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  1. Last 7 days
  2. Nov 2021
    1. Quando è consigliato postare su linkedin?

      • Il consiglio è di postare in questi giorni:
        • Martedì;
        • Giovedì;
        • Sabato; Gli orari in cui è consigliato pubblicare sono compresi tra le 8 e le 10 Una volta pubblicato il contenuto, linkedin lo mostrerà ad un gruppo di utenti in test A seconda dell'engagement di questo gruppo di test nel corso delle 2 ore successive alla pubblicazione allora la copertura del post aumenterà o diminuirà.

      In termini di metriche è più importante portare le persone a cliccare sul tasto "Visualizza altro" invece che sul "consiglia" o qualche altra reazione. Per questo è necessario scrivere post della lunghezza di 1200-2000 caratteri. La metrica più importante è quindi quella del "dwell time", quella che indica quanto tempo le persone passano sul proprio post e che deve essere il più alto possibile (per questo è necessario aumentare questa metrica utilizzando formati adatti come il carosello, i video, i post lunghi ecc)

      Altra metrica molto più importante della reazione è il commento. Il commento è 4 volte più forte di una delle reazioni più semplici ed è 7 volte più potente se tale commento è dato nelle prime due ore.

      L'impatto di lasciare un commento di più di 5 parole risulterà in un +8% per chi ha creato il post e del +6% per la persona che ha commentato. Se la prima persona che lascia il primo commento è quella che ha scritto il post allora la copertura decresce di un ammontare tra il -45% ed il -20%.

      Riguardo la modalità creatore, questa aiuta e non aiuta a fare cose: non aumenta la copertura dei tuoi post; sposta la copertura dai tuoi collegamenti ai tuoi follower; aumenta la copertura dei tuoi contenuti se i tuoi contenuti contengono gli hashtag che hai definito nel tuo profilo. riduce il numero di richieste di collegamento verso di te del triplo

      Se contribuisci in maniera coinvolta coi contenuti dei tuoi collegamenti allora anche i tuoi post avranno più engagement.

      Il numero ideale di hashtag da utilizzare nei tuoi post è tra i 3 ed i 5 Inoltre è consigliato utilizzare un personal hashtag

  3. Oct 2021
    1. COPE

      Create Once, Publish Everywhere

      So when I talk about adaptive content, I popularized a case study from NPR in which they outlined their catchily-named approach to publishing web content, which they called COPE. It stands for Create Once, Publish Everywhere. And in NPR’s model, they maintain a single content model for their article form. So in this content structure, they would have for an article a title, a short title, a teaser, a short teaser, several images attached to the article, an audio file, the body text, whatever metadata was attached to the article, and they could serve up a different combination of that more granular content based on the type of device someone was using.

    2. Adaptive: Content, Context, and Controversy
    1. For myself, Symphony was a proving ground for the COPE approach to content strategy and content management championed by Karen McGrane: create once publish everywhere.
    1. COPE: Create Once, Publish Everywhere

      Adaptive Content

      COPE: Create Once, Publish Everywhere

      With the growing need and ability to be portable comes tremendous opportunity for content providers. But it also requires substantial changes to their thinking and their systems.

  4. getuikit.com getuikit.com
    1. WordPress & Joomla from the UIkit creators

      Run for Water

      I used one of these themes for the redesign of the Run for Water site. I transitioned away from Jamstack, because the organization is centred around volunteers, and it was important to empower them to easily make changes to the marketing front end of their organization. The WordPress theme has a beautiful interface for managing content. However, it goes against the philosophy of COPE (Create Once, Publish Everywhere), recommended by Karen McGrane in her presentations on Content in a Zombie Apocalypse.

      Symphony

      My interest in the subject of Adaptive Content goes back to the days when Symphony was my tool of choice.

  5. Sep 2021
    1. the actionable content should be human-centered, i.e., should carry an emotional connection.

      CTA objectivity

    2. Reviews and ratings Product videos Product features and highlights Clear, high-resolution images

      B2B website assets

    3. B2B eCommerce websites need to focus on: Buying guides Product videos, explainer videos Articles and blog posts 24/7 customer support Case Studies

      B2B content ideas

    1. In one SEMrush study, articles with at least 3,000 words generated 3X more traffic, 4X more shares, and 3.5X more backlinks than short-form articles.

