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  1. Last 7 days
    1. A Harvard Business Review survey found that 62 percent of high-earning individuals work over 50 hours a week, more than a third work over 60 hours a week, and one in 10 work over 80 hours a week. According to Markovits, elites today work an average of 12 more hours per week than middle-class workers (the equivalent of 1.5 additional workdays).

      This may be the case for high-earners, but where do these people sit with respect to the higher elite or "leisure class"?

      Are these hard working high-earners a new class of people that has emerged that aren't the previous elite of the mid-1900s?

      What effect does the rise of finacialization (versus manufacturing or service sectors) since the 1970's have on this shift? Did these high-earners arise out of a hole in the market to service the elites on the highest rung up to make their wealth grow faster?

      There seems to be a hole in this argument with respect to the prior quote:

      Fifty, 60, 70 years ago, you could tell how poor somebody was by how hard they worked. Today, that relationship has been completely reversed. Elites work for a living. They work harder than they used to. They work harder in terms of brute hours than the middle class on average, and they get most of their income by working.

    1. Rather than write new tooling we decided to take advantage of tooling we had in place for our unit tests. Our unit tests already used FactoryBot, a test data generation library, for building up test datasets for a variety of test scenarios. Plus, we had already built up a nice suite of helpers that we coud re-use. By using tools and libraries already a part of the backend technology’s ecosystem we were able to spend less time building additional tooling. We had less code to maintain because of this and more time to work on solving our customer’s pain points.
  2. Jun 2021
    1. These tests should be isolated as much as possible. For example, model methods that don’t do anything with the database shouldn’t need a DB record. Classes that don’t need database records should use stubs/doubles as much as possible.
    1. A common cause of a large number of created factories is factory cascades, which result when factories create and recreate associations.
    2. :js is particularly important to avoid. This must only be used if the feature test requires JavaScript reactivity in the browser. Using a headless browser is much slower than parsing the HTML response from the app.
    3. Use Factory Doctor to find cases where database persistence is not needed in a given test.
    1. Jed Kolko. (2021, June 4). Steady gains in high work-from-home (and better-paid) sectors, now just 1.6% below pre-pandemic employment. After initial slow rebound, now moving back to baseline. In low work-from-home sectors, jobs still way below pre-pandemic baseline. Https://t.co/6zC3RBfek9 [Tweet]. @JedKolko. https://twitter.com/JedKolko/status/1400797111067627520

    1. Butler then moves on toquote—not Cicero, as Wilson does—but Quintilian, who among classical authorities is the mostskeptical about the art of memory’s efficacy (see endnote 4). Echoing Quintilian’s complaint, Butlersays that it is probably more difficult to construct a memory palace than simply to remember thingsby rote (54–55).

      Construction is definitely work. The question about how much it may be should be addressed on a continuum of knowing or understanding particular concepts as well.

      Creating palaces for raw data de-novo, as in a memory championship, takes a lot of practice for speed and the lack of relationships. However in a learning setting, it may be better to read, grasp, and understand material and then create a palace to contain the simple raw facts which might then also bring back other bits of the knowledge and understanding.

      This might be a useful idea to explore further, gather some data, and experiment with.

  3. May 2021
    1. They have to ask you the dumb questions, either because their employer demands they do, or sometimes because their computer system doesn't let them get to the next part of the script unless they play ball.
    2. Another will employ smart people who apologise to you profusely for having to go through all the pointless steps, but that's just what they have to do!
    1. Being opportunistic can be useful, but having a big positive impact often requires doing something unusual and on developing strong skills, which can take 10+ years.

      Academics (and other knowledge workers) tend not to focus too much attention on getting better. Skills development happens in an ad hoc way rather than a structured and focused approach to improvement.

    2. career capital

      You must first generate this capital by becoming good at something rare and valuable. It is something that makes you hard to replace and is therefore the result of putting effort into developing skills that differentiate you from others.

      Newport, C. (2016). Deep Work: Rules for Focused Success in a Distracted World (1 edition). Grand Central Publishing.

