597 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Why don’t we put the “create user” task onto the failure track, and in case of successfully persisting the new user, we deviate back to the happy path?
    2. To implement such an activity, we only need to rewire the second step’s failure output to a new terminus.
    3. Since you can reference outputs by their semantic, you as a modeller only connect conceptual termini to ongoing connections!
    4. it’s a bit as if the following wiring is applied to every task added via #step
    5. Visualized, our new composed structure would look as follows.
    6. Suppose that the validate task was getting quite complex and bloated. When writing “normal” Ruby, you’d break up one method into several. In Trailblazer, that’s when you introduce a new, smaller activity.
    1. Our new feature, Total Cookie Protection, works by maintaining a separate “cookie jar” for each website you visit. Any time a website, or third-party content embedded in a website, deposits a cookie in your browser, that cookie is confined to the cookie jar assigned to that website, such that it is not allowed to be shared with any other website.
    1. The absence of a method name here is per design: this object does only one thing, and hence what it does is reflected in the class name.
    1. To whom did you sell your keys and at what kind of rates? https://steamcommunity.com/id/playa131 for example resells them and might be the source for DIG's purchases.
    2. Do you have collaborators who could have generated keys and sold them on their own? DIG's Steam keys and other stores' Steam keys must have some source, after all. Keys don't generate themselves, and only your accounts should be able to request them.This particular game was in Bunch Keys Indie Wizardry Bundle. I assume you had a proper contract for that. Maybe DIG or an intermediary bought 50-200 copies of it?
    3. It isn't stealing because you or an associate must have generated and given them the keys in some way or another?Ideally you would ask a DIG bundle buyer to show you their key for your game, so you can figure out what key request batch it came from, and then you can scratch your head and wonder who you gave those keys to and what journey they took afterwards.
    1. URI::MailTo::EMAIL_REGEXP

      First time I've seen someone create a validator by simply matching against URI::MailTo::EMAIL_REGEXP from std lib. More often you see people copying and pasting some really long regex that they don't understand and is probably not loose enough. It's much better, though, to simply reuse a standard one from a library — by reference, rather than copying and pasting!!

  2. Feb 2021
    1. step :policy, before: :create_model
    2. the validate task gets removed, assuming the Admin won’t need a validation
    3. step Subprocess(Memo::Validate), Output(:invalid_params) => Track(:failure)
    4. While you could nest an activity into another manually, the Subprocess macro will come in handy.
    5. The Track() function will snap the output to the next task that is “magnetic to” the track’s semantic.
    6. step :charge_creditcard, Output(:failure) => End(:declined)
    7. step :charge_creditcard, Output(:failure) => End(:success) end This reconnects both outputs to the same end, always ending in a - desirable, yet unrealistic - successful state.
    8. step :find_provider, Output(UsePaypal, :paypal) => Track(:paypal)
    1. Regardless of origin, allow/deny are simply clearer terms that does not require tracing the history of black/white as representations of that meaning. We can simply use the meaning directly.
    1. It seems like such a beautiful little visual novel and while I wasn’t expecting a masterpiece of localisation based on its low price, I was expecting to be able to read it. But that just cannot be done. Developers from Japan, China, Taiwan, Indonesia, and every other emerging game development centre through Asia-Pacific, listen to me carefully: You can have the most beautiful aesthetics and a heartwarming concept for your game. If the localisation isn’t going to be good, though, do not bother with an English release, because it is going to get reviews like this one. Make “invest in proper translation” your big resolution for 2021. I do not want to play any other games like Lily in the Hollow - Resurrection ever again.
    1. This text wound up founding the discipline which we today call "metaphysics", and one way to describe what this subject encompasses is that it covers things at a level of abstraction above physics.
    1. In the telecommunications industry, on a conceptual level, value-added services add value to the standard service offering, spurring subscribers to use their phone more and allowing the operator to drive up their average revenue per user.
    1. note that TRB source code modifications are not proprietary

      In other words, you can build on this software in your proprietary software but can't change the Trailblazer source unless you're willing to contribute it back.

      loophole: I wonder if this will actually just push people to move their code -- which at the core is/would be a direction modification to the source code - out to a separate module. That's so easy to do with Ruby, so this restriction hardly seems like it would have any effect on encouraging contributions.

    1. Why then sending the SIGINT manually to the shell doesn't kill the child, e.g. 'kill -2 <shell-pid>' doesn't do anything to a child process while Ctrl-C kills it?
    1. The idea of the script is this: most of the important logic runs in a subshell which is piped through tee and to a logfile, so I don't have to tee every single line of the main logic to get it all logged.
    1. There are times where it is useful to know whether a value was passed to run or the result of a filter default. In particular, it is useful when nil is an acceptable value.