      SEO hack

      find new topics to write

    2. than outbound marketing

      check outbound vs inbound marketing

    1. aware of your competitors and establish ways to differentiate your company from them,

      figure competitors

    2. Content marketing is a strategic inbound marketing approach focused on creating and distributing valuable, relevant, and educational content digitally to attract, retain, and qualify potential new leads.  

      content marketing def

    3. If your company is able to rank on search engines, such as Google, for targeted keywords and phrases, you can drive awareness of your brand.

      SEO

    4. LinkedIn Facebook, Instagram, Twitter

      B2B VS B2C

      platform specific strategy needed

    1. brand’s story.

      content strategy objective

    2. Learn about their buying behaviors and notice how much time it takes for the person to turn into a customer. Notice the open rates and click rates of emails to learn what kind of products they are interested in and customize future emails accordingly.

      email marketing tips

    3. There’s a lot you can post on social media – experiment with BTS videos, memes, tips and tricks, clothing inspo, etc.

      SM tips

  6. Aug 2021
    1. If we cannot afford real, diverse, and independent assessment, we will not realize the promise of middleware.
    2. Building on platforms' stores of user-generated content, competing middleware services could offer feeds curated according to alternate ranking, labeling, or content-moderation rules.

      Already I can see too many companies relying on artificial intelligence to sort and filter this material and it has the ability to cause even worse nth degree level problems.

      Allowing the end user to easily control the content curation and filtering will be absolutely necessary, and even then, customer desire to do this will likely loose out to the automaticity of AI. Customer laziness will likely win the day on this, so the design around it must be robust.

  7. Jul 2021
    1. Thus we can roughly define what we mean by the art of reading as follows: the process whereby a mind, with nothing to operate on but the symbols of the readable matter, and with no help from outside, 0 elevates itself by the power of its own operations. The mind passes from understanding less to under­standing more. The skilled operations that cause this to hap­pen are the various acts that constitute the art of reading.

      I'm not sure I agree with this perspective of not necessarily asking for outside help.

      What if the author is at fault for not communicating properly or leaving things too obscure? Is this the exception of which he speaks?

      What if the author isn't properly contextualizing all the necessary information to the reader? This can be a particular problem when writing history across large spans of both time and culture or even language.

    1. Matt Taibbi asked his subscribers in April. Since they were “now functionally my editor,” he was seeking their advice on potential reporting projects. One suggestion — that he write about Ibram X. Kendi and Robin DiAngelo — swiftly gave way to a long debate among readers over whether race was biological.

      There's something here that's akin to the idea of bikeshedding? Online communities flock to the low lying ideas upon which they can proffer an opinion and play at the idea of debate. If they really cared, wouldn't they instead delve into the research and topics themselves? Do they really want Taibbi's specific take? Do they want or need his opinion on the topic? What do they really want?

      Compare and cross reference this with the ideas presented by Ibram X. Kendi's article There Is No Debate Over Critical Race Theory.

      Are people looking for the social equivalent of a simple "system one" conversation or are they ready, willing, and able to delve into a "system two" presentation?

      Compare this also with the modern day version of the Sunday morning news (analysis) shows? They would seem to be interested in substantive policy and debate, but they also require a lot of prior context to participate. In essence, most speakers don't actually engage, but spew out talking points instead and rely on gut reactions and fear, uncertainty and doubt to make their presentations. What happened to the actual discourse? Has there been a shift in how these shows work and present since the rise of the Hard Copy sensationalist presentation? Is the competition for eyeballs weakening these analysis shows?

      How might this all relate to low level mansplaining as well? What are men really trying to communicate in demonstrating this behavior? What do they gain in the long run? What is the evolutionary benefit?

      All these topics seem related somehow within the spectrum of communication and what people look for and choose in what and how they consume content.

    1. Other versions which are available are:

      From CERN, a PDF scan of the original (includes the infamous handwritten note "Vague but exciting...": https://cds.cern.ch/record/1405411/files/ARCH-WWW-4-010.pdf

    1. The operative content object is the content object to which a request is directed – this is the content object that the user specifically wants, and that the request primarily operates on.
    1. https://bmcr.brynmawr.edu/2008/2008.12.41/

      A searing review of David R. Slavitt's translation of Lucretius.

