps an important factor here; this group may display an increased sensi-tivity to normative behaviors and “disorder.”

      When you ask a group of intermediate psychology students to judge whether furries are disordered, it's very likely that they will diagnose furries with personality trait disorder. They are psychology students, it seems pretty darn obvious that they would be more likely to diagnose psychological disorders, and there's the prevailing possibility of overdiagnosing, diagnosing a personality trait disorder where there may not be one. I am not in a position to say this is what is happening here, but considering the evidence, it's a reasonable possibility.

    3. Species identity disorder is modeled on gender identity disorder, itself a highly controversial diagnosis that has been criticized for pathol-ogizing homosexuality and transgendered people.

      This was also a major problem with the diagnosis "gender identity disorder", which was defined in the DSM (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) IV as "A strong and persistent cross-gender identification (not merely a desire for any perceived cultural advantages of being the other sex)."

      In the DSM V, the diagnostic name "gender identity disorder" was replaced with "gender dysphoria", and other important clarifications, including the need for a formal diagnosis of gender dysphoria to go ahead with gender transition surgery.

  8. May 2020
  9. Mar 2020
  10. Jan 2020
    1. ferreting-out of secrets is merely one purpose of surveillance; it also disciplines, inhibits, robbing interactions of spontaneity and turning them into self-conscious performances
  11. Dec 2019
    1. I’m convinced that white people also need to better understand white racial identity to engage anti-racism.

      What does "white racial identity" even mean? I am white, so I fit this category. I am also a woman, which means there are other biases I am faced with that my male colleagues do not experience.

      I grew up in a small town among a citizenry that was typically middle class, yet I was several rungs below most of them on the socio-economic ladder. How does my "whiteness" in that experience compare to that of my white peers? What about my experience in a small town vs those who grew up in urban environments?

      Identity is a very complex construct and involves so many facets that I find it too simplistic to lump it into "white" vs "people of color." The experience and identity of someone from India is different from that of one from Mexico or Nigeria, yet we can (and often do) call all of those "people of color."

      Are we asking the right questions?

  12. Nov 2019
    1. React guarantees that setState function identity is stable and won’t change on re-renders. This is why it’s safe to omit from the useEffect or useCallback dependency list.
  13. Sep 2019
  14. Jul 2019
    1. The components of identity assurance detailed in these guidelines are as follows: IAL refers to the identity proofing process. AAL refers to the authentication process. FAL refers to the strength of an assertion in a federated environment, used to communicate authentication and attribute information (if applicable) to a relying party (RP).

      Definition for identity assurance

  15. Jun 2019
    1. Simply put, a digital footprint is the record or trail left by the things you do online. Your social media activity, the info on your personal website, your browsing history, your online subscriptions, any photo galleries and videos you’ve uploaded — essentially, anything on the Internet with your name on it.
  16. May 2019
  17. www.saltboxbrewingcompany.ca www.saltboxbrewingcompany.ca
    1. Like the building of a historical Saltbox, brewing small batches of quality beer is a deeply rooted expression of the heritage and craftsmanship found in Nova Scotia.  
    1. first independent brewer to set forth on a quest to create the most desired beer this jewel of a region has ever seen. 
    1. phonetic signs, introduced to transcribe the name of individuals, marked the turning point when writing started emulating spoken language

      Interesting connection to identity and self-representation there.

  18. Apr 2019
    1. Instead of encouraging more “data-sharing”, the focus should be the cultivation of “data infrastructure”,¹⁴ maintained for the public good by institutions with clear responsibilities and lines of accountability.

    1. Collecting followers and likes authenticates and quantifies our existence without the need for deconstruction. We will not move any closer to the horizon of self if our sense of identity is based on validation through acknowledgement rather than engaging in dialogue and deconstruction.

      I'd love to explore this more. I think my reaction is that all "likes" are not equal (and therefore the search for them as goods in their own right is fruitless). But acknowledgement by other members (or potential members) of a genuine community is sustaining to dialogue. So the "right" likes and followers do help us make communal progress toward self, even as the "wrong" acknowledgements can frustrate it.

      (See next paragraph for a good caveat about identity work - or the lack thereof - in static homogenous groups.)

    2. As with justice and the law what becomes crucial within this conception of self and identity is the willingness to deconstruct or interpet. Damaging essentialization based on shoring-up (sure-ing up?) well worn binaries such as real/virtual, authentic/fake falls away as the ‘work’ of identity becomes interpretation, questioning and negotiation.

      Thinking of identity as contextual, interpretive, work-in-process, instead of as a static output, seems really positive and potentially integrative.

  19. Feb 2019
    1. Less than a third of the apps that collect identifiers take only the Advertising ID, as recommended by Google's best practices for developers.

      33% apps violate Google Advertising ID policy

  20. Jan 2019
    1. The machine-beings that emerge from these couplings thus demon-strate a different form of identity, on

      Since these machine-beings have some kind of identity, do these beings still feel the obligation to perform their constructed identities? Again brings me back to Goffman.

