284 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2022
    1. Hanf kann in der gleichen Zeit direkt so viel CO2 absorbieren wie Bäume und andere Pflanzen. Deshalb könnte er eine Schlüsselrolle in eine regenerativen Landwirtschaft haben. Um CO2 dauerhaft zu speichern, müssen aus den Pflanzen Baumaterialien und andere industrielle Rohstoffe hergestellt werden.

      University of York and Biorenewables Development Centre

  2. Oct 2022
    1. The information ecosystem is broken. Our political conversations are happening on infrastructure—Facebook, YouTube, Twitter—built for viral advertising. The velocity of social sharing, the power of recommendation algorithms, the scale of social networks, and the accessibility of media manipulation technology has created an environment where pseudo events, half-truths, and outright fabrications thrive. Edward Murrow has been usurped by Alex Jones.

      I believe the variable of lies and misinformation thriving in virality is based on the idea that negativity is more engaging and intriguing than positivity. When something stimulates a negative feeling such as fear or anxiety, people engage because they feel insecure whether it be relative to the condition of their environment or internal self-perception. For example, if you read something negative about the President, you care because you live in the United States and relate it to your own well-being. Further, if someone read negative articles about a person they envy, they may feel inclined to engage & share it because that person's success made them feel inferior. Unfortunately, negativity sells.

  3. Aug 2022
    1. The person who has acquired knowledge of a language has internalized asystem of rules that relate sound and meaning in a particular way.
    1. Perspectiae and continuity. Correct perspective is es-sential t o sound critical malysis and interpretation. Thehistorical writer must always keep the time element clearlyin mind, and must recognize that an estimate of any histori-cal ersonage or event is determined in no small measureby t1e time or the conditions under which the person livedor the event occurred
    1. Stigmergy (/ˈstɪɡmərdʒi/ STIG-mər-jee) is a mechanism of indirect coordination, through the environment, between agents or actions.

      Example: ant pheromone paths

      Within ants, there can be a path left for others to follow, but what about natural paths in our environment that influence us to take them because of the idea of the "path of least resistence" or the effects of having paved cow paths.

      Similarly being lead by "the company that you keep".

      relathionship to research on hanging out with fat people tending to make one fatter.

  4. www.janeausten.pludhlab.org www.janeausten.pludhlab.org
    1. autumnal months in the country

      Another link to Fanny Price who also enjoys seeing the seasons pass in the country

  5. Jul 2022
  6. bafybeicyqgzvzf7g3zprvxebvbh6b4zpti5i2m2flbh4eavtpugiffo5re.ipfs.dweb.link bafybeicyqgzvzf7g3zprvxebvbh6b4zpti5i2m2flbh4eavtpugiffo5re.ipfs.dweb.link
    1. From my own perspective, the conclusion is important that human structural development issubject to a categorical double bond: On the one hand, a person’s lifeworld is his or her ownsubjective construction. On the other hand, this construction is not arbitrary. In spite of allsubjectivity – because of the human’s structural coupling to its environment, this constructionis influenced and limited by the framework of this very environment (Kraus, 2013, p. 65ff.).

      !- in other words : lifeworld and life conditions, constructed and discoverable reality * We construct our lifeworld with our umwelt * https://hyp.is/go?url=http%3A%2F%2Fdocdrop.org%2Fvideo%2FG_0jJfliUvQ%2F&group=world * Each human senses the environment in a way unique to our species * Our personal evolution as an individual also causes us to treat unique aspects of the environment with higher salience than other aspects, forming our unique salience landscape * Yet, structural coupling constrains us to the laws of behavior of the environment * Hence, there is always a constructed part of our experience of reality and a non-constructed, discoverable part consisting of repeatable patterns of nature, culturally consolidated in human laws of nature

