55 Matching Annotations
  1. Feb 2019
    1. Skill Gaming – Mind Sharpening or Time Wasting?

      Trend watchers suggest that its growth is four times the speed of growth in internet use itself. If this trend continues unabated they'll be more people playing skill games.

    1. Useful Tips to Winning on Skill Machines

      Many people believe that winning money on skill machines is based solely on chance and while a huge percentage of winning from these machines does rely on chance, you can actually try and win small amounts of money from different skill machines at certain casinos with the help of certain basic tips to winning on skill machines.

  2. Jan 2019
    1. No technique, no professional skill can be acquired without exercise; nor can the art of living, the technê tou biou, be learned without askesis that should be understood as a training of the self by oneself.

      Like any other skill, living "well," which differs depending on the person, requires lived experience. It involves navigating life through achievements and failures through which skills are acquired.

  3. Dec 2018
    1. Girls, even when their abilities in science equaled or excelled that of boys, often were likely to be better overall in reading comprehension

      What does this say about different skill sets? Is this biological or genetic, or is it just conditioned?

  4. Feb 2018
    1. decoding word

      Being able to decode words are a skill a students must understand how to do in order to improve their reading.

    2. Compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event or topic; describe the differences in focus and the information provided

      The students must have the skill to compare and contrast. The knowledge comes in when the student has to know the information that is needed to compare and contrast.

    3. ask and answer questions about key details in a text

      the knowledge comes from being able to understand key details in a text while the skill comes from being able to ask questions and answer questions using the knowledge they have.

  5. Sep 2017
    1. cribe how

      This is an important skill becuase students need to be able to recognize point of view in texts.

    2. scribe how words and phrases (e.g., regular beats, alliteration, rhymes, repeated lines) supply rhythm and meaning in a s

      This is important and is another skill becuase grade school students need to be able to recognize rhytm and meaning.

    3. Ask and answer questions about unknown

      This is another skill that I feel as if is so important for all children to be able to do. I think that asking questions in life iss so important inside and outside of the classroom. I feel this way becuase I feel as if if you dont ask questions you dont learn. Therefore asking questions about unknown words in text is so important because it will help you expand your vocabulary and higher your reading level.

    4. With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story.

      I feel as if this is really important for all children to be able to do even starting at a young age like kindergarten. This skill is somehting all children should be able to do and complete becuase identifying characters, settings, and major events in a story is the first step in completing more complex comprehension questions that will be needed to complete in blooms taxonomy.

  6. Feb 2017
    1. Use linking words and phrases (e.g., also, another, and, more, but) to connect ideas within categories of information

      Using linking words makes a students writing much more fluid. An idea that comes to mind when thinking about fun ways to teach linking words is to play a game with the entire class. As the teacher, come up with the beginning sentence of a story. Then, have students popcorn continuing it on by using the linking words and phrases. This way they can have a fun creative way to learn something that may otherwise seem boring.

    2. ecoding words.

      Decoding words is an essential skill. When a student has difficulties with decoding, they have issues with accuracy and comprehension in reading. These problems can relay over into math when it comes to word problems too.

    3. Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases

      This is important because it allows for them to use their current knowledge of vocabulary and context clues to determine the meanings of new words.

    4. 13 | K-5 | rEAdiNg: iNFOrmATiONALTExTRICommon Core State StandardS for enGLISH LanGUaGeartS & LIteraCy In HIStory/SoCIaL StUdIeS, SCIenCe, and teCHnICaL SUbjeCtSRIReading Standards for Informational Text K–5Kindergartners:Grade 1 students:Grade 2 students:Key Ideas and details1.With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.1.Ask and answer questions about key details in a te

      I really like that this is left really simple. It's a skill that students need to know how to do in order to grasp the purpose of the text. In the 1st grade, the text will more likely be stories but if they aren't able to ask questions then it creates more challenges when it comes to how they learn

  7. Nov 2016
    1. My thoughts on Climatic Associations of British Species Distributions Show Good Transferability in Time but Low Predictive Accuracy for Range Change by Rapacciuolo et al. (2012).