    2. hybrids
    3. require a different kind of response.

      Perhaps this is akin to asking "which one?" instead of "what is?"

    1. Indeed, much of this historyindicates that it is never simply a question of choosing, for instance, the openingof alterity over the crisis of identity

      Muckelbauer is suggesting that there will never be a concrete definition of rhetoric. The ideas of identity and alterity go hand in hand with each other and it can not simply be one or the other.

  21. Nov 2018
  22. Oct 2018
    1. how do we help students navigate privacy issues in learning spaces augmented with social/digital media. There was a specific request for examples to walk students through this. Here is what I do.

      I'm a little unnerved by the semi-legal nature of the "Interactive Project Release Form" but I think it's a great model (whether really legally enforceable or just a class constitution-type document).

  23. Sep 2018
    1. Snap asserting voter registration as a facet of that identity is significant

      Social media is a platform of self identity. We spend quite a bit of time "perfecting" the look of our social media pages and representing ourselves in a certain way. For Snapchat to use this idea to affect how we want to be seen is a smart move, especially because of how much we rely on social media for our public image and the increase in voting popularity and discussion.

    2. Maybe that's being a tad corny

      Nah, it's fine. Some people are still in the dark about what their political affiliation is. When putting it this way, it makes it more desirable to get people involved.

    1. It is amazing what calling someone by their name can do for a community and a feeling of belonging.

      I've been impressed in the past by faculty members who use this as a way to get to real class discussion and past serial dialogue between the professor an individual students in a Q&A. Saying "what she said" simply isn't acceptable; when you refer to another person's comment, you use their name,

    1. Another approach to confinement is to build rules into the mind of the created superhuman entity (for example, Asimovs Laws of Robotics). I think that any rules strict enough to be effective would also produce a device whose ability was clearly inferior to the unfettered versions (so human competition would favor the development of the more dangerous models).

      The author points out that human competition, which thus far has driven the exponential development/advancement of technology, would drive developers towards the "unfettered versions." While I agree that it would likely be the case, I think it's possible that the author is underestimating how much of ourselves would likely end up in the superhuman. Aspects of humanity that were likely never intended to be in the superhuman, but will end up there inherently due to who is programming it.

  24. Jul 2018
    1. as a force which connects us to the universe, and as a force which allows our body to make meaning from this connection. What we can understand from such a connection includes the distinction between our self and other selves, or our self and the rest of the world, but also, importantly, our relationship to the world, to other bodies in the world

      embodiment as Identity formation:

    1. “I support a social transition for a kid who is in distress and needs to live in a different way. And I do so because I am very focused on what the child needs at that time,” said Johanna Olson-Kennedy, medical director of the Center for Transyouth Health and Development at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, the largest transgender youth clinic in the United States with some 750 patients. A social transition to the other gender helps children learn, make friends, and participate in family activities. Some will decide later they are not transgender, but Olson-Kennedy says the potential harm in such cases may be overstated.

      This is one of the major problems in how so many approach this whole issue weather as a topic or in deciding a course of action for their own child. Furthermore the possibility of that happiness now rests on either on secrecy and passing or as is more often the case today it rests on the cooperation and orchestration of a comprehensive enough segment of the total people with whom your child is interacting to support this transition. What if we did that for gay kids. How much different would things be if tital 9 applied to all gender nonconforming kids even those who identified as gay? What if 12 states didn't have laws against speaking positively about gay as an identity in schools. What if parents where expected to do the work to insure that a self identified gay student was provided a social network for similarly identified adults and young people. And for just about any teen how might life be different emotionally speaking if we had been chemically castrated during our teen years. What if gay kids had the same wealth of support materials - public discourse etc. The reaason they don't is because we can not deal with their difference and we can not deal with it being about their sexual desire because we are unnerved by a the fact that children can identify and feel and act on sexual interests at a very young age. Gay kids know this and that is a big hurdle to comming out. I wished so much to have a boyfirend then I felt I could come out because it wouldn't mean telling my parents that I think about boys in a sexual way but I love this boy and won't deny him to anyone. No sad to say as was noted when oposition was initially raised amoung APA members over the introduction of GID to the DSM when they stated that it may just be that gay is a normal healthy worthy course of human development that as part of that process involves being in some way emotionally maimed by which they meant that there are certain painfull encounters with being different than ones own parents and most people in your community that gay people by dfinitioon must edure and untill society changes being gay is known to be a bad undesirable thing by children at a tremendously young age. So to be and develop as a person who is homosexual is not going to happen without certain paiuns and obsticles that others can easily avoid and mostly do.

    1. Privacy advocates tried to explain that persuasion was just the tip of the iceberg. Commercial databases were juicy targets for spies and identity thieves, to say nothing of blackmail for people whose data-trails revealed socially risky sexual practices, religious beliefs, or political views.
  25. Jun 2018
    1. In Visitor mode individuals do not leave any social trace online.

      Well, that's an unfortunate assertion in the age of GDPR and Cambridge Analytica. The difference between an intentional "social trace" and an "unintentional data tracking trace" is getting more important.

