466 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. “Why don’t you assume you’ve written your book already — and all you have to do now is find it?”

      That is heartening...

    2. Here’s Stephen Harrigan (talking about his book, Big Wonderful Thing: A History of Texas)

      "I think that when it comes to writing books, you have to start before you think you're ready, because you will always feel like you are never ready. I find that as you write the book, the road ahead becomes clearer; before that, the road ahead is just a distraction." ~ Stephen Harrigan

    3. In my experience writing books, it isn’t just a “resistance” thing or a “perfectionist” thing or a fear thing, it’s more about research and wondering if you’ve done enough of it. Research becomes your way of procrastinating, because, let’s face it, research is just more fun than writing. (Me, personally, I became a professional writer so I could be a professional reader.)

      Research is a pure pleasure included in the process of book writing

    4. There’s an awful temptation to just keep on researching. There comes a point where you just have to stop, and start writing. When I began, I thought that the way one should work was to do all the research and then write the book. In time I began to understand that it’s when you start writing that you really find out what you don’t know and need to know.

      Why researching during writing is recommended

    1. Wchodziło długo, prawdziwie odurzony byłem po godzinie. Stan, w którym się znalazłem można określić jednym słowem, ale pisanym koniecznie z wielkiej litery: Spokój. Wielki Spokój, jakby nic złego nigdy się nie działo, jakby moje wnętrze było boską harmonią, idealnie zestrojoną z zachwycającym światem wokół. Myślałem i mówiłem bardzo trzeźwo: być może tak trzeźwo, jak nigdy: wyzbyty bowiem byłem z najmniejszych śladów niepewności, wstydu, nerwów, kompleksów... Było tak, jakbym znalazł w umyśle właściwe drzwiczki, tej najwygodniejszy pokój i rozłożył się w nim, delektując się (w nienarcystyczny sposób) sobą, swoim byciem i byciem, które mnie otaczało: świata, przedmiotów, światła, ludzi, Krzyśka, Andrzeja. Wszystko było dobre, a jeśli nie było - nie było godne uwagi. Zdumiewała mnie refleksja nad idiotyzmem wielkiej części moich codziennych zmartwień, wszystkich tych mniejszych i większych narcyzmów, skupienia na naskórku rzeczywistości. Andrzej w międzyczasie znalazł się w bardzo podobnym stanie, tylko, że połączonym z OEVami (opened eyes' visuals), do tego mówił dużo, gestykulując i intonując jak dziecko: "Przecież to wszystko takie proste...! Takie proste! A ludzie się przejmują!".

      Mystical experience description detected.

  2. Nov 2019
    1. A given variable can sornetimes be measured at different levels. When in doubt, researchers should use the highest leve! of rneasurement ap-propriate to that variable so they can capture the greatest amount of information.

      Variable

    2. The Importance of Variable Names

      Variables

    3. Conceptions, Concepts, and Reality

      Defining concepts

    1. Checklist: Theoretical Framework

      Use this checklist with your theoretical framework.

    2. Concepts often have multiple definitions, so the theoretical framework involves clearly defining what you mean by each term

      It's to know exactly what we mean using a specific concept.

    3. In your thesis or dissertation, the theoretical framework is where you define, discuss and evaluate theories relevant to your research problem.

      It's a place for definitions, right?

    1. recruiting volunteers

      If you feel like participating leave a comment in this thread.

    2. What is a mystical experience?

      define extensively for 3 bit.fuel

  3. Oct 2019
    1. Conceptualization is the process of specifying observations and measurements that give concepts definite meaning for the purposes of a research study.

      What is conceptualization? The way to give meaning to a concept for the ressearch.

    2. Concepts are constructs; they represent the agreed-on meanings we assign to terms

      Concepts represent agreements

    3. Concepts are mental irnages we use as sumrnary devices for bringing together observations and experiences that seem to have something in corn-mon. We use terms or labels to reference these concepts

      What is a concept? Mental images.