    2. Whilst the consensus method we used provided the best predictions under AUC assessment – seemingly confirming its potential for reducing model-based uncertainty in SDM predictions [58], [59] – its accuracy to predict changes in occupancy was lower than most single models. As a result, we advocate great care when selecting the ensemble of models from which to derive consensus predictions; as previously discussed by Araújo et al. [21], models should be chosen based on aspects of their individual performance pertinent to the research question being addressed, and not on the assumption that more models are better.

      It's interesting that the ensembles perform best overall but more poorly for predicting changes in occupancy. It seems possible that ensembling multiple methods is basically resulting in a more static prediction, i.e., something closer to a naive baseline.

    3. an average 87% of grid squares maintaining the same occupancy status; similarly, all climatic variables were also highly correlated between time periods (ρ>0.85, p<0.001 for all variables). As a result, models providing a good fit to early distribution records can be expected to return a reasonable fit to more recent records (and vice versa), regardless of whether relevant predictors of range shift have actually been captured. Previous studies have warned against taking strong model performance on calibration data to indicate high predictive accuracy to a different time period [20], [24]–[26]; our results indicate that strong model performance in a different time period, as measured by widespread metrics, may not indicate high predictive accuracy either.

      This highlights the importance of comparing forecasts to baseline predictions to determine the skill of the forecast vs. the basic stability of the pattern.

    4. The correct classification rate of grid squares that remained occupied or remained unoccupied (CCRstable) was fairly high (mean±s.d.  = 0.75±0.15), and did not covary with species’ observed proportional change in range size (Figure 3B). In contrast, the CCR of grid squares whose occupancy status changed between time periods (CCRchanged) was very low overall (0.51±0.14; guessing randomly would be expected to produce a mean of 0.5), with range expansions being slightly better predicted than range contractions (0.55±0.15 and 0.48±0.12, respectively; Figure 3C).

      This is a really important result and my favorite figure in this ms. For cells that changed occupancy status (e.g., a cell that has occupied at t_1 and was unoccupied at t_2) most models had about a 50% chance of getting the change right (i.e., a coin flip).

    5. Quantifying the temporal transferability of SDMs by comparing the agreement between model predictions and observations for the predicted period using common metrics is not a sufficient test of whether models have actually captured relevant predictors of change. A single range-wide measure of prediction accuracy conflates accurately predicting species expansions and contractions to new areas with accurately predicting large parts of the distribution that have remained unchanged in time. Thus, to assess how well SDMs capture drivers of change in species distributions, we measured the agreement between observations and model predictions of each species’ (a) geographic range size in period t2, (b) overall change in geographic range size between time periods, and (c) grid square-level changes in occupancy status between time periods.

      This is arguably the single most important point in this paper. It is equivalent to comparing forecasts to simple baseline forecasts as is typically done in weather forecasting. In weather forecasting it is typical to talk about the "skill" of the forecast, which is how much better it does than a simple baseline. In this case the the baseline is a species range that doesn't move at all. This would be equivalent to a "naive" forecast in traditional time-series analysis since we only have a single previous point in time and the baseline is simply the prediction based on this value not changing.

    1. skills

      Skills are one piece of this puzzle that can't be ignored, but also can't be the end.

    2. Digital skills would focus on which tool to use (e.g., Twitter) and how to use it (e.g., how to tweet, retweet, use TweetDeck), while digital literacy would include in-depth questions

      I define digital skills as knowing how to work a kind of technology, whereas digital literacy is the knowledge of how a kind of technology works. One is not better than the other, however. If someone or some group wants to accomplish a goal using technology, they're going to need both literacy and skill. Having little skill with a lot of literacy would be like knowing how a car engine works on a technical scale, but not being able to fix it if your car broke down. Having little literacy with a lot of skill would be like having a bad teacher for a subject. They understand the material, perhaps even demonstrate mastery, but they cannot teach their knowledge to others because of the communication gap.