    1. From an employers perspective, I believe there are many advantages:

      List of advantages for working 4 days per week (instead of 5)

    1. The research found that working 55 hours or more a week was associated with a 35% higher risk of stroke and a 17% higher risk of dying from heart disease, compared with a working week of 35 to 40 hours.
    1. Talk Abstract:Your job title says "software engineer", but you seem to spend most of your time in meetings. You'd like to have time to code, but nobody else is onboarding the junior engineers, updating the roadmap, talking to the users, noticing the things that got dropped, asking questions on design documents, and making sure that everyone's going roughly in the same direction. If you stop doing those things, the team won't be as successful. But now someone's suggesting that you might be happier in a less technical role. If this describes you, congratulations: you're the glue. If it's not, have you thought about who is filling this role on your team?Every senior person in an organisation should be aware of the less glamorous - and often less-promotable - work that needs to happen to make a team successful. Managed deliberately, glue work demonstrates and builds strong technical leadership skills. Left unconscious, it can be career limiting. It can push people into less technical roles and even out of the industry.Let's talk about how to allocate glue work deliberately, frame it usefully and make sure that everyone is choosing a career path they actually want to be on.

      ooh, great examples of the types of things that goes into glue wrok

    1. Prof. Christina Pagel. (2021, April 15). THREAD on VACCINATION & EQUITY in ENGLAND: I know I’ve tweeted about this before, but now we can look at how gaps by deprivation and ethnicity change with age groups and what that might mean... TLDR: widening gaps but access and communication will be key I suspect 1/5 [Tweet]. @chrischirp. https://twitter.com/chrischirp/status/1382725119773134848

    1. We’re a small team of four people, and we intend to keep it that way. We can focus on doing what we want to do: web and email development.
  4. Apr 2021
    1. This often means asking uncomfortable questions: who is doing the work of data science (and who is not)? Whose goals are prioritized in data science (and whose are not)? And who benefits from data science (and who is either overlooked or actively harmed)?

      I would also add "Who does the work?"

    1. Coinbase's CEO declared his company "apolitical." He says that he thinks of his company as a professional sports team. Paying no attention, it seems, to how actual professional sports teams have responded to social justice issues. He gave people a week to take severance if they disagree.
    1. Who's responsible for these changes? David and I are. Who made the changes? David and I did.

      Compounded with some of the above, this sounds like Jason Fried is saying 'We're fed up with what groups tell us. If you're against this, speak up as an individual.'

      I hope that Basecamp and Hey's HR departments are still open to listening to groups of people.

    2. when we need advice or counsel we'll ask individuals with direct relevant experience rather than a pre-defined group at large. Back to basics, back to individual responsibility, back to work.

      Is this not strange? Humans need other humans to work together well, to bounce ideas off each other.

      If the purpose of this is to reinstate 'individual responsibility', this sounds more like a way to backtrack blame rather than a possibility to dig out as much value as one can possibly excavate.

    3. DEI work

      What does this mean? Is 'DEI' an abbreviation, a product, or a way to use jargon to make people stop listening?

    4. People can take the conversations with willing co-workers to Signal, Whatsapp, or even a personal Basecamp account, but it can't happen where the work happens anymore.

      Do note that two of the three systems that Fried use for examples are private. In other words, only people who you explicitly want to see what you're writing will see just that.

      This goes against his previous actions somewhat, e.g. https://twitter.com/jasonfried/status/1168986962704982016

    1. (Yes, I realize from a technical, end-user perspective this really doesn't matter.)

      The word "technical" in this sentence doesn't seem to belong or to clarify anything. I think it would be clearer without it.

      But I think I understand what he's saying, which is that technical details don't matter to the end user. They only know/see/care if it works or not.

    1. Work-life balance However, I recently understood that while we were working on the game, I broke the one and only rule I set for the founders of the company: always family first. My wife was expecting our second child and I was working long days at the office, and I became obsessed with making sure the game is as good as possible. The same probably applies to everyone in the team, since we shared love and passion for the franchise.
    1. It can be a quick conversation on what’s working and not working. Having these conversations throughout the year will improve your performance and help you work more effectively with your team.