    4. Conceptualization, Operationalization, and Measurement

      Conceptualization, Operationalization, and Measurement: an essencial part of this process involves transforming the relatively vague terms of ordinary language into precise objects of study with wel-defined and measurable meanings

    1. Abstract

      Abstract is a sale's pitch, I would say. It summarizes the whole article, and helps the audiences like you and me, to determine whether/how this work might be relevant.

      In the following abstract, identify the research question, highlight it, and state it in your own words (because the authors ask something quite different from what they propose in the beginning).

    1. It is generally agreed that literature surveys and descriptive compilations do not meet the contribution-to-knowledge re-quirement for the dissertation

      What is not accepted.

    2. Positivist versus postpositivist.

      My research is postpositivist

    3. Experimental versus descriptive.

      My research is going to be descriptive.

    4. Quantitative versus qualitative.

      My research is qualitative.

    5. NEW OR IMPROVED ANALYSIS Analysis may be based on existing evidence or include new data.

      Maybe my research leads in this way, but I think is more the previous one.

    6. The evidence may be collected by an experiment, simulation, observations, questionnaire, interviews, or measurements.

      Maybe my research goes in this way: new or improved evidence.

    7. The additive contribution of a dissertation may arise from 1. new or improved evidence; 2. new or improved methodology; 3. new or improved analysis; 4. new or improved concepts or theories.

      Four kind of contributions

    8. The dissertation should be based on a significant question, problem, or hypothesis.

      The power of a good question. That's why we need to learn how and what to ask.

    9. Different approaches to testing of important results. If a researcher has reported interesting results with one research technique and a given research population, a doctoral student may consider replicating the experiment, altering either the research technique or the research population.

      Open science and reproductible science is key here.

    10. Writers of disserta-tions commonly describe further research that needs to be done.

      Work on the results of others.

    11. If there is likely to be a continuing interest, either academically or otherwise on the topic, then a student can continué to maintin scholarly capability in the área and continué to be a significant authority on the subject.

      This is like Bret Victor's Inventing on principle and the question is: what is your principle?

    12. A research project will typicaliy have more than one potential outcome. For example, a research experiment may fail to dis-prove the nuil hypothesis, it may disprove it, or it may be incon-clusive.

      A database of unsuccessful cases is a good thing to have too.

    13. The exploratory investigation, definition of problem, and writing normally take about half of the total time.

      I can use this to measure my time.

    14. If no theory base can be identified, the topic should be rejected

      Theory is mandatory

    15. Observations lead to theory to classify, explain, and predict the observations.

      Sounds like grounded theory, or at least the prediction is something very useful.

    16. Research needed and interesting

      Why my research is needed and interesting?

    17. In reading dissertations, the student should begin to formúlate a general understanding of the structure and scope of a disserta-tion, and the meaning of contribution to knowledge as applied to doctoral dissertations.

      Structure and scope.

    18. The Selection of a Dissertation Topic

      The selection of a dissertation topic

    1. . To summarize: Your aim is to explain 1. what you are writing about —I am working on the topic of... 2. what you don't know about it—because / want tofind out... 3. why you want your reader to know and care about it—m order to help my reader understand better...

      Short and sweet.

    2. add a second indirect question that explains why you asked your first question.

      Here is the so what? in the sentence you are building.

    3. When you add that because I want tofind out how/why/whether clause, you state why you are pursuing your topic: to answer a question important to you.

      Back to the beginning: a question important to you.

    4. because I want to find out who/what/when/where/whether/ why/how .

      This is the flavour: the indirect question.

    5. start by naming your project:

      Put a name to that baby.

    6. SO WHAT?

      Miles Davis was right.

    7. If you are an experienced researcher, look for questions that other researchers ask but don't answer.

      Remember: the idea is to make it interesting. It can lead you where nobody else knows.

    8. How does your topic fit into the context of a larger structure or function as part of a larger system?

      Structure and composition.