  7. Jun 2022
  8. May 2022
    1. bash $ curl -H 'Accept: application/ld+json' 'https://scigraph.springernature.com/pub.10.1007/978-0-387-89976-3_10' { "@context": "https://springernature.github.io/scigraph/jsonld/sgcontext.json", "about": [ { "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/08", "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", "name": "Information and Computing Sciences", "type": "DefinedTerm" }, { "id": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/0806", "inDefinedTermSet": "http://purl.org/au-research/vocabulary/anzsrc-for/2008/", "name": "Information Systems", "type": "DefinedTerm" } ], "author": [ { "affiliation": { "alternateName": "Counseling, Educational, Psychology, and Special Education Department, Michigan State University, 461 Erickson Hall, 48824-1034, East Lansing, MI, USA", "id": "http://www.grid.ac/institutes/grid.17088.36", "name": [ "Counseling, Educational, Psychology, and Special Education Department, Michigan State University, 461 Erickson Hall, 48824-1034, East Lansing, MI, USA" ], "type": "Organization" }, "familyName": "Reckase", "givenName": "Mark D.", "id": "sg:person.01166264366.27", "sameAs": [ "https://app.dimensions.ai/discover/publication?and_facet_researcher=ur.01166264366.27" ], "type": "Person" } ], "datePublished": "2009-05-22", "datePublishedReg": "2009-05-22", "description": "Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) is a methodology for constructing a test, administering it to an examinee, and scoring the test using interactive computer technology. This methodology has a history that is as long as that of interactive computing. An early summary of CAT methods is given in Weiss (1974). A detailed description of the development of an operational application for the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery is given in (Sands 1997). There are also several books available that describe the basic components of CAT procedures (Wainer, Dorans, Flaugher, Green, Mislevy, Steinberg and Thissen 1990; Parshall, Spray and Davey 2002; van der Linden and Glas 2000) so the basic details of the methodology are not presented here. A review of that literature will show that most of the current CAT methodology is based on the assumption that a unidimensional IRT model accurately represents the interaction between persons and test items. In this chapter, the generalization of the CAT methodology to the multidimensional case is considered. To provide a framework for this material, a brief summary of the conceptual basis for CAT is provided.", "genre": "chapter", "id": "sg:pub.10.1007/978-0-387-89976-3_10", "inLanguage": "en", "isAccessibleForFree": false, "isPartOf": { "isbn": [ "978-0-387-89975-6", "978-0-387-89976-3" ], "name": "Multidimensional Item Response Theory", "type": "Book" }, "keywords": [ "interactive computing", "computer technology", "interactive computer technology", "computerized adaptive testing", "Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery", "adaptive testing", "operational applications", "basic components", "computing", "unidimensional IRT model", "CAT methodology", "methodology", "test items", "IRT models", "CAT procedure", "technology", "basic details", "framework", "detailed description", "applications", "conceptual basis", "multidimensional case", "generalization", "testing", "examinees", "model", "items", "method", "description", "brief summary", "detail", "persons", "MIRT", "batteries", "test", "CAT method", "components", "assumption", "development", "chapter", "summary", "basis", "literature", "book", "procedure", "interaction", "Weiss", "cases", "review", "history", "materials", "Earlier summaries" ], "name": "Computerized Adaptive Testing Using MIRT", "pagination": "311-339", "productId": [ { "name": "dimensions_id", "type": "PropertyValue", "value": [ "pub.1046349288" ] }, { "name": "doi", "type": "PropertyValue", "value": [ "10.1007/978-0-387-89976-3_10" ] } ], "publisher": { "name": "Springer Nature", "type": "Organisation" }, "sameAs": [ "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-89976-3_10", "https://app.dimensions.ai/details/publication/pub.1046349288" ], "sdDataset": "chapters", "sdDatePublished": "2022-05-10T10:51", "sdLicense": "https://scigraph.springernature.com/explorer/license/", "sdPublisher": { "name": "Springer Nature - SN SciGraph project", "type": "Organization" }, "sdSource": "s3://com-springernature-scigraph/baseset/20220509/entities/gbq_results/chapter/chapter_412.jsonl", "type": "Chapter", "url": "https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-89976-3_10" }

    1. schema:ScholarlyArticle is used to describe journal articles; schema:Chapter is used to describe book chapters; schema:Book is used to describe books; schema:Periodical is used to describe journals; schema:Person is used to describe researchers (e.g. authors, editors, grant recipients) schema:MonetaryGrant is used to describe awarded research grants; schema:MedicalStudy is used to describe clinical trials; sgo:Patent is used to describe patents.