      How does this show up in the final output, do you quote them, like product testimonials. Anonymous? Should this be a thing we offer our colleagues, “I have some testimonials about working with you on this project”

    2. Metrics make your work impact real.

      We have to learn a fake language to talk to capital and it’s custodians to make our worth known.

    1. If you’re like me, you might be washing the dishes and still be debugging code in your head.

      Often wonder if subconcious work is ok if it doesn't cause any stress

    1. # +devise_for+ is meant to play nicely with other routes methods. For example, # by calling +devise_for+ inside a namespace, it automatically nests your devise # controllers: # # namespace :publisher do # devise_for :account # end
  5. Mar 2021
    1. easily exploited by a bullshitter. To counter this,organizations should only establish committees andhave meetings when there are clear terms ofreference, a value-adding agenda, and the rightattendees who can contribute to the desiredagenda. More simply, the need for a meeting shouldbe questioned unless an important decision needs tobe made.
    2. When bullshit is legitimized and codified, itspreads more easily and is likely to be moreinfluential. This in turn fosters the future produc-tion of more bullshit.
    3. Finally, any approach to evidence-based man-agement should ensure that the practices suit theindustry and functional context. For example,professionals in a biotechnology company would beexpected to follow and use industry-appropriateevidence-based practices that are likely to bemore rigorous and extensive than those adopted bya fashion-clothing company. Such practices includeencouraging or even requiring their employees todo the following four things (seePfeffer & Sutton,2006): (1) demand evidence for statements thatseem implausible; (2) examine the logic or cause-and-effect reasoning between the evidence andthe statement; (3) as needed, encourage experi-mentation to test the confidence of data and val-idity of statements; and (4) continually repeat andbuild on the first three activities to create anevidence-based learning culture that stifles theproduction and spread of bullshit.
    4. Furthermore, to help encourage and value evi-dence over opinion, managers should be carefulwhom they consult. While they should seek sub-stantive debate about statements and supportingevidence, they should only involve well-informedand value-adding experts. Social media andcrowdsourcing initiatives regularly remind us thatthe wisdom of the crowd is not as judicious as wethink.
    5. Colleagues throughout the organization, andespecially those in administrative and leadershiproles, should also practice it so that evidence canguide key decisions. This is also true in the areas ofmarketing and sales, which thrive on the creationand circulation of bullshit.

      Bill Hicks would have approved of this.

    6. Research byPennycook, Cheyne, Barr, Koehler,and Fugelsang (2015)suggests that an organiza-tion’s capacity to produce and accept workplacebullshit decreases with the prevalence of andvalue placed on critical thinking in that organiza-tion. They outline how individuals have differentsensitivities to bullshit: Those who have the abilityto stop and think analytically about the substanceof statements are less receptive to bullshit, whilethose with lower cognitive skills and less insightare more receptive.

      This is why workplaces must encourage and maintain critical thinking.

    7. The first three steps in the C.R.A.P. framework areused to understand the nature of workplace bullshitand how to identify and deal with it. Building on thisknowledge, the final step in the framework outlineshow to prevent the creation and spread of work-place bullshit in the first place. In the long term,this step may be of the greatest benefit in dealingwith workplace bullshit. Effective prevention willminimize the need for, and costs associated with,recognizing and acting against workplace bullshit.

      How to prevent workplace bullshit.