    9. Ask about the History of Your Topic

      History of the topic

    10. So the best way to begin working on your focused topic is not to find all the information you can on it, but to formúlate questions that direct you to just that information you need to answer them

      What is my question to find information?

    11. If a writer asks no specific question worth asking, he can offer no specific answer worth supporting.

      The power of the questions.

    12. Caution: Don't narrow your topic so much that you can't find information on it

      Where to stop while you are narrowing.

    13. We narrowed those topics by adding words and phrases, but of a special kind: conflict, description, contribution, and developing. Those nouns are derived from verbs expressing actions or relation-ships: to conflict, to describe, to contribute, and to develop. Lacking such "action" words, your topic is a .static thing.

      Be careful: you need words that describes actions.

    14. A topic is probably too broad if you can state it in four or five words

      How to narrow a topic.

    15. Few experi-enced researchers trust Wikipedia, so under no circumstances cite it as a source of evidence (unless your topic is Wikipedia itself).

      Lucky me! I can cite Wikipedia.

    16. Google your topic,

      Or use DuckDuckGo if you care about your privacy.

    17. Once you have a list of topics, choose the one or two that inter-est you most and explore their research potential. Do this:

      Choose one or two topics.

    18. Start by listing as many interests as you can that you'd like to explore.

      Make a list

    19. But also ask yourself: What interests me about this tapie? What would interest others?

      I should answer this questions.

    20. Some questions raise problems; others do not.

      Question and problems are not the same.

    21. But other questions may intrigue only the researcher:

      Write an interesting question is key.

    22. A subject is a broad área of knowledge (e.g., climate change), while a topic is a specific interest within that área (e.g., the effect of climate change on migratory birds).

      The hierarchy is:

      • Subject
        • Topic
    23. As you begin a research project, you will want to distinguish a topic from a sub-ject.

      There is a difference between topic and subject.

    24. From Topics to Questions

      Lectura de Research Design in Social Sciences (GH)

    1. All of your main points are contained in the body, and normally this section is prepared well before you ever write the introduction or conclusion. The body of your speech will consume the largest amount of time to present; and it is the opportunity for you to elaborate on facts, evidence, examples, and opinions that support your thesis statement and do the work you have outlined in the specific purpose statement.

      Researching the topic is necessary before writing the body of the speech since you may be unaware of the most critical points.

  4. Sep 2019
    1. Shonda

      We must check online content for its accuracy and where it originated. The Internet is filled with inaccuracies and biased opinions. A public speaker must validate that the information used in a speech is true and be aware of opposing views that may invalidate a chosen source.

    1. Estimating the Effect of Asking About Citizenship on the U.S. Census March 21, 2019, 1:21 pm

      This is a really interesting article in so many ways; it speaks to a larger political issue of our time, it uses an innovative method (an experiment!), and it follows a very generic and general structure of a social science research paper. Think of this as an ideal or prototype of social science research.

    2. Research Design

      Research design is all about telling others what the researchers actually did to answer the RQ(s) they proposed earlier.

      It has to be explicit (and detailed enough), so others could replicate this research (i.e., do the same things/ follow the same procedure).

      ***Do you think this research design section is explicit enough? Would you be able to replicate their research if you wanted?

      Please identify the control and treatment group (with the independent variable) in this research, and describe it briefly why you think so. ***

  5. Aug 2019
    1. ce. We conclude with a discussion of directions for future research aimed at incorporating comments in the content design pro-cess and for enhancing the user’s experience via new design features in commenting platforms.

      changes in the interface itself could transform the situation

    1. Moreover, annotation is the agreed upon means of starting and sustaining that conversation.

      With this text appearing on bookbook.pubpub.org being an excellent example of just this. #meta

      I'm sort of hoping for some discussion of Kathleen Fitzpatrick's process behind her book Planned Obsolescence which was released in draft form for open peer review in fall 2009, much like Annotations. It's the first example I can think of a scholar doing something like this digitally in public, though there may have been other earlier examples.