    3. Digital skills focus on what and how. Digital literacy focuses on why, when, who, and for whom

      It is important to understand the digital skills and literacies that a teacher should be able to teach his/her students.

  8. Jul 2016
    1. In closing, try this experiment: Think of the kid who was the best player on your first rec-league soccer team, or in Little League baseball, or Pop Warner football. Now think of that one kid you knew in grade school or high school who went on to play in the pros, or at least Division I. Doesn’t matter which sport.

      In this paragraph they are talking about how a kid in your first rec-league soccer or in little league baseball. Now come to think of that kids as a professional or atleast premier league. This paragraph relates to me because I have friend that started playing soccer with but they are now In a camp which I hopefully will be going to.

    2. The great thing about team sports is that the most important qualities are transferrable. Speed, power, reaction time, movement skills, and hand-eye coordination carry over from one to another

      In this paragraph their are talking about how team work important qualities which are speed power,movement skills etc. This defiantly relates to me because I play for a soccer team which has the same momentum. The fact we have to work on all type of skill set.

  9. Mar 2016
    1. describing how the beginning introduces the story and the ending concludes the action

      This standard requires the students to know how the beginning or introduction usually talks about the important problems the characters have along with information about characters. Also, the students know the conclusion usually talks about how the characters solve their problems.

    2. With prompting and support, describe the relationship between illustrations and the text in which they appear (

      This standard requires students to know what an illustration is and how they are different from the words in a text. The skill required of students is making connections between the illustrations they see and the story that is being told. A good book for this standard would be No David! The story in this book is mostly told through pictures while the words on the page say things like "No, David!"

    3. Identify the main purpose of a text, including what the author wants to answer, explain, or describe

      This standard requires students to know how to read and to know the role of the author of a text. The skill required is students having to find a meaning in the text that is not worded on the pages. This standard requires students to think deeply about the text in order to find the author's purpose in writing it. A good text to use for this standard would be Green Eggs and Ham. Students would have to think about how the green eggs and ham could relate to their own lives. The main point of this story is fairly easy to understand, it is that you should try food before you say you don't like it, something many elementary students may be able to relate to.

    4. With prompting and support, identify basic similarities in and differences between two texts on the same topic (e.g., in

      This standard requires students to know and remember what happens in two different texts. The skill is that students must compare the two texts and talk about them together rather than individually. Two books that would be good for this standard are Brown Bear, Brown Bear and Polar Bear, Polar Bear. Though these books are different it is fairly easy to see their similarities. While Brown Bear, Brown Bear, focuses on colors and animals, Polar Bear, Polar Bear focuses on sounds and animals.

    5. Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a

      This standard requires students to have knowledge of the details of a text in order to answer the "where, when, why, what, and how" questions. The skill that is required is that students must think deeply about the text in order to answer questions that are not written in the book. A good book for this would be The Cat in The Hat by Dr. Suess. There are a lot of things going on in this book, and the answer to these questions would be easier to find for young readers. For example, if the question is "why did the cat in the hat show up?" students can see that the kids in the story were complaining about boredom right before he showed up, and thus conclude that the cat and the hat showed up to entertain the kids.

    6. ntify the main topic and retell key details of a te

      In order for students to accomplish this standard they must know what happened in the story and remember specific details. The skill this standard requires is to think about the text as a whole in order to figure out it's main topic. A good book for this would be "brown bear brown bear." Students would have to figure out what is reoccurring in the novel in order to find it's topic. The repeated topics are colors and animals.

  10. Feb 2016
    1. Use illustrations and details

      First graders must be able to utilize illustrations and details in a story in order to describe the characters, setting, or events.

    2. using key details.

      Grade 1 students must be able to use key details in order to describe the characters, settings and major events.

    3. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

      Students need to be able to give examples from the text after reading and be able to explain what the detail means.

    4. Describe

      Fourth graders must be able to retell the details of a character, setting, or event in their own words using what they remember from the text.