      Yes! An illustration in ruby:

      main > h = {key_with_nil_value: nil}
      => {:key_with_nil_value=>nil}
      
      main > h[:key_with_nil_value]
      => nil
      
      main > h[:missing_key]  # this would be undefined in JavaScript (a useful distinction) rather than null, but in Ruby it's indistinguishable from the case where a nil value was actually explicitly _supplied_ by the caller/user
      => nil
      
      # so we have to check for "missingness" ("undefinedness"?) differently in Ruby
      
      main > h.key?(:key_with_nil_value)
      => true
      
      main > h.key?(:missing_key)
      => false
      

      This is one unfortunate side effect of Ruby having only nil and no built-in way to distinguish between null and undefined like in JavaScript.

    2. def edit account = find_account! @account = UpdateAccount.new( account: account, first_name: account.first_name, last_name: account.last_name) end
    3. Record filters allow you to require an instance of a particular class (or one of its subclasses) or a value that can be used to locate an instance of the object. If the value does not match, it will call find on the class of the record. This is particularly useful when working with ActiveRecord objects.
    4. > RecordInteraction.run!(encoding: 'ascii') => #<Encoding:US-ASCII>

      Makes use of the fact that you can do:

      main > Encoding.find('ascii')
      => #<Encoding:US-ASCII>
      

      and that

      If the value does not match, it will call find on the class of the record.

    5. If ActiveModel deals with your nouns, then ActiveInteraction handles your verbs.

      It's a good analogy, but I think it's misleading/confusing/unclear/incorrect, because parts of ActiveInteraction are ActiveModel, so I guess ActiveInteraction deals with your nouns too?

    6. ActiveInteraction also supports merging errors. This is useful if you want to delegate validation to some other object. For example, if you have an interaction that updates a record, you might want that record to validate itself. By using the #merge! helper on errors, you can do exactly that.
    7. Inside the interaction, we could use #find instead of #find_by_id. That way we wouldn't need the #find_account! helper method in the controller because the error would bubble all the way up. However, you should try to avoid raising errors from interactions. If you do, you'll have to deal with raised exceptions as well as the validity of the outcome.

      What they're referring to:

      Account.find('invalid') will raise an error but Account.find_by(id: 'invalid') will not.

    8. For this one we'll define a helper method to handle raising the correct errors. We have to do this because calling .run! would raise an ActiveInteraction::InvalidInteractionError instead of an ActiveRecord::RecordNotFound. That means Rails would render a 500 instead of a 404.

      True, but why couldn't it handle this for us?

    1. {a: 1, b: 2, c: 3, d: 4} => {a:, b:, **rest} # a == 1, b == 2, rest == {:c=>3, :d=>4}

      equivalent in javascript:

      {a, b, ...rest} = {a: 1, b: 2, c: 3, d: 4}
      

      Not a bad replacement for that! I still find javascript's syntax a little more easily readable and natural, but given that we can't use the same syntax (probably because it would be incompatible with existing syntax rules that we can't break for compatibility reasons, unfortunately), this is a pretty good compromise/solution that they've come up with.