  9. Apr 2022
    1. ☠️ Duygu Uygun-Tunc ☠️. (2020, October 24). A bit cliché but ppl will always find it cooler to point out that a given proposal is not the only one/has shortcomings/is not the Truth itself etc. Than making or improving a proposal. I keep being reminded of this every single day, esp on twitter. [Tweet]. @uygun_tunc. https://twitter.com/uygun_tunc/status/1319923563248353281

  10. Feb 2022
    1. Consequently, vision is the most poorly developed sense at birth

      The vision of a new born is poor because of the environment of the dark womb making this a nature over nurture.

  11. blogs.baruch.cuny.edu blogs.baruch.cuny.edu
    1. nd wat

      "clay" elicits ideas of rebirth and reformation; a new shape, a new you.

      "wattle" as well--is symbolically laden with anatomy connotations, but also can be reference to twings, and other images of nature.

  12. Jan 2022
    1. more exact movements of the hands and fingers and include the ability to reach and grasp an object

      we are born with fingers that we can move... hence, nature??

    2. temperature

      It’s a natural affect on human development

    3. They can distinguish between their mother’s scent and that of others

      They can distinguish between their mother’s scent and that of others.

    4.  In fact, an infant can distinguish between very similar sounds as early as one month after birth and can distinguish between a familiar and non-familiar voice even earlier

      I think it is nature.

    5. By 9 months, an infant can also watch a moving object, reach for it as it approaches, and grab it

      This is an example of nature, this ability to grab is created because of the design of the human hand.

    6.  At about 4 months of age, the infant is able to reach for an object, first with both arms and within a few weeks, with only one arm. Grasping an object involves the use of the fingers and palm, but no thumbs.

      Nature

    7. Newborns have difficulty distinguishing between colors, but within a few months are able to distinguish between colors as well as adults

      This is nature because it is generally true of all infants regardless of environment.

    8. involve the use of large muscle groups

      well... we are born with it, hence part of our nature??

    9.  Infants who have experience crawling and exploring will pay greater attention to visual cues of depth and modify their actions accordingly

      Nature

    10. Newborns do not scan objects this way; rather, they tend to look at the chin or another less detailed part of the face.

      Nature

    11. At about 4 months of age, the infant is able to reach for an object, first with both arms and within a few weeks, with only one arm. 

      Infants at this period of time develop this skill months after they are born to make precise movements with their body, such as reaching for objects.

    12. he womb is a dark environment void of visual stimulation. Consequently, vision is the most poorly developed sense at birth. 

      Nature

    13. this ability to hear is evidenced as soon as the 5th month of prenatal development

      This development is in your genes.

    14. In fact, an infant can distinguish between very similar sounds as early as one month after birth and can distinguish between a familiar and non-familiar voice even earlier.

      unless there is a genetic abnormality this would be the same for all babies

    15. Grasping an object involves the use of the fingers and palm, but no thumbs

      Based on design of the human hand.

    16. At about 4 months of age, the infant is able to reach for an object

      This is a sign of nature as a child is developing they can start to use more of their small muscle groups to grasp things

    17. Newborns do not scan objects this way; rather, they tend to look at the chin or another less detailed part of the face. However, by 2 or 3 months, they will seek more detail when visually exploring an object and begin showing preferences for unusual images over familiar ones, for patterns over solids, faces over patterns, and three-dimensional objects over flat images.

      Seems to be Nature to me.

    18. can distinguish between a familiar and non-familiar voice even earlier
    19. Consequently, vision is the most poorly developed sense at birth. 