    5. supply rhythm and meaning in a story, poem, or song

      Second graders must be able to think about why specific words are chosen and what they add to the text.

    6. explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events.

      A third grader must be able to identify how the characters' actions affect the plot.

    7. referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers

      Third graders must be able to reference specific moments and details in the text.

    8. Retell

      First graders must be able to retell the story in their own words.

    9. Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.

      Second graders must be able to think of a reason why events in the story happened, using their knowledge of characters, setting and plot

    10. Compare and contrast the themes, settings, and plots of stories written by the same author about the same or similar characters (e.g., in books from a series).

      Students identify key details, about plots and settings of different stories that have the same or similar characters and they are written by the same author. Students will see this commonly in series books.

    11. Ask and answer questions about key details in a text

      Students who ask questions by using words such as who, why, what, where, and when, expand their understanding of a text. They also use words such as setting, events, and characters.

    12. Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text

      Students must read a wide variety of fiction story types, understand the moral, and explain what key details help identify it. I think stories about the greek gods would be fun and exciting for kids, possibly Hercules as a book and movie follow up.

    13. describe the relationship

      Students need to be able to convey what they are seeing in an illustration and compare it to the text that was read.

    14. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

      Fifth grade students should have the ability to accurately cite and draw on the text they have read.This is a necessary skill that they will need to develop for their further education

    15. With prompting and support, compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in familiar stories.9.Compare and contrast the adventures and experiences of characters in stories

      These two standards show the difference in skill and knowledge that a student should have from the end of kindergarten to the end of first grade. In kindergarten the student should be able to compare and contrast elements of familiar stories with prompting, but by the end of first grade students should be able to do this with all stories by only illustrations, and without any prompting. This is a good example of how the expectations work on the same skill, but become a more difficult task as the students progress through each grade.

    16. Explain major differences between books that tell stories and books that give information, drawing on a wide reading of a range of text types.

      This is a skill that first grade students should have. They should be able to tell the difference between fiction and non fiction, and what separates them from one another.

    17. Recognize common types of texts (e.g., storybooks, poems).

      Kindergarten students need to be able to recognize the different types of texts that are available. This is a knowledge for kindergartners because it is all about sorting through different material that may be given, and is a simple identifying task.

    18. Identify words and phrases in stories or poems that suggest feelings or appeal to the sens

      A first grade students should be able to, while reading a text, pick out specific words that refer or appeal to the five senses or an emotion.

      Skill

      A good example of a book for this standard would be You Can't Taste a Pickle With Your Ear. This book is a fun way to have students pick out words or phrases that refer to the five senses and have them understand the difference between them all.

    19. dentify

      Students need to be able to pint out characters in stories.

  11. Aug 2015
  12. Oct 2013
    1. It is a remark constantly made by some that an orator must be skilled in all arts if he is to speak upon all subjects. I might reply to this in the words of Cicero, in whom I find this passage: "In my opinion, no man can become a thoroughly accomplished orator unless he shall have attained a knowledge of every subject of importance and of all the liberal arts," but for my argument, it is sufficient that an orator be acquainted with the subject on which he has to speak.

      So the orator does not have to have mastery over that which he speaks, but have thoroughly researched it.

    1. I AM aware that it is also a question whether nature or learning contributes most to oratory. This inquiry, however, has no concern with the subject of my work, for a perfect orator can be formed only with the aid of bot

      need both

  13. Sep 2013
    1. For ability, whether in speech or in any other activity, is found in those who are well endowed by nature and have been schooled by practical experience.(17) Formal training makes such men more skilfull

      Natural ability, experience, and training all contribute to skill. It's complex, fed by many factors

    1. in a contest with a man of any other profession the rhetorician more than any one would have the power of getting himself chosen, for he can speak more persuasively to the multitude than any of them, and on any subject. Such is the nature and power of the art of rhetoric!

      Rhetoric is about being able to present material in a way the audience can understand, a skill that is not found in other discourses or arts.