    1. computational techniques can improve upon and enhance existingapproaches, providing more efficient ways of identifying some typesof anomalies and providing a historical picture of the evolution oflanguage and activity over time

      mixed methods are necessary in the digital age

  6. Jul 2019
    1. Current theories on aging suggest that changes in heterochromatin may be responsible for age-related changes in gene expression and alterations in H3K9me3 may function as a driver of aging

      As largre as the implications of this statement are, it has not been said as explicitly as this. research connections. Implied connections through thePPAR and seeking a new involvement of the Circular RNA as a super-gene family. Possible already reference. Aziz Sancar should be the one to tie circular RNA to Circadian.

    1. One reason for this is publication bias: journal editors, reviewers and authors can favour positive, sometimes eye-catching results over negative findings. But negative results waste research funds and researchers’ time if they do not reach the research community through publication, and, in the case of clinical studies, can lead to fruitless patient involvement.

      This particular issue has been highlighted by various people from time to time. No one however seems to take a note of it. I still meet people who keep saying their article was not accepted because it contained negative results.

    1. The scientists were astonished by the results: selective noradrenaline release re-wired the connectivity patterns between different brain regions in a way that was extremely similar to the changes observed in humans exposed to acute stress. Networks that process sensory stimuli, such as the visual and auditory center of the brain, exhibited the strongest increase in activity. A similar rise in activity was observed in the amygdala network, which is associated with states of anxiety.
  7. May 2019
    1. Schools can ensure their curriculum are up to date and training students for the areas of science with the most potential for advancement

      This completely flies in the face of the need for more basic science research which is far more likely to create vast potential advancement rather than focusing on smaller edge cases.

    2. Funding organizations like universities and foundations can get in touch with authors to back their future work, or spot trends of where breakthroughs are being made so they can funnel resources correctly

      Essentially GoFundMe or Patreon for the science set! This is nearly laughable and unlikely to really happen.

      Maybe VC culture can invade science research and screw that up too!

    1. People are rewarded for being productive rather than being right, for building ever upward instead of checking the foundations. These incentives allow weak studies to be published. And once enough have amassed, they create a collective perception of strength that can be hard to pierce.

      We desperately need to fix these foundations of science to focus on solid foundations and reproducibility...

    2. When geneticists finally gained the power to cost-efficiently analyze entire genomes, they realized that most disorders and diseases are influenced by thousands of genes, each of which has a tiny effect. To reliably detect these miniscule effects, you need to compare hundreds of thousands of volunteers. By contrast, the candidate-gene studies of the 2000s looked at an average of 345 people!

      I'm hoping that more researchers are contemplating this as they stroll merrily along their way this week.

    3. It’s as if they’d been “describing the life cycle of unicorns, what unicorns eat, all the different subspecies of unicorn, which cuts of unicorn meat are tastiest, and a blow-by-blow account of a wrestling match between unicorns and Bigfoot,” Alexander wrote.
    4. “How on Earth could we have spent 20 years and hundreds of millions of dollars studying pure noise?”
  8. Apr 2019
    1. Faculty members are increasingly interested in open access publication models. Approximately 64%

      Growing dissatisfaction with a subscription-based publication model with "scholarly research outputs" freely available to public.

    1. stressful but fascinating

      It seems like these two words sum up this last week pretty well for a majority of the group. There has been a lot of information to take in, within a short amount of time. Although it has been a bit on the chaotic side here and there, most of the class can agree that the more we see, the more fascinating it becomes. I think everyone is looking forward to attaining more clarity for the program as a whole. The enthusiasm is contagious. It seems the whole process is new for everyone, and everyone is excited for the adventure.

    1. While I would say that Alexander L. George and Andrew Bennett’s book “Case Studies and Theory Development in the Social Sciences“, is neither a new book nor an old one (it was published in 2004), it is definitely a classic and a must-read. Moreover, I’m a comparativist, and someone who undertakes systematic case study comparisons, so George and Bennett’s book is definitely my go-to when I want to revise my research strategy.
    1. But thirdly, and most valuably, the template gives you a big space at the bottom to write sentences that summarise the page.  That is, you start writing your critical response on the notes themselves.