    1. When you seek advice, first write down everything you’ve tried.
    2. If you’re stuck for over an hour, seek help.

      Rule of thumb for when to seek help

    1. Now, if you also want deskopen to pass through any command-line parameters, you can instead use this slightly-modified version: #!/bin/sh desktop_file=$1 shift `grep '^Exec' "${desktop_file}" | sed 's/^Exec=//' | sed 's/%.//'` "$@" &
    1. A solution is almost indicated in the question: hinder xdg-open from choosing exo-open. A brute-force approach is to copy /usr/bin/xdg-open to /usr/local/bin (/usr/local/bin is earlier in PATH unless PATH has been modified) and to patch it to use open_generic instead of exo_open (unlike the XFCE4-specific exo-open, open_generic does honor xdg mime types)
    1. “As humans we resist change,” says Twitter and Square’s Dorsey. “It’s scary and something we can’t necessarily control. You hear that Twitter is important or Facebook is important or HTML5 is important, but how do you actually begin? There’s no easy way. It’s not fun to be self-reflective or self-aware. “In many cases it means we have to do more work,” he adds. “So we have to do more work.”
    1. On the “lows” side, I’d say the worst thing was the impact of not being present enough for my family. I was working a full-time job and doing faastRuby on nights and weekends. Here I want to give a big shout out to my wife. She supported me through this and didn’t cut my head off in the process.
    1. Before a bug can be fixed, it has to be understood and reproduced. For every issue, a maintainer gets, they have to decipher what was supposed to happen and then spend minutes or hours piecing together their reproduction. Usually, they can’t get it right, so they have to ask for clarification. This back-and-forth process takes lots of energy and wastes everyone’s time. Instead, it’s better to provide an example app from the beginning. At the end of the day, would you rather maintainers spend their time making example apps or fixing issues?
    1. Minimize the face sizes of attendees into grid view, and sit back a bit to allow yourself more personal space.

      I'm curious how much people already have adapted these things. What is MORE exhausting is the amount of micro-tasking that often has to be done throughout the meeting.

    1. By 2021, the total electric waste is estimated to reach 52.2 million metric tons, and the majority of the waste cannot be appropriately recycled

      With an increase of electronic equipment production, it is rapidly becoming the fastest growing waste stream in the world. If this electronic waste is not handled correctly it could result in many health problems. Most of this electronic waste cannot be recycled. This paper discusses the uses of pyrometallurgical, hydrometallurgical, and biohydrometallurgical means to separate metals from electronic waste.

  6. Feb 2021
    1. Ecoflex, unlike the materials used in commercially available flexible electronic displays, has a Young’s modulus that is compatible with the flexible bodies

      Mechanical Property tests were run for Ecoflex comparing it to polydimethylsiloxane and polycarbonate. Here it was observed that the great elasticity of Ecoflex made it better suited to be used on the robot based on the movement patterns of the robot.

    2. The translucency of Ecoflex also helped the machines blend in with their surroundings

      Previous test were run on Ecoflex and while it was not a translucent as substances such as polycarbonate it showed greater ability to stretch than other competitors which made it ideal for robot.

    3. Although there are technologies, such as electrowetting (25) and electrofluidics (26), that use microfluidics to tune color, they rely on electric fields to move fluid and are not immediately compatible with our compressed-air power source.

      Electrowetting is a method by which electric fields are used in order to manipulate liquids on the surface of an object. For example, water droplets on the surface of paper can be manipulated in order to create a reflective surface.

      Electrofluidics is technique that is a successor to electrowetting. Here liquid dispersion forces are used in order to pull colored oil from a reservoir and into an observable area greatly increasing the ability to see color.

    4. Semiconductor technology has expanded our ability to see into the IR (24), and we explored techniques for camouflage or display in the IR

      In 2003 Antoni Rogalski published his work on detectors that can see into the infrared spectrum (IR) here he highlighted three different IR detection mechanism and presented their specific benefits over conventional photon detectors. Here he highlighted resistive bolometers, pyroelectric detectors, and termopile as ways of detecting IR waves. Specifically these techniques make vast improvements in terms of thermal imagining which is used for detecting creatures using camouflage.

    5. initial approaches to change the color, contrast, pattern, apparent shape, luminescence, and infrared (IR) emission (that is, surface temperature) of soft machines fabricated from elastomers and flexible reinforcing sheets (6–8)

      In the past Robert Shephard has been a pathfinder in the field of soft robotics. He has published several articles that introduce the world to what soft robotics are and detail his work building soft robotic machine such as his soft quadrupedal robot. References 6 and 7 detail his previous work more extensively

    6. These animals typically change color using specialized cells, such as chromatophores or iridophores (4, 9, 10), not simple microchannels

      In the past scientist have conducted multiple studies as to how and why different organisms change colors. In nature, organisms rely on specialized cells in order to change color where the author it turning to less biomechanical techniques and using microchannels instead.