      Genetics = nature

    20. binocular vision develops at about 2 months of age

      depth perception 2 months old

    21. These skills begin to develop first. Examples include moving to bring the chin up when lying on the stomach, moving the chest up, rocking back and forth on hands and knees. But it also includes exploring an object with one’s feet as many babies do, as early as 8 weeks of age, if seated in a carrier or other device that frees the hips.

      nature

    22. Newborns typically cannot see further than 8 to 16 inches away from their faces, have difficulty keeping a moving object within their gaze, and can detect contrast more than color differences

      I hope this is considered "nature"

    23. Even on the first day of life, infants orient to their mother’s odor and are soothed, when crying, by their mother’s odor
    24. (the pincer grasp

      This is nature because no one has to show you you can move like that, you discover it whatever culture you were born in

    25. Newborns have difficulty distinguishing between colors, but within a few months are able to distinguish between colors as well as adults

      colors coming into vision

    26. When the infants heard their mother’s voice, they sucked more strongly at the pacifier

      nature

    27. They can distinguish between their mother’s scent and that of others

      nature

    28. Newborns have difficulty distinguishing between colors,

      nature

    29. sense of touch is acute in infants and is essential to a baby’s growth of physical abilities, language and cognitive skills, and socio-emotional competency.

      Nature

    30. vision is the most poorly developed sense at birth

      Nature

    31.  Consequently, vision is the most poorly developed sense at birth.

      nature

    32. moving to bring the chin up when lying on the stomach

      Nature

    33. ?

      nature

    34. reach and grasp an object

      Nature

    35. bring the chin up when lying on the stomach,

      "Gross motor skills are voluntary movements that involve the use of large muscle groups."

    36. touch and temperature,

      happens to every newborn; the sensitive part

    37. show a preference for sweet flavors

      How did they find this out?

    38. Consequently, vision is the most poorly developed sense at birth. Newborns typically cannot see further than 8 to 16 inches away from their faces, have difficulty keeping a moving object within their gaze, and can detect contrast more than color differences.

      example of nature, unless their is an abnormality, this is how all babies begin to see 8-16 inches away from their faces

    39. exploring an object with one’s feet as many babies do,

      babies do this anywhere in the world, it is just a regular baby thing

    40. Immediately after birth, a newborn is sensitive to touch and temperature, and is also sensitive to pain, responding with crying and cardiovascular responses.

      Since this happens as soon as a baby is born, it has to be nature since nothing is influencing it's reaction into the world except for the biological makeup of the child.

    41. moving to bring the chin up when lying on the stomach

      I would classify this as nature

    42. Consequently, vision is the most poorly developed sense at birth.

      Vision being poor at birth is innate and not based on external factors

    1. The nature of technical writing is explained in "The nature of technical writing". Technical communication is something we do every day without even noticing. Having strong communication skills is beneficial in all areas of one's life, from personal to professional. From a business standpoint, communication is key to every transaction. Communicating effectively allows others and yourself to understand information at a faster and more accurate rate. A lack of communication skills leads to frequent misunderstandings and frustration.

    2. Technical communication/writing is something that has been around for a very long time. The earliest examples belong to Aristotle and his dictionary of "philosophical terms" and his summary of the "Doctrines of Pythagoras". World War I is considered the "Golden Age" of technical writing due to advances in medicine and aerospace.

    1. Different people have different responses to technology, even on the same platform. Scholars call this phenomenon “differential susceptibility” to media effects among a subgroup of people, and it holds equally for the differential well-being and mental health impacts of social media on young adults.

      Differential susceptibility is a technical term used to describe the ways that different people and different groups have different responses to technology even on the same platform. Similar versions of it can be applied to other areas outside of technology, which is but one target. Other areas include differential well-being and mental health.


      It could also be applied to drug addiction as some are more susceptible to becoming addicted to nicotine than others. Which parts of this might be nature, nurture, culture, etc.

    1. With regret and second thoughts, they were finally compelled to admit that the order of knowledge does not necessarily mirror the order of nature.

      I'll need some more research into this idea.


      Early modern scholars were forced to admit that the order of knowledge doesn't mirror the order of nature.

    Tags

    Annotators

    1. it’s people with natural immunity.

      Appeal to nature: Assuming that having "natural" immunity is better than having immunity from a vaccine.

      According to Hopkins Medicine "New studies show that natural immunity to the coronavirus weakens (wanes) over time,".