      I do much this same thing, however, I'm typically doing it using Hypothes.is to annotate and highlight. These pieces go back to my own website where I can keep, categorize, and even later search them. If I like, I'll often do these sorts of summaries on related posts themselves (usually before I post them publicly if that's something I'm planning on doing for a particular piece.)

  9. Mar 2019
  10. fldit-www.cs.uni-dortmund.de fldit-www.cs.uni-dortmund.de
    1. Eine beliebte Klassifizierung dynamischer Eigenschaften liefert die Unterscheidung inSicherheitsbedin-gungen(safety conditions) auf der eine Seite undLebendigkeitsbedingungen(liveness conditions) auf deranderen Seite. Nach [14], S. 94, schließt eine Sicherheitsbedingung das Auftreten von etwas Schlechtem aus, wäh-rend eine Lebendigkeitsbedingung das Auftreten von etwas Gutem garantiert. E
    1. This aspect has led some to claim practitioner research shares many qualities of social movements (e.g., Campano, 2009; Cochran-Smith & Lytle, 2009).
    1. Svante Arrhenius in 1896. His paper, published in the Philosophical Magazine and Journal of Science, was the first to quantify the contribution of carbon dioxide to what scientists now call the "greenhouse effect."

      Beginning of research into greenhouse gasses, global warming and CO2 emissions.

    1. What's possible with personalized learning: an overview of personalized learning for schools, families, and communities. This 32 page PDF is included in part due to its credibility and also to its breadth. The focus is personalized learning in schools. All ages are considered and there is a discussion of 'what personalized learning means for teachers.' It is sufficiently readable and rather attractively presented for a report. rating 5/5

    1. A national landscape scan of personalized learning in K-12 education in the United States This is included because it is associated with the Bill and Melinda Gates foundation, among other indicators of credibility, and because it provides (as the title suggests) a portrait of the state of personalized learning in schools, addressing topics that are not addressed by other resources in this list. rating 5/5

    1. This online journal article is a reflective piece about mobile learning for teachers. It appears to be connected to the work of Argyris and Schon (reflection in action) and it appears that they argue that adoption of mobile learning for teachers is not occurring at a fast pace. While disappointing, the article appears useful. rating 5/5

    1. This is a research based report (of which I have found few) that connects professional development and personalized learning. I had hoped to find links that applied to health care and have not found a great many so far, but this article, which is more oriented toward professional development for teachers, still has applications since public health education professionals participate in many of the same practices. rating; 5/5

    1. This link is for the Association of Information Science and Technology. While many of the resources are available only to those who are association members, there are a great many resources to be found via this site. Among the items available are their newsletter and their journal articles. As the title suggests, there is a technology focus, and also a focus on scientific findings that can guide instructional designers in the presentation and display of visual and textual information, often but not exclusively online. Instructional designers are specifically addressed via the content of this site. A student membership is available. Rating 5/5

    1. The more recent the research is, the better—or at least, more relevant—it’s assumed to be.

      The more recent the better

    1. Data journalism produced by two of the nation’s most prestigious news organizations — The New York Times and The Washington Post — has lacked transparency, often failing to explain the methods journalists or others used to collect or analyze the data on which the articles were based, a new study finds. In addition, the news outlets usually did not provide the public with access to that data

      While this is a worthwhile topic, I would like to see more exploration of data journalism in the 99.99999 percent of news organizations that are NOT the New York Times or the Washington Post and don't have the resources to publish so many data stories despite the desperate need for them across the nation. Also, why no digital news outlets included?

    2. Worse yet, it wouldn’t surprise me if we saw more unethical people publish data as a strategic communication tool, because they know people tend to believe numbers more than personal stories. That’s why it’s so important to have that training on information literacy and methodology.”