    7. Although specific demonstrations of camouflage vary among species, the strategies used have common themes: background matching, disruptive coloration, and disguise (3, 11, 12)

      Past studies have derived that different species may use camouflage for different reasons. However, the techniques that most organism use are widely the same. All organisms will use either background matching, disruptive coloration, or disguise. The author uses these principles for further development for soft robotics. For example, if a doctor was using a soft machine in a surgery and was having a difficult time differentiating the device from its environment. They could utilize the principle of disruptive coloration in order to differentiate the device from a background.

    1. oicing can alsoentail publicly calling ‘bullshit on bullshit’ orseeking help from an outside agency, such as aunion or government office. Employees are morelikely to choose to voice when they perceive thatthe organization offers sufficient psychologicalsafety; that is, when employees sense that theywill not be embarrassed or punished if they speakup (Frazier, Fainshmidt, Klinger, Pezeshkan, &Vracheva, 2017). The propensity to voice also de-pends on the extent to which employees haveorganizational commitment; that is, whether theycare for and believe in the organization enough towant to counter the harm of bullshit, combinedwith their perceived ability and capacity to make adifference. Such conditions are necessary foreffectively confronting bullshit. A principle knownas Brandolini’s Law states that the amount of en-ergy needed to refute bullshit is an order ofmagnitude larger than is needed to produce it(“Brandolini’s Law,” 2014).
    2. Voicing is the act of employees speaking up toconfront what they consider to be bullshit. Em-ployees may ask to see evidence that supports thesuspected bullshit. They may themselves providebullshit-challenging evidence along with alterna-tive statements, and when doing so should becognizant that simple and coherent bullshit willtend to be more appealing than intricate andcomplex truths. Employees may also voice bylaughing at and mocking bullshit. This is a way to“informally show up its emptiness without havingto risk a full-frontal face-off with powerful bullshitartists” (Spicer, 2017, p. 167).
    3. When employees correctly conclude that a state-ment is bullshit, they may react in a number ofdifferent ways. To illustrate these reactions, wedraw onHirschman’s (1970)exit,voice,loyaltyframework, which he initially formulated to illus-trate how employees react to organizations indecline or when the sky was falling. Scholars lateraddedneglect(Farrell, 1983; Withey & Cooper,1989) and successfully applied the framework tohelp understand employees’ responses to negativeworkplace experiences (Rusbult, Farrell, Rogers, &Mainous, 1988; Turnley & Feldman, 1999). Weapply this framework here to employees’ reactionsto bullshit.When employees act by exiting, they are tryingto escape from the bullshit and the bullshitter.This can involve quitting the organization orseeking a transfer to a different unit of the orga-nization so as to avoid the influence of the bull-shitter. Exiting is a likely reaction when employeesare so appalled by the bullshit that they cannotstay with the organization or unit, or when theyare already disillusioned, and the bullshit (possiblythe latest bout in a stream of bullshit) is the laststraw. For exiting to happen, employee dissatis-faction with the situation must rise to such a levelthat the disadvantages of remaining and facingbullshit in the workplace are greater than thedisadvantages of leaving. Or alternatively, thepersonal costs of leaving should be low enoughrelative to the costs of the two other responses inwhich workers remain and either contest thebullshit (i.e., voice) or disengage from the work-place bullshit (i.e., neglect).
    4. Remember that bullshitters, unre-stricted by truth, have more freedom to frametheir statements. They are at liberty to deviseappealing bullshit with three significant charac-teristics. First, the bullshit may offer personalbenefits to the audience. For example, if a scien-tist in a research and development (R&D) depart-ment hears some bullshit from their boss thatsuggests the company is about to double the R&Dbudget, the scientist is likely to find this bullshitappealing. In addition, some employees may alsorelish or need workplace bullshit so as to flourish intheir jobs. They view bullshit as a necessary aspectof organizational life. Trendy jargon, flaky logic,and shallow arguments can be so appealing tosome that they provide them with direction andenergy.
    5. Furthermore, abullshitter’s statements may never have beenintended to be believed or even to garner muchattention. They are intended to misrepresent bybeing appealing or convincing, or by distracting,exhausting, or disengaging colleagues, so thatagendas can be pursued with little or no resis-tance. This lack of awareness of the true nature ofworkplace bullshit is one of the reasons why thereis such an abundance of it (Fredal, 2011).
    6. The bullshitter makes adecision to further that agenda through commu-nicative acts and decides on a message and amedium that will help them to achieve thatagenda. Crucially, while doing so, they disregardthe truth, in the sense that they are not concernedwith the truth, inaccuracy, or falseness of theirmessage but only in its efficaciousness in promot-ing the desired agenda
    7. when we engagein work, we must distinguish between this type ofsocial bullshit, which can be harmless or evenhelpful to the organization (because it can enablethe development of normal interpersonal re-lationships), and other types of bullshit that canhave damaging impacts on the organization.