      The "close enough" nature of the translation seems like the intellectual slide shown by too many moderns which decontextualizes our historical precedents. Perhaps fine for a quick view, but could be a slippery slope for taking as part of the basis for Western intellectual tradition.

    1. I like the hovercard-like UI that enables one to see prior versions of links on a page. It would be cool to have this sort of functionality built into preview cards for these as well.

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Jonathan Zittrain</span> in The Rotting Internet Is a Collective Hallucination - The Atlantic (<time class='dt-published'>07/08/2021 22:07:17</time>)</cite></small>

    1. A solid overview article about the architectural deficiencies of the web for long term archival and access as well as some ideas for fixing the issue and a plea to attempt to make things better for the future.

    2. Suppose Google were to change what’s on that page, or reorganize its website anytime between when I’m writing this article and when you’re reading it, eliminating it entirely. Changing what’s there would be an example of content drift; eliminating it entirely is known as link rot.

      We don't talk about content drift very much. I like that some sites, particularly wiki sites, actually document their content drift in diffs and surface that information directly to the user. Why don't we do this for more websites? The Wayback machine also has this sort of feature.

    1. Gemini pages are fast to load, because they cannot include scripts, stylesheets or even images (just links to images, although some clients have options to load these in-line if you want).

      The automatic portion of loading things inline and slowing down a page is part of the issue?

      I'm reminded of seeing the "pull buttons" on Flancian's anagora.org site. He includes links to things like tweets, posts, and could do so for images, but the links have a button next to them that says pull. Clicking on it loads that remote resource. This has the benefit of speeding up the page and can also act as a sort of content warning depending on the particular content.

  8. Jun 2021
    1. History of Computer Aided Language Learning Infographic by E-learning Infographics is included on the basis of fair use as described in the Code of Best Practices in Fair Use for Open Education 

      Attributions for non original content can be handled many ways - due to the brevity and simulated nature of this example, I managed them this way. But as in the original OER, a full attributions page would eventually become necessary for clean attribution and decluttered document layout.

    2. Consider the following infographic

      This would have been selected with SME. I wanted to demonstrate multiple means of representation and use an insert to demonstrate use of Code of Best Practices for Fair Use in OER.

    1. Chapter 4 Revision by Colleen Sanders is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, except where otherwise noted.

      This is where I would work out, with instructor, what license this revision should bear. I opted for CC BY for now, but that could change depending up on whether the instructor wanted to move into remixing more copyrighted/openly licensed content.

    2. Reference List

      I culled the in-text citations to create a structured reference list, then placed it with the conclusions. Students are one click away from the extensively cited works while reading.

    3. Attribution

      Providing attribution for source material

    1. References

      Full list of sources cited in this chapter. In real life, these would all be properly formatted citations with links to articles.

    1. CMC gives language learners access to more knowledgeable individuals, either native speakers of the target language or more advanced nonnative speakers, than they might be able to encounter in a face-to-face environment, thus increasing their potential ability to learn. Indeed, in some environments, CMC provides the only possibility for access to NSs. (p. 12)

      Indented and italicized to offset the quote for navigability and readability.

    1. These little trails of links help users figure out where they are within a website. Often located at the top of a site, breadcrumbs let users see their current location and the proceeding pages. Users are also able to click on them to move between steps.
  9. May 2021
    1. Think of the most common forms of influencer content: There are makeup tutorials and exercise regimens and tips for heterodox diets. There are bathroom selfies and self-portraits in bed and endless I just woke up confessions.
    1. Content Aggregator Website Examples and How to Build One

      How to build a news aggregator website fast, easy and at a lower price? This article won’t answer these questions, because the combination of these characteristics usually goes along with poor quality. Instead, in this post we shall focus on how you can build your aggregator website and why you should. So, let’s dive in and explore.

    1. Audius is trying to avoid SoundCloud’s copyright issues by not hosting the user-uploaded content itself. Its open-source protocol, built on blockchain, means that the responsibility of hosting and making uploaded content available is spread out among people who register as node operators.
  10. Apr 2021
    1. In the coming months and years, we’ll be working to further enable choice for creators, including giving them the power to choose not only how someone wants to create or monetize audio, but also where specific content is able to be consumed, ensuring creators have an opportunity to decide if they are aligned with the platforms distributing their content.