      Like the way unethical people use statistics in general? This should be a concern, especially as government data, long considered the gold standard of data, undergoes attacks that would skew the data toward political ends. (see the census 2020)

  11. Feb 2019
    1. However, when asked if they would be willing to participate in action research teaming in the future, preservice teacher candidates were more positive (x̄=6.4)<math><mtext>(</mtext><mtext>x</mtext><mtext>̄</mtext><mtext>=6.4)</mtext></math> than their veteran counterparts (x̄=5.8)<math><mtext>(</mtext><mtext>x</mtext><mtext>̄</mtext><mtext>=5.8)</mtext></math>.

      Maybe it's that the preservice teachers are more overwhelmed with learning to teach and they aren't a full staff member in the cooperating district, so potential impact (perception) is decreased.

    2. One way to overcome this isolation is to encourage collaboration with informed peers through established frameworks within school communities.

      Perhaps restructuring traditional PD to be more longitudinal can help. But, how do I manage so many different teams?

    1. Having the expertise and context of the entire team in the room – the product designer, product manager and the engineers – means the plans are holistic and viable rather than limited to the lens of one of the roles
    2. This method allows us to learn before shipping and make sure that we can be more responsible with the design decisions we make

      Fail fast, fail often?

      This feels much more sustainable without becoming laborious.

    3. The matrix reduces the role of bias while giving space for other findings to emerge
    4. Focusses on what the user does, not what they say or think
    5. User research is about reducing uncertainty in the design process
    1. Another way of thinking about a good metric is to define a bad one. Bad metrics include those that are:

      A really nice list to check your metrics against

    1. Research methodologies and methods used must be open for full discussion and review by peers and stakeholders.

      So does this mean totally open? As in publish your protocols open?

    2. to report findings openly and accurately, this includes in particular (where feasible and appropriate) to report findings back to the participants and communities who have engaged in the work, in a form and in language that is useful and accessible for the participants and partners involved;

      this seems to be the minimum - how can you take this further? What about community benefit agreements?

    1. These discussions can be fraught with power dynamics, resulting in controversial issues appearing unbalanced as more powerful authors block alternative viewpoints.

      Students need to know which information is going to be unbiased and true. There are MANY internet sources that use shock value information or biased information rather than presenting corect information.

    1. Creating mental and physical representations of digital content focused on accessibility and approachability

      Creating visual representations to understand the content being researched.

  12. Jan 2019
    1. No, I started the research, read a little bit about algorithmic trading in looking at different strategies, but I have not developed anything. Just just been researching, reading more about how people do..what Indicators, you know, people are using. Although most of the research I've been doing and one of the books I read was on the equities or algorithms, but they're all based technically so you can interchange markets within them. You just have to tweak whatever your strategy is to match what, what particular market

      talking about algorithms

    2. So it's not to say I don't read them, but it's not necessarily something that I trade on some other guy's opinion.
    3. Basically, I will definitely take a look at the total market cast, um, and the alt coin market cap. So I go to queen signals.trade, which is a neat little tool. And uh, they basically pull data from coin market cap. So I think it's the only site I know of where you can look at the total market cap.
    4. I would say definitely try as much as possible now not to care about the headlines and just not caring at all. Only care about
    5. But also up there is a horizontal support resistance lines. So that's huge for me. Um, classical charting patterns, you know, you're a rising ledge, falling with head and shoulders, et Cetera, are huge.
    6. Twitter is my go to and people post a news articles from like ccn from what does it coined, ask a bunch of these crypto news things and they're great. Uh, you know, I take them with a grain of salt because whatever, there's a lot of like fake news.
    7. Yeah, I mean I get a daily email to my email called, what is it called? It's, I think it's called the unbanked you NBA Ntd and yeah, it is. And basically it's just like a rundown of like daily crypto news and I just kind of scroll through and just quickly if there's anything important I'll just dig deeper, but I just got a quick cursory overview of market news
    8. Uh, sure. So in simple terms, I focus on following a three steps. It's just planning, acting, and reviewing. So the first step is actually going through analyzing a potential trade or figuring out how the overall market is, I guess before I even look at doing individualized trades specific to crypto. So that's going to involve looking at trading view to see how charts look from a weekly down to an hourly basis. And then I'm going to be looking at daily volume levels for Bitcoin to start. And then if I'm looking at other cryptocurrencies, then I'll start to look at their volume as well to see if there's activity, if there's buying interest or selling interest in a specific asset, um, to just make sure the liquidity meets, um, my thresholds for wanting to get into a trade. Then once of use various tools to basically identify a potential trade, then I will basically figure out what the risk to reward is going to be for that trade.
    9. As far as like finding out informationon where like bitcoin or ethereum or anything like that, it's going, oh, I'll look at dates ahead of time to understand how some sort of effect it in the
    10. So that's going to involve looking at trading view to see how charts look from a weekly down to an hourly basis.
    11. planning, acting, and reviewing.
    1. As teachers gained familiarity and agency, they moved from perceiving ‘research’ as a domain that existed outside the classroom, to doing research and seeing where it fits with classroom practice.