  13. Nov 2021
    1. This week they added two more domains – sci-hub.ru and scihub.unblockit.kim.

      Wiley, Elsevier, and Springer Nature are expanding the use of domain blocking to prevent people from accessing services like Sci-Hub.

    1. e spoke, and the river stayed his current, stopped the waves breaking,and made all quiet in front of him and let him get safelyinto the outlet of the river.

      An example of a figure calming waters in myth.

      cross reference: Moses and the parting of the Red Sea

      To what dates might we attribute these two texts? Which preceded the other? What sort of potential cultural influences would the original had on the subsequent?

      Also cross reference the many deluge/flood stories in ancient literatures including Genesis 6-9, The Epic of Gilgamesh, etc.

  14. Oct 2021
  15. Sep 2021
    1. Continual engagement with the mental rigors of modern life coincided in many parts of the world with improving nutrition, rising living conditions and reduced exposure to pathogens. These factors produced a century-long climb in average I.Q. scores — a phenomenon known as the Flynn effect, after James Flynn, the political philosopher who identified it.

      The Flynn effect is the substantial and sustained increase in intelligence test scores over most of the twentieth century.

      Research seems to indicate that the effect is environmentally caused: https://www.pnas.org/content/115/26/6674

    1. Schools don’t teach students how to restore their depleted attention with exposure to nature and the outdoors, or how to arrange their study spaces so that they extend intelligent thought.

      I'm reminded of Lynne Kelly's use of Indigenous Australian memory techniques which do both of these things at the same time: https://www.lynnekelly.com.au/?p=4794

    2. Brains don’t think as well in bodies sitting still as they do in bodies performing some sort of low-intensity motion. We know this intuitively — think of how many people, for instance, say they get their best ideas while walking — and yet so many classrooms and workplaces are designed to inihibit movement, designed on the premise that people think best while sitting still. Low-intensity movement improves attention and focus (as anybody who has used fidget toys during meetings knows), and yet we not only don’t design for it, we punish it. “Parents and teachers often believe they have to get kids to stop moving around before they can focus and get down to work,” Paul writes. But “a more constructive approach would be to allow kids to move around so that they can focus” (49).

      Another example of encouraging walking to think

  16. Jul 2021
    1. Anne: Do you think being in the US changed your life, changed you in any significant ways?Juan: Yes, because I lived in Provo, where all the Mormons are, and most of them are humble, most of them are nice people. I guess I got used to that. So at the moment, right now, I don't think I will ever adapt to the way people are here in Mexico. I don't know if you've met Mexicans who are from not the center, but the outside of the cities, their personality is just a lot different than a US citizen. They have different thoughts, different priorities, which makes them have different personalities.Juan: In that way, I am thankful that I grew up in the US, because the way that I am, I consider myself somebody who's humble. I don't really like to get in discussions or stuff like that. I'd rather just do my own thing, be respectful to everybody. The way you treat me is how I will treat you, that's the way I will always treat people with respect and stuff like that. In that way, I am thankful that I grew up in the US because I do have a different lookout in life.Anne: What do you miss most about the US?Juan: The vegetation, the nature, because I remember in the US I can go out in the soccer fields and there's actual grass. The mountains.Anne: It's beautiful.Juan: Yes. That's what I miss most about it, the nature.

      Reflections, The United States, Favorite parts, missing, Mexico, Worst parts about being back

  17. Jun 2021
    1. The mechanical clock, which came into common use in the 14th century, provides a compelling example. In Technics and Civilization, the historian and cultural critic Lewis Mumford  described how the clock “disassociated time from human events and helped create the belief in an independent world of mathematically measurable sequences.” The “abstract framework of divided time” became “the point of reference for both action and thought.”

      Description of how a technology the clock changed the human landscape.

      Similar to the way humans might practice terraforming on their natural environment, what should we call the effect our natural environment has on us?

      What should we call the effect our technological environment has on us? technoforming?

      Evolution certainly indicates that there's likely both short and long-term effects.

      Who else has done research into this? Do we have evidence of massive changes with the advent of writing, reading, printing, telegraph, television, social media, or other technologies available?