    1. But what makes the story in places like Toledo and the region around it hard for many politicians and even economists to understand is that the anxiety goes well beyond automation and the number of jobs. For many people, your job defines your life.
  26. May 2018
    1. Editors == Registered users Approver == Manager (approver approves (possibly creates) Editors. Also assigns roles to those individuals. Administrator == Boss person w/right to reject approved records

  27. Apr 2018
    1. music and art were important in helping those early modern humans forge a sense of group identity and mutual trust that enabled them to become so successful.

      Forging those group identities helped set up a strong base for creating different cultures.and also set up future pathways for ideas and theories among these groups.

    1. She had found a jewel down inside herself and she had wanted to walk where people could see her and gleam it around.

      Janie's self-reflection and searching beneath the veneer she had erected and maintained for so many years that has unearthed (recall she viewed herself as earth that absorbed urine and perfume with equal heedlessness) a precious commodity.

    1. Theweddingringhastobeputonthethirdfingerofthelefthand',shesaid,likeachildcautiouslyrepeatingitslesson,'forittobeofanyuseatall.

      I find it interesting how something so little like a ring, could symbolize a whole concept such as marriage. Even so that without it, one feels that they have no proof that they're married..like Orlando. This relates to a theme of identity/gender. For a woman to be classified as "married" she needs proof, and for a ring, a female accessory to symbolize so is an example of how "the clothes wear us, we don't wear them" saying--goes back to the question of whether gender determines identity or the other way around.

    1. broke from the historical script of those who pursue and succeed in science.

      This is a heartening story, but runs along the lines of another script, the nurturing woman. Perhaps this space is available to these young women because the dominant population have turned it down?

    1. Her words reveal the conflict between allegiance to hercultural background and her adopted culture.

      conflict between both of her cultures. her cultural background is one of patrice lumbaba who was killed. meaning her only identity were two european royaltyis and a horribly alteres portrayal, embodiment of Jesus

    2. FindingGod’s strength within was the emotional and spiritualfoundation and the necessary antecedent of “regaining mycomposure.”

      this is good and all but I dont think she found strength in God. it might've been the opposite. closer reading needed

      Sarah's relationship with God has been completely skewed. Her mother urged herfather to be "jesus" a savior to the black race. he was supposed to heal the misery of the black man, but instead he ended up wanting to escape his blackness.

      Her foundation of christ is just as broken as her foundation in her father. by her line "I always belived my father to be God" it means that she used to have faith in him. used to have faith in him as a black man like her mother did. but when he went off and married a white woman she lost her ability to have faith in anything.

      to her, her father marrying a white woman would be like jesus endorsing the anti-christ. it is absolutely blasphemous in chrisitan belief and would challenge the entire lifestyle and existance of a christians religious identity.

    3. n fact, some women preferred a Whitetherapist, feeling that would ensure that their private sufferingwould remain private in their closely-knit West Indiancommunity, and would provide an “outside” perspective

      This preferance for white women therapists in this exact respect can actually be harmdul. because a white woman is not truly what she needs to talk to. also sarah has been looking for solace in a white people, she doesn't need an outside perspective, what she needs is someone who actually understands her.

      this reaching for white people is what caused her confusion in the first place. Her desire for whiteness while being black- or rather her refusal to ackowledge the power/strength/beauty of her blackness is what kills her.

      At once she states that she bludgeoned her father with a black mask/head. this is a metaphor that she was so hurt that her father chose the white life that she'd rather have him die as a black beast than to see him live as black man married to a white woman. so she killed him in an ugly portrayal of blackness- to justify her desire to be affiliated with white people. She doesn't want to claim her father or ackowledge her hypocrisy.

      In fact, we can read her boyfriend as her therapist. he's white, jewish, and seems to find amusement in her lies, hatred, and body. this amusement of problems is because he's so far detached from the situation he can't provide any empathy and understanding to her actions and much less read into her obvious cries for help.

      read more into the need for black ppl to see black therapists*

  28. Mar 2018
    1. It is to explore thesocial processes that often depict Black women as liberated from tradi-tional white norms of femininity while such women continue to experi-ence poverty, violence, and illness at rates that exceed those of theirso-called fragile white sisters.

      Sarah clearly states how much she yearns to be like her white counterparts. that could be a peak of her wisdom on who has it easier in te first place.

      she already experiences the poverty, violence and (mental) illness that her blackness has had to offer her. and she doesn't want to be liberated from white feminity she wants to indulge in it. the same way that her father is indulging in the spoils of a white woman and a white lifestyle.

  29. Nov 2017
    1. institutional demands for enterprise services such as e-mail, student information systems, and the branded website become mission-critical

      In context, these other dimensions of “online presence” in Higher Education take a special meaning. Reminds me of WPcampus. One might have thought that it was about using WordPress to enhance learning. While there are some presentations on leveraging WP as a kind of “Learning Management System”, much of it is about Higher Education as a sector for webwork (-development, -design, etc.).