      Is the term "action research" a barrier for teachers to engage?

    2. In our research program overall, we have observed the success of teacher teams who follow a cyclical structure of co-planning/ co-teaching/ implementation/ debriefing with enactments (practice) in between team meetings, and so we expected to see this pattern repeat itself (and it did).

      This would be a great use of time for the ambassador program next year.

    3. This discussion informed the development of a problem statement (a brief statement encapsulating the problem under focus in the classroom) and corresponding research question.

      Is there a way to do this in smaller chunks of time? The time commitment to group meetings may dissuade potential participants. How can the researcher help identify and define a problem for teachers to look at?

    4. The most important factor was that at least some visual evidence of classroom practice and student work was shared in team meetings, which allowed team members to literally see what was happening in one another’s classrooms.

      "If you can't see it, it isn't happening."

      Finding time to see these practices is hard. The researcher (or facilitator) can play part of that role in documenting sessions for the group as a whole. Asking teachers to identify examples can also promote observational skills when trying to gather data.

    5. they realized that they would be supported rather than judged and that team members would help to find answers

      The Instruction rounds format would be great for building this trust and teach valid observation techniques.

    6. Teachers saw each other as mutually supportive.

      Building this relationship takes time. Departments support one another, but for collaborative, systemic work, we need to break out of department silos and consider common cross-curricular methods.

    1. Deletes the item in the ith position

      ? Different from pop(i) how? both delete? NOTE: read more about syntax elsewhere

    2. Modifies a list to be sorted

      ? Like modifies to be sorted, like what does that mean? Sorts it? by what criteria?

    3. Note that when two integers are divided, the result is a floating point.

      note: check up what a floating point exactly means Googled : How floating-point numbers work The idea is to compose a number of two main parts:

      A significand that contains the number’s digits. Negative significands represent negative numbers. An exponent that says where the decimal (or binary) point is placed relative to the beginning of the significand. Negative exponents represent numbers that are very small (i.e. close to zero).

    1. Validations provided bySPLEmmainclude structural veri- cations onfms and mappings (YourCastde nes a meta-model for the de nition of relationships) as well as correctconstruction ofContributions. As the previous evolutions in-volvefmchanges, we use generic preconditions related tofmconsistency
    1. Opening the Textbook: Open Education Resources in U.S. Higher Education, 2017

      great collection of reports from babson

  13. Dec 2018
    1. A political cartoon can be better understood if we know the offices of state that the individuals held at the time of the cartoon, and here is where it helps to combine artwork data and political data on the same platform.
  14. www.lexisnexis.com www.lexisnexis.com
    1. Shepardizing®The process of consulting Shepard's®to see if a case has been overturned, reaffirmed, questioned, or cited by later cases