    1. What we do collect:The translated words you encounter so that we know what words you are exposed to and can serve up appropriate vocabulary quizzes.Any vocabulary quizzes you see and the results of those quizzes so that we can keep track of how well you know each vocabulary concept.Anonymized (not linked to anyone's particular account) web page URLs, whether translations show up on them, and whether any bugs or errors occur on those pages so that we can better detect any broad issues affecting our user base.
    1. Uses
    2. The central ideas of this design pattern closely mirror the semantics of first-class functions and higher-order functions in functional programming languages. Specifically, the invoker object is a higher-order function of which the command object is a first-class argument.
    1. describe '.validate(context, filters, inputs)' do let(:inputs) { {} } let(:filter) { ActiveInteraction::Filter.new(:name, {}) } let(:interaction) do
    1. Does that make it so? Not for me. Were it simply a matter of words, I wouldn't write another word on the matter. But there are two distinct concepts behind these terms, concepts engendered separately and best understood separately.
    1. In a rule-based system, a metarule is a rule governing the application of other rules.
    2. The modern sense of "an X about X" has given rise to concepts like "meta-cognition" (cognition about cognition), "meta-emotion" (emotion about emotion), "meta-discussion" (discussion about discussion), "meta-joke" (joke about jokes), and "metaprogramming" (writing programs that manipulate programs).
    1. People often hear what they think should be said, not the words that are actually spoken. This comes from the tendency of people to think faster than they talk. A listener makes assumptions about what they expect because their minds race ahead. This can be especially problematic when you misinterpret what your boss said. 
    1. The more important point comes from a program design perspective. Here, "programming to an interface" means focusing your design on what the code is doing, not how it does it. This is a vital distinction that pushes your design towards correctness and flexibility.
    2. My understanding of "programming to an interface" is different than what the question or the other answers suggest. Which is not to say that my understanding is correct, or that the things in the other answers aren't good ideas, just that they're not what I think of when I hear that term.
    3. If the program was important enough, Microsoft might actually go ahead and add some hack to their implementation so the the program would continue to work, but the cost of that is increased complexity (with all the ensuing problems) of the Windows code. It also makes life extra-hard for the Wine people, because they try to implement the WinAPI as well, but they can only refer to the documentation for how to do this, which leads to many programs not working as they should because they (accidentally or intentionally) rely on some implementation detail.
    4. Say you have software to keep track of your grocery list. In the 80's, this software would work against a command line and some flat files on floppy disk. Then you got a UI. Then you maybe put the list in the database. Later on it maybe moved to the cloud or mobile phones or facebook integration. If you designed your code specifically around the implementation (floppy disks and command lines) you would be ill-prepared for changes. If you designed your code around the interface (manipulating a grocery list) then the implementation is free to change.
    5. It's more like providing an Employee object rather than the set of linked tables you use to store an Employee record. Or providing an interface to iterate through songs, and not caring if those songs are shuffled, or on a CD, or streaming from the internet. They're just a sequence of songs.
    1. The word home, for instance, has a denotation of “the place (such as a house or apartment) where a person lives,” but it may additionally have many connotations (such as “warmth,” “security,” or “childhood”) for some people.
    1. Encapsulation is used to hide the values or state of a structured data object inside a class, preventing direct access to them by clients in a way that could expose hidden implementation details or violate state invariance maintained by the methods.
    1. As I reported in #10, error keys get duplicated and we should namespace them. This code behaves right like AR::Base accept_nested_attributes
    1. class ConferencesController def create conference = Conference.new @conference_form = ConferenceForm.new(conference) @conference_form.submit(conference_params) if @conference_form.save redirect_to @conference_form, notice: "Conference: #{@conference_form.name} was successfully created." } else render :new end end end
    1. For now I feel ActiveForm is still a bit early to transition to a gem  as there are still things to improve and work out. One day I'll invest more time into making it extendable and release it as a gem. For now I feel it's an unnecessary complexity.

      If he's like most of us, though, this means it will never happen...

    2. we get the benefit of isolating request specific logic without cramming it into a ActiveRecord model that will be used in multiple controllers/actions

      request-specific logic

    3. I typically save everything I can first, and then call the side-effects afterwards. If the side-effects fail I can handle them elsewhere and retry when necessary.
    4. I've been over the use case for form objects in this post on moving away from fat models but wanted to go into more detail on how and why I use them here. I really believe in the utility of these objects; their ability to abstract and isolate logic in a simple and effective manner is unmatched, IMO.
    1. Have you ever been emailed something from a company and tried to reply only to be frustrated with a failed-to-send message response? A no-reply email frustrates your customers.Instead, use a dedicated email to send out your messages and to keep business emails in a central location so you can answer customer concerns quickly and decisively. This level of customer service will help develop your reputation as a company that cares about its customers.
    1. An intent filter is an expression in an app's manifest file that specifies the type of intents that the component would like to receive. For instance, by declaring an intent filter for an activity, you make it possible for other apps to directly start your activity with a certain kind of intent. Likewise, if you do not declare any intent filters for an activity, then it can be started only with an explicit intent.
    1. Great pricing plan names that illustrate the type of plan you’re about to choose – from simple “hammering” for quick storage to the full blown “crane” offering unlimited storage.
    1. 100vw is 100% of the viewport width not accounting for scrollbars (unless the root element has anything other than overflow: auto set, but auto is the default value). Thus, when the page content overflows the viewport vertically, the browser renders the vertical scroll bar, which reduces the visible viewport area by a few pixels. But the 100vw value doesn't update to account for this, so the selected div retains the same width as before the vertical scrollbar appeared. This results in the horizontal scroll bar rendering.
    1. Unlike naming children, coding involves naming things on a daily basis. When you write code, naming things isn’t just hard, it’s a relentless demand for creativity. Fortunately, programmers are creative people.
    2. If we renamed things more often, then it probably wouldn’t be so hard to name them in the first place.
    3. This is funny because it’s unexpected. Cache invalidation sounds like a hard thing, while naming sounds more straightforward. The joke works because it violates our expectation that hard things should be technical. It’s also funny because it’s true.
    4. Scalability is the problem you want to have, and sooner rather than later, but maintainability is the problem you’re definitely going to have, sooner or later.
    5. Naming matters for both idealogical and practical reasons.
    1. Space: Suppose we had infinite memory, then cache all the data; but we don't so we have to decide what to cache that is meaningful to have the cache implemented (is a ??K cache size enough for your use case? Should you add more?) - It's the balance with the resources available.
    2. Time: Suppose all your data was immutable, then cache all the data indefinitely. But this isn't always to case so you have to figure out what works for the given scenario (A person's mailing address doesn't change often, but their GPS position does).
    1. So the hard and unsolvable problem becomes: how up-to-date do you really need to be?
    2. After considering the value we place, and the tradeoffs we make, when it comes to knowing anything of significance, I think it becomes much easier to understand why cache invalidation is one of the hard problems in computer science