      This points out the difference between personal bullshit and work bullshit; the later may help at times, but largely, corporate bullshit is anti-intellectual and damages the workplace.

    8. AbstractMany organizations are drowning in a flood of corporate bullshit, andthis is particularly true of organizations in trouble, whose managers tend to makeup stuff on the fly and with little regard for future consequences. Bullshittingand lying are not synonymous. While the liar knows the truth and wittingly bendsit to suit their purpose, the bullshitter simply does not care about the truth. Man-agers can actually do something about organizational bullshit, and this ExecutiveDigest provides a sequential framework that enables them to do so. They cancomprehend it, they can recognize it for what it is, they can act against it, and theycan take steps to prevent it from happening in the future. While it is unlikely thatany organization will ever be able to rid itself of bullshit entirely, this article arguesthat by taking these steps, astute managers can work toward stemming its flood
    1. If you ask my former students, they will tell you that as a teacher, my goal is to do nothing. I dream of the day when I can sit at my desk, feet propped up, reading a book, while the classroom bursts with activity and learning around me.
    1. The LGPL allows users to use and integrate LGPL software components into their own software without being required to release the source code of their own software components. However, if users modify LGPL software components (“derivative work”), they are required to make the modified software component available under the same LGPL license. To avoid the latter with TRB, users have to comply with para. 5 LGPLv2.1: A program that contains no derivative of any portion of the Library, but is designed to work with the Library by being compiled or linked with it, is called a “work that uses the Library”. Such a work, in isolation, is not a derivative work of the Library, and therefore falls outside the scope of this License. In other words: if you use the TRB libraries in your commercial applications or Open-Source projects, you’re not creating a derivative work of Trailblazer. Your software can be distributed under any terms.
    2. Trailblazer (TRB) is an Open-Source project. Since we want to keep it that way, we decided to raise awareness for the “cost” of our work - providing new versions and features is incredibly time-consuming for us, but we love what we do.
    1. This didn't work for me. Answering "y" somehow causes the script to finish immediately, rather than letting children continue sleeping. (Same thing if I make the signal handler function an empty no-op.) Does anyone know why it doesn't work for me or how to get it to work? It's as if the interrupt gets propagated to the child processes too so that it's no longer waiting for them.
    1. We can ask timeout to try to stop the program using SIGTERM, and to only send in SIGKILL if SIGTERM didn’t work. To do this, we use the -k (kill after) option. The -k option requires a time value as a parameter.
    1. Kit Yates. (2021, January 22). Is this lockdown 3.0 as tough as lockdown 1? Here are a few pieces of data from the @IndependentSage briefing which suggest that despite tackling a much more transmissible virus, lockdown is less strict, which might explain why we are only just keeping on top of cases. [Tweet]. @Kit_Yates_Maths. https://twitter.com/Kit_Yates_Maths/status/1352662085356937216

    1. Establish structured daily check-ins: Many successful remote managers establish a daily call with their remote employees.

      make sure there is space during standup for chit-chat.

    1. As schematically illustrated in Fig. 1D, the cross-linked polyimine functions are based on the dynamic covalent chemistry principle

      The dynamic covalent chemistry principle states that when a system is under constant entropy then the system will start to approach a minimum value of internal energy. In this case, polyimine is constantly having its covalent bonds broken, which is the constant entropy, and this makes the internal energy of the polyimine lower. With this lower energy, it is easier to break and reattach the covalent bonds within the polyimine, meaning that self-healing is easier.