      So this means you're going to use simple, open standards and tooling so that not only Anchor and Spotify will benefit? Or are you going to build closed systems that require the use of proprietary software and thus force subscriptions? Are you going to Balkanize the audio space to force consumers into your product and only your product? Or will producers be able to have a broad selection of platforms to which they could distribute their content?

    1. CSS-generated content is not included in the DOM. Because of this, it will not be represented in the accessibility tree and certain assistive technology/browser combinations will not announce it. If the content conveys information that is critical to understanding the page's purpose, it is better to include it in the main document.
    1. Tangentially is defined as briefly mentioning a subject but not going into it in detail, or is defined as going off in a different direction.

      in the case of

      briefly mentioning a subject but not going into it in detail the topic/subject need not be related at all (it sounds like).

      What about in the case fo:

      is defined as going off in a different direction. Does the fact that it's going off in a different direction imply that it at least starts out connected/related to the original (starting point) subject (as it does in the geometry sense of tangential)? Or does it permit "jumping" to another topic (in another direction) without being related/connected at all??

      I don't think I like this definition very much. It doesn't quite fit the sense I'm trying to use it for in my tag:

      tangentially related content (aside)

      Ah, here's a definition that matches what I thought it meant (one of the senses anyway): https://hyp.is/3Bn2bpZ7Eeu3Ok8vg03AVA/www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/tangential

    1. He frequently interrupted his narrative with amusing asides.

      Aside seems to imply that it is somewhat related, even though not directly related.

    2. a comment or discussion that does not relate directly to the main subject being discussed : digression
    1. It feels like it was thrown together in a weekend using parts from "Think To Die" since even the successful act of feeding your chickens has the same blood-splatter-on-camera-lens that you would get from scoring in Think To Die where your goal is to kill all of your people as opposed to this where you are feeding animals, so what's with the blood splatter? It just shows a lack of attention to detail.
    2. The blood when you get the animal to food is really off putting. It doesn't make sense, is the player suppose to be eating the animal once you get it to food? If the dev just removed that it would make this game MUCH MUCH better.
    1. Terry is concerned by those commonly cited statistics revealing how little time museumgoers spend looking at art, but more upsetting is that most people don’t feel welcome in museums at all. “They’re looking for zero seconds,” he says.

      Being welcoming and inviting can be an important thing. If you're not, then your material is not even considered.

  11. Mar 2021
    1. We added the X-Content-Type-Options: nosniff header to our raw URL responses way back in 2011 as a first step in combating hotlinking. This has the effect of forcing the browser to treat content in accordance with the Content-Type header. That means that when we set Content-Type: text/plain for raw views of files, the browser will refuse to treat that file as JavaScript or CSS.
    1. Take control of it for yourself.

      quite in contrast to the 2021 Congressional Investigation into Online Misinformation and Disinformation which places the responsibility on major platforms (FB, Twitter, YouTube) to moderate and control content.

    1. Q: So, this means you don’t value hearing from readers?A: Not at all. We engage with readers every day, and we are constantly looking for ways to hear and share the diversity of voices across New Jersey. We have built strong communities on social platforms, and readers inform our journalism daily through letters to the editor. We encourage readers to reach out to us, and our contact information is available on this How To Reach Us page.

      We have built strong communities on social platforms

      They have? Really?! I think it's more likely the social platforms have built strong communities which happen to be talking about and sharing the papers content. The paper doesn't have any content moderation or control capabilities on any of these platforms.

      Now it may be the case that there are a broader diversity of voices on those platforms over their own comments sections. This means that a small proportion of potential trolls won't drown out the signal over the noise as may happen in their comments sections online.

      If the paper is really listening on the other platforms, how are they doing it? Isn't reading some or all of it a large portion of content moderation? How do they get notifications of people mentioning them (is it only direct @mentions)?

      Couldn't/wouldn't an IndieWeb version of this help them or work better.

    2. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Inquirer.com</span> in Why we’re removing comments on most of Inquirer.com (<time class='dt-published'>03/18/2021 19:32:19</time>)</cite></small>

    1. Many news organizations have made the decision to eliminate or restrict comments in recent years, from National Public Radio, to The Atlantic, to NJ.com, which did a nice job of explaining the decision when comments were removed from its site.

      A list of journalistic outlets that have removed comments from their websites.

    2. Experience has shown that anything short of 24-hour vigilance on all stories is insufficient.