      Any relation to the nature vs nurture debate?

  18. May 2021
  19. Mar 2021
  20. Feb 2021
  21. Dec 2020
  22. Oct 2020
  23. learn-us-east-1-prod-fleet02-xythos.content.blackboardcdn.com learn-us-east-1-prod-fleet02-xythos.content.blackboardcdn.com
    1. For the law ofnature, like every law concerning men in this world, would befutile if no-one had power to enforce it and thereby preservethe innocent and restrain offenders

      agrees with Hobbes in that laws of nature need an enforcer- just instead says every man has this power

  24. Sep 2020
    1. Context

      The Zhuangzi is a large collection of tells, anecdotes, parables, allegories, and fables which are often not serious or comical in nature. These anecdotes try to identify and demonstrate the vanity and uncertain human distinctions between some of the next opposites, life and death, good and bad, big and small, but really also highlights human and nature. This tells mean to be part of ancient Chinese Philosophy. Zhuangzi or Master Zhuang he was one of the most significant first interpreters of Daoism. The Daoism is a pseudo religion and philosophical believing that has shape Chinese culture. “Your life has a limit, but knowledge has none. If you use what is limited to pursue what has no limit, you will be in danger. If you understand this and still strive for knowledge, you will be in danger for certain! If you do good, stay away from fame. If you do evil, stay away from punishments. Follow the middle; go by what is constant, and you can stay in once piece, keep yourself alive, look after your parents, and live out your years.” (Zhuangzi n.d.) The Utopia is reference to the perfect place where everything is equal. So for an actual urban development there is not a close relation between city and nature, as nature is only seen a resource or a place to settle, there is more to it, and there is where the Not-Even-Anything Village comes to place. A base principle on Daoism is the self-awareness of nature and we as a part of it, a way to settle an agreement to land and to everything. A Utopia should be work on similar interests to this Chinese idea of the perfect place to live or to build.

      Zhuangzi. The Zhuangzi, History of Chinese Philosophy. University of Hawaii, s.f.

    1. Thus, Confucius meditated upon water; and the Confucian Xunzi later attempted to systematize the relationship between water’s various forms and people’s moral qualities. This assumption of a correspondence between the principles which inform both water and human conduct was not limited to the Confucians; it was generally assumed in all early philosophical texts. Nor was the imagery the provenance of any particular school. For example, water which moves forward without force, giving life to everything, is described in Xunzi as ‘wuwei’ (without action) or (doing nothing) a term that is particularly associated with Daoism.

      CONTEXT: Shuen-fu Lin addresses "the sage", the person with the highest spiritual attainment who was first emulated and thought of in the Wei-Jin movement, following the Han Dynasty. The sage allows the innate tendencies and has all five of the human emotions addressed in the passage, but "...does not act, complies, and does not implement. He eliminates what leads things astray and gets rid of what confuses them." The sage is addressed as exhibiting qualities of both the Daoist way of life and the Confucianist way. The sage is like the image of water that is an unattainable, sage-like, presence and moral conduct, desired by both Daoist and Confucianist beliefs. "Gentlemen" look at water in awe, gazing upon the perfection of its inaction and lack of effort in attaining its intellect, beauty, and respect. The water has of "ziran", or perhaps, is "ziran" that humans are able to express communion with nature and nonpurposive action. This word is also described as spontaneously existing and being "so oneself" -nothing acting behind them. Water does not decide or dwell for too long, it just exists in movement and in detachment which I think human beings desire greatly.

      Cai, Zongqi. Chinese Aesthetics: The Ordering of Literature, the Arts, and the Universe in the Six Dynasties. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press, 2004.