    2. Among all the exciting applications, wearable electronics represents one of the most important, as it is the most accessible to people, and can be integrated onto the surface of human body to provide many useful functions, including physical activity tracking

      Dr. Xu and associates have developed a soft microfluidic sensor that could accommodate the human skin. The result was a soft sensor that could sit on the surface of the skin and monitor physiological markers wirelessly.

    3. It can be applied in places that are not accessible by traditional rigid printed circuit boards

      Dr. Choi and associates developed a nanocomposite made of silver and gold that optimizes conductivity and stretchability. This nanocomposite was used to make implantable implants that could integrate into the human skin.

    4. Stretchable/flexible electronics has attracted tremendous attention in the past two to three decades due to the combination of its superior mechanical attributes and electrical performance

      Dr. Gao and associates have developed a flexible wearable sensor that provides real time signals for certain biomarkers. Gao's devices analyzes sweat to determine real time data for glucose, lactose, electrolytes, and also the temperature of the skin.

  7. scientificinquiryinsocialwork.pressbooks.com scientificinquiryinsocialwork.pressbooks.com
    1. Action research also distinguishes itself from other research in that its purpose is to create change on an individual and community level. Kristin Esterberg puts it quite eloquently when she says, “At heart, all action researchers are concerned that research not simply contribute to knowledge but also lead to positive changes in people’s lives” (2002, p. 137).

      Directional goal

    1. And honestly, most people prefer the no hassle, especially after wasting too much time dabbling with distros that are "for advanced users" troubleshooting all kinds of dumbass problems that just worked out of the box in many other distros.
    1. I chose 18.04 because it's the latest LTS version, and I'm not keen on updating my OS every year or so. (I like getting things stable and not having to worry for a while)
  8. Jan 2021
    1. Its not too complicated but it is an annoyance. I want /etc/hosts, /etc/resolv.conf, /etc/nsswitch.conf, /etc/rc.local and all the standard stuff to work. The heavy lifting is done in the kernel. All they need to do is leave it alone. Its getting harder to make Ubuntu behave like Linux.
    1. We also have an “anti-overtime” rate: past twenty hours a week, people can continue to work at an hourly rate of 50 percent. This allows us to have a high hourly rate for the highest leverage work and also allows people to work more per week if they wish.

      anti-overtime... love it.

    1. Most users frankly don’t care how software is packaged. They don’t understand the difference between deb / rpm / flatpak / snap. They just want a button that installs Spotify so they can listen to their music.
    2. Frankly, if the Ubuntu Desktop team “switch” from making a deb of Chromium to making a snap, I doubt they’d switch back. It’s a tremendous amount of work for developer(s) to maintain numerous debs across all supported releases. Maintaining a single snap is just practically and financially more sensible.
    3. This example of the chromium really shows that unless snaps or other similar format was used, applications would have to be sometime very heavily patched to work on older versions of systems to the point that it generates so much work that it would not be worth do to it otherwise, or at least not worth when the snap option exists and doesn’t require that much more work.
    4. What’s the use of ie. snap libreoffice if it can’t access documents on a samba server in my workplace ? Should I really re-organize years of storage and work in my office for being able to use snap ? A too high price to pay, for the moment.
    5. I - we all - totally agree about the benefits of snap for developers. But the loss of comfort and flexibility for end user is eventually a no-go option.
    6. Users want work be done. Not struggling about how allowing access to removable medias or such a file on another partition… Not breaking their habits or workflows each time a snap replaces a deb.
  9. Dec 2020
    1. People really don't stress enough the importance of enjoying what you're programming. It aids creativity, makes you a better teammate, and makes it significantly easier to enter a state of flow. It should be considered an important factor in choosing a web development framework (or lack thereof). Kudos!
    1. Making UIs with Svelte is a pleasure. Svelte’s aesthetics feel like a warm cozy blanket on the stormy web. This impacts everything — features, documentation, syntax, semantics, performance, framework internals, npm install size, the welcoming and helpful community attitude, and its collegial open development and RFCs — it all oozes good taste. Its API is tight, powerful, and good looking — I’d point to actions and stores to support this praise, but really, the whole is what feels so good. The aesthetics of underlying technologies have a way of leaking into the end user experience.