      WTF is Shepardizing a registered trademark its a f***ing verb

    2. Primary SourcesA document that establishes the law on a particular issue, such as a case decision or legislative act
    3. Secondary Sources:Sources of information that describe or interpret the law, such as legal treatises, law review articles, and other scholarly legal writings, cited by lawyers to persuade a court to reach a particular decision in a case, but which the court is not obligated to follow
    1. At pre-test, the control group showed relatively high scores on all quality measures. The mean score for function-based was 0.84, evidence-based was 0.84, and non-punishment-based was 0.96. The treatment group showed slightlylower pre-test scores in the areas of function-based (mean = 0.78) and evidence-based (mean = 0.78) and similar scoreson non-punishment-based (mean = 0.96)

      ceiling effect for control group

    1. Eastbourne and Hastings

      This article talks about the context of the seaside (and various seaside resorts) in Austen's writing:

      https://www.regencyhistory.net/2012/09/jane-austen-and-seaside.html

    2. toast rack
    3. My sisters think me bilious

      "Bilious"= an excess of bile that comes from Hippocrates' theory of the four humours (melancholic, phlegmatic, sanguine, and choleric). http://www.oed.com/view/Entry/18971?redirectedFrom=bilious#eid

  15. Nov 2018
    1. In the academic setting especially, a premium will beplaced on clinical quality improvement, the develop-ment of practice guidelines, and outcomes research,not only to provide the physician with a creative out-let and a potential source of funding during thenonclinical months but also to give the academiccenter a practical research-and-development arm
    1. Thinking in Multimedia: Research-Based Tips on Designing and Using Interactive Multimedia Curricula.

      This article examines various methods of delivery: multimedia integration, possibly including audio, video, slides, and animation. The recommendation is to carefully consider which online delivery mode matches with the learner, and to be cognizant that not everyone learns in the same manner. Certain topics may be best presented in live videos and not in power-point slides show as meaning may be lost or not delivered correctly. It’s important to follow-up with immediate assessment and feedback to continue to develop effective training.

      RATING: 5/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. Instructional Design Strategies for Intensive Online Courses: An Objectivist-Constructivist Blended Approach

      This was an excellent article Chen (2007) in defining and laying out how a blended learning approach of objectivist and constructivist instructional strategies work well in online instruction and the use of an actual online course as a study example.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. SurveyMonkey

      SurveyMonkey is a FREE survey platform that allows for the collection of responses from targeted individuals that can be easily collected and used to create reports and quantify results. SurveyMonkey can be delivered via email, mobile, chat, web and social media. The platform is easy to use and can be used as an add on for large CRMs such as Salesforce. There are over 100 templates and the ability to develop customized templates to suit your needs. www.surveymonkey.com

      RATING: 5/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

  16. create-center.ahs.illinois.edu create-center.ahs.illinois.edu
    1. CREATE Overview

      Create is a non-profit organization dedicated to providing resources for the development and creation of educational technology to enhance the independence and productivity of older adult learners.

      The sight includes publications, resources, research, news, social media and information all relevant to aging and technology. It is the consortium of five universities including: Weill Cornell Medicine,University of Miami, Florida State University,Georgia Institute of Technology, and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

    1. Distance Education Trends: Integrating new technologies to foster student interaction and collaboration

      This article explores the interaction of student based learner-centered used of technology tools such as wikis, blogs and podcasts as new and emerging technology tools. With distance learning programs becoming more and more popular, software applications such as Writeboard, InstaCol and Imeem may become less of the software of choice. The article looks closely at the influence of technology and outcomes.

      RATING: 4/5 (rating based upon a score system 1 to 5, 1= lowest 5=highest in terms of content, veracity, easiness of use etc.)

  17. Oct 2018
  18. www.projectinfolit.org www.projectinfolit.org
    1. Major Findings (2:35 minutes)

      I'm quite taken with the variety of means this study is using to communicate its findings. There are blogposts, tweets/social posts, a website, executive summaries, the full paper, and even a short video! I wish more studies went to these lengths.

    1. OER is an equity strategy for higher education: providing all students with access to course materials on the first day of class serves to level the academic playing field in course settings

      OER and equity