      RELATE: In 'The Experience of Nature' by Rachel and Stephen Kaplan, human action and thought is addressed as influenced by our setting/environment whether the setting require immediate responsive action or the response take place in a slower, observational method varies. The authors write, "People are particularly aware of information that is visual, that concerns what they see. That does not mean that people interpret the information in visual terms exclusively; rather, visual stimuli are effective in conjuring associated information. The sight of water provides information about potential opportunities which may or may not be visual in themselves" (Kaplan, 4). Reverie from observation that allows self reflection, thought free from distraction, and intuitive action is typically included in our broader categorization of landscape qualities when we discuss as landscape architects. Human reaction to landscape is so much bigger than the texture, color, or even kinesthetic feeling within the place and can be thought of as artwork in addition- prompting development of thought even subconsciously within the the one experiencing.

      Kaplan, Rachel, and Stephen Kaplan. The Experience of Nature: A Psychological Perspective. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989.

  25. Aug 2020
  26. Jul 2020
  27. Jun 2020
    1. The man who publishes and edits an article written by an anonymous critic should be held as immediately responsible for it as if he had written it himself; just as one holds a manager responsible for bad work done by his workmen [who] would be treated as he deserves to be — namely, without any ceremony. An anonymous writer is a literary fraud against whom one should immediately cry out, “Wretch, if you do not wish to admit what it is you say against other people, hold your slanderous tongue.”
    2. However, the public is very much more interested in matter than in form, and it is for this very reason that it is behindhand in any high degree of culture. […] This preference for matter to form is the same as a man ignoring the shape and painting of a fine Etruscan vase in order to make a chemical examination of the clay and colors of which it is made.
  28. May 2020
  29. Apr 2020
    1. For centuries, human beings have measured their lives by the cycles of the seasons and the natural rhythms of sunrise and sunset. Yet now research reveals we are losing our connection with nature.
    2. revised the Oxford Junior Dictionary, removing words from nature such as clover, lark, pasture, and blackberry to make room for computer-related words including blog, voice-mail, chatroom, and BlackBerry (Flood, 2015; see Kesebir & Kesebir, 2017). A recent study of language in fiction, film, and popular songs has identified a cultural shift away from words related to nature beginning in the 1950s and escalating to the present day.
  30. Mar 2020
    1. Today we walked for the first time from our home to the nearby veggie shop. A great experience of simplicity, minimalism, and nature. Feeling awesomely blessed.

  31. Dec 2019
    1. ruled by different laws and in which numerous circumstances enforce a belief that the aspect of nature differs essentially from anything of which we have any experience.

      FIX

    2. The appearance of the sky is indiscribably beautiful; clear by day, and illuminated at night by the Aurora Borealis w which spreads a roseate tinge over the heavens, & over the sea which reflects it’s splendour.

      Aurora Borealis or "northern lights" appear in the Arctic skies, a nighttime phenomenon caused by turbulence in the magnetosphere.

    1. when I reflect that you are pursuing the same course, exposing yourself to the same dangers which have rendered me what I am, I imagine that you may deduce an apt moral from my tale; one that may direct you if you succeed in your undertaking, and console you in case of failure. Prepare to hear of occurrences which are usually deemed marvellous. Were we among the tamer scenes of nature, I might fear to encounter your unbelief, perhaps your ridicule; but many things will appear possible in these wild and mysterious regions, which would provoke the laughter of those unacquainted with the ever-varied powers of nature:—nor can I doubt bu

      In this revision, the 1831 edition makes Victor far more explicit about the parallels between his own quest for knowledge as power and Walton's expedition. Victor also attributes this insight to the sublime context of their Arctic location. The 1818 edition only suggests Walton will learn from Victor's story.

    1. below Mayence

      The region south of Mayence might be more picturesque because of the Kühkopf-Knoblochsaue, now a well-known nature preserve.

    2. the principles of Agrippa

      In his book De Occulta Philosophia Agrippa suggested that God placed magic in the world to make man capable of transcending the natural sphere and able to influence the superior realms.

    3. I have visited the lakes of Lucerne and Uri

      Lake Lucerne is a lake in central Switzerland and the fourth largest in the country. Lake Uri, also in Switzerland, is known for its reflective blue waters.

    1. I realize there are some instances where it isn’t clear that the artist/designer intended to show a living butterfly, and where it may be perfectly acceptable to represent a dead butterfly. Nonetheless, there’s no good reason to depict a dead butterfly in the vