39 Matching Annotations
  1. Jul 2020
    1. The most controversial crime-related posts get the most engagement. In turn, these posts are featured the most in users’ notifications because the algorithm knows those posts attract lots of likes, comments, and clicks.

      I wonder if this also increases the availability heuristic implicit and makes people think there is more crime in their neighborhood than there actually is?

  2. Jun 2020
  3. Apr 2020
    1. While these particular indictments refer to credit card data, the laws do also reference authentication features. Two of the key points here are knowingly and with intent to defraud.
    2. I could have released this data anonymously like everyone else does but why should I have to? I clearly have no criminal intent here. It is beyond all reason that any researcher, student, or journalist have to be afraid of law enforcement agencies that are supposed to be protecting us instead of trying to find ways to use the laws against us.
    3. For now the laws are on my side because there has to be intent to commit or facilitate a crime
  4. Feb 2020
    1. (Återkommande forskning visar att 85-90 procent av tonårskillar begår brott. Allt från snatteri upp till rån och mord. Och det oavsett om de har invandrarbakgrund eller inte. Cirka 97-98 procent av de här killarna blir sedan skötsamma arbetande vuxna medborgare – som beklagar sig över ungdomsbrottsligheten.)
  5. Jan 2020
    1. By some estimates, more than 50,000 pieces of artwork are stolen each year, amounting to annual losses of around $6 to $8 billion globally. This makes art theft one of the most valuable criminal enterprises around, exceeded only by drug trafficking and arms dealing.

      Art crime is even more serious than we think

  6. Dec 2019
  7. Jul 2019
    1. According to Shoshana Zuboff, professor emerita at Harvard Business School, the Cambridge Analytica scandal was a landmark moment, because it revealed a micro version “of the larger phenomenon that is surveillance capitalism”. Zuboff is responsible for formulating the concept of surveillance capitalism, and published a magisterial, indispensible book with that title soon after the scandal broke. In the book, Zuboff creates a framework and a language for understanding this new world. She believes The Great Hack is an important landmark in terms of public understanding, and that Noujaim and Amer capture “what living under the conditions of surveillance capitalism means. That every action is being repurposed as raw material for behavioural data. And that these data are being lifted from our lives in ways that are systematically engineered to be invisible. And therefore we can never resist.”

      Shoshana Zuboff's comments on The Great Hack.

    1. A new study published this year in the American Psychologist finds that this well-established bystander effect may largely be a myth. The study uses footage of more than 200 incidents from surveillance cameras in Amsterdam; Cape Town; and Lancaster, England.

      The study suggests that people are willing to self-police to protect their communities and others.

    2. It’s one of the most enduring urban myths of all: If you get in trouble, don’t count on anyone nearby to help. Research dating back to the late 1960s documents how the great majority of people who witness crimes or violent behavior refuse to intervene.
  8. Jun 2019
    1. P.B

      a young Native was denied marriage to a "squaw", who was instead "given" to a "half-breed" - the Native shot the half-breed, escaped custody and is at large

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  9. May 2019
    1. Unsurprisingly living up to its reputation, Facebook refuses to comply with my GDPR Subject Access Requests in an appropriate manner.

      Facebook never has cared about privacy of individuals. This is highly interesting.

  10. Apr 2019
    1. In a new article, the New York Times details a little-known technique increasingly used by law enforcement to figure out everyone who might have been within certain geographic areas during specific time periods in the past. The technique relies on detailed location data collected by Google from most Android devices as well as iPhones and iPads that have Google Maps and other apps installed. This data resides in a Google-maintained database called “Sensorvault,” and because Google stores this data indefinitely, Sensorvault “includes detailed location records involving at least hundreds of millions of devices worldwide and dating back nearly a decade.”

      Google is passing on location data to law enforcement without letting users know.

    1. “Prison labor” is usually associated with physical work, but inmates at two prisons in Finland are doing a new type of labor: classifying data to train artificial intelligence algorithms for a startup. Though the startup in question, Vainu, sees the partnership as a kind of prison reform that teaches valuable skills, other experts say it plays into the exploitative economics of prisoners being required to work for very low wages.

      Naturally, this is exploitative; the inmates do not learn a skill that they can take out into the real world.

      I'd be surprised if they'd not have to sign a NDA for this.

  11. Aug 2018
  12. May 2018
  13. Aug 2017
  14. Jul 2017
  15. Oct 2016
    1. we are more likely to be killed by law enforcement than any other group

      This article seems to be the source of this statistic. As they note, it's a hard number to come by because the crime is neither well-covered in the media nor well-reported by the authorities. Regardless, though, given the centuries-long and wildly painful indigenous struggle in the US, this certainly deserves our attention.

  16. Feb 2014
    1. killed Candaules as he slept. Thus he made himself master of the king's wife and sovereignty

      Hdt. 1.12 Gyges took the city and Candaules's wife for assassinating him; not a crime.

  17. Oct 2013
    1. the better sort of man will be just without being forced to be so, and the written laws depend on force while the unwritten ones do not

      Can a person, like in the above scenario, actually be forced to be just? Who determines what's equal, what's fair when it's not a black-and-white situation ("failing to do them good")?

    2. the crime is worse which breaks the written laws

      Whole point.

  18. Sep 2013
    1. The worse of two acts of wrong done to others is that which is prompted by the worse disposition.

      So it's not the crime committed, but the state-of-mind that produced the crime?