      the crux of the problem is: trade-offs

    3. the 2 hardest problems in computer science are essentially the 2 hardest problems of life in general, as far as humans and information are concerned.
    4. The non-determinism is why cache invalidation — and that other hard problem, naming things — are uniquely and intractably hard problems in computer science. Computers can perfectly solve deterministic problems. But they can’t predict when to invalidate a cache because, ultimately, we, the humans who design and build computational processes, can’t agree on when a cache needs to be invalidated.
    5. you began by first finding out if your crush was already in a relationship. If so, you then did what you could in your power to have the most most up-to-date information on their relationship status. The downside of outdated data is self-evident: you want to move in at the first sign of the current relationship dissolving.
    1. Now let me ask you, do you write JS for a single page application differently from a "traditional" web application? I sure hope you do! In a "traditional" application, you can get away with being sloppy because every time the user navigates to a new page, their browser destroys the DOM and the JavaScript context. SPAs, though, require a more thoughtful approach.
    1. Not to mention 80% of our sales are laptops and desktops running, you guessed it, a Linux desktop. So, unlike Red Hat and Canonical, we live or die based on how good that experience is.
    2. the most productive environment possible for people that use their computer to create.What is a productive environment?How do you measure productivity in an operating system environment?How do you compare YOUR distribution to other distributions when it comes to productivity?Is the way in which 'people that use their computer to create' (creators) the same across all professions and activities?Does a photographer have the same requirements for a productive environment as a software engineer?Why do you think your distribution will be the best for delivering a productive environment than any other Linux distribution?
    1. Think about how much you want to customize the desktop environment(DE), and whether you know how to do so. Pick a distro that has the DE you like.
    2. When people talk about "beginner distros" they mean distros that are no hassle to get started, it doesnt mean they are somewhat inferior or less capable.
    1. Jan 2021. I use a small, dedicated enterprise grade SSD as a swap drive. These enterprise drives can be bought for as little as $80 for 240GB right now, and are 3D nand with load leveling and other valuable improvements for swap. By using the drive only for swap, you pretty much guarantee it won’t affect your expensive terabyte level data drive should it fail, and you still get the performance of SSD. Estimates for very heavy use are about 2 1/2 years.
    1. justify-content Sometimes the total size of your grid might be less than the size of its grid container. This could happen if all of your grid items are sized with non-flexible units like px. In this case you can set the alignment of the grid within the grid container.
    1. The first problem is that if you ever remove an item, there will be a big black block in the layout. Maybe that’s OK, but more likely it isn’t. The second problem is that grid containers do not, by default, shrink-wrap their items. Instead, they fill out the parent element, as block boxes do. Both of these problems are illustrated in Figure 6.
    2. #ttt > * { border: 1px solid black; border-width: 0 1px 1px 0; display: flex; /* flex styling to center content in divs */ align-items: center; justify-content: center; } #ttt > *:nth-of-type(3n) { border-right-width: 0; } #ttt > *:nth-of-type(n+7) { border-bottom-width: 0; }
    1. .box1 { grid-column-start: 1; grid-column-end: 4; grid-row-start: 1; grid-row-end: 3; } .box2 { grid-column-start: 1; grid-row-start: 2; grid-row-end: 4; }
    1. Then recently I was shopping at the John Lewis website, and they brought up the Verified By Visa page in an iframe - wonderful! I'm still looking at the John Lewis site, and all that's happening is I'm being asked for my Verified By Visa password - no problem. Although as a web developer I know that there's no technical difference between that and a plain old redirect-there-redirect-back, the user experience is so much better!
    1. The "World Population", "Born with No Access to the Gospel Today", "Deaths without Christ Today" counters are sobering.

  3. Jan 2021
    1. Science’s culture of critique discourages groupthink, countermands the effects of human biases, and protects knowledge, not only by rewarding a dispassionate stance toward the subject and institutionalizing organized skepticism but also by fostering competition among scientists able to replicate and hence challenge each other’s work.

      Great aspirations, but how well are they actually achieved in practice/reality?

    1. For the future, you should: Install LTS (Long-term support) versions as they have an 8-year life span (with Extended Security Maintenance) or 5 years without. The current LTS version is Ubuntu 18.04.1 LTS Bionic Beaver released on July 26, 2018 with an EOL in April 2023. OR Carefully watch the EOL of the interim / development releases and upgrade frequently.
    1. config.action_mailer.register_preview_interceptor :css_inline_styler

      That's probably the same hook that https://github.com/fphilipe/premailer-rails ties into, for it says:

      Emails are only processed upon delivery, i.e. when calling #deliver on the email, or when previewing them in rails.

    1. cellular data recorders offer the capacity to measure biologically relevant signals15,16,17,18,19 in places that are otherwise difficult to access, such as inside the body20,21, and over time22
    2. Recently, redox-responsive biomolecules such as phenazines have been used in several electrochemical strategies to interrogate a range of biological activities30,31 and to control gene expression in living cells32,33, where the redox status of the biomolecules could be measured or manipulated by application of electronic potentials
    1. Maybe $$slots like $$props? My use case is that I'd like to wrap a slot's content in an element that applies styling that I'd like absent without the slotted content. Something like this: {#if $$slots.description} <div class="description"> <slot name="description"></slot> </div> {/if}
    2. It isn’t always guaranteed to be a single root element, in that case it could return an array of elements?
    1. Basically the typescript compiler emits no code for interfaces, so webpack can not find them in the compiled module; except when a module consists of only interfaces. In that case the module will end up completely empty and then webpack will not investigate the exports.
    1. I want to make some add-ons or wrappers on components e.g BigButton.svelte <script> import Button from './Button.svelte' </script> <Button fz="16" h="64" {...$$props}> <slot slot="prepend" name="prepend" /> <slot /> <slot slot="append" name="append" /> </Button>
    1. I don't know what I'd expect this to do, if not create an infinite loop. You're asking Svelte to do something before every update, and one of the things you're asking it to do is to flush any pending changes and trigger an update.
    1. beforeUpdate(async () => { console.log('the component is about to update'); await tick(); console.log('the component just updated'); });
    1. In other words, programs that send messages to other machines (or to other programs on the same machine) should conform completely to the specifications, but programs that receive messages should accept non-conformant input as long as the meaning is clear.
    1. This is a dynamic value because of hybrid devices which can use a mix of mouse and touch input.
    2. You may want the tippy to appear at a different location from its trigger (event listeners) target. For example:
    1. if you set text-decoration: underline for all links then you will have to set text-decoration: none for special links which you don't need an underline.
    1. Avoid apologies (“Sorry for the interruption”), alarm (“Warning!”), or ambiguity (“Are you sure?”)
    1. For example, we might request some data from a stock exchange API, and along with our usual API parameters, we give it a callback, like ?callback=callThisWhenReady. The web service then wraps the data with our function and returns it like this: callThisWhenReady({...data...}). Now as soon as the script loads, your browser will try to execute it (as normal), which in turns calls our arbitrary function and feeds us the data we wanted.
    1. It’s all very well telling Canonical what to do, but someone needs to pay those developers for their time. It’s not free.
    2. Repeatedly posting in this thread that there are problems, won’t actually get anything fixed.
    3. The best place to let the developers know, and track those bugs is in the bug tracker. There are hundreds of forums online, all over the place in many languages. We can’t be expected to read all of them. Anyone with a launchpad ID (thus, anyone who has an account on this discourse instance) has the capability to file a bug. I’d strongly recommend doing so, for each specific issue. Taking just a few minutes to do that will help tremendously.
    4. Just saying “snaps are slow” is not helpful to anyone. Because frankly, they’re not. Some might be, but others aren’t. Using blanket statements which are wildly inaccurate will not help your argument. Bring data to the discussion, not hearsay or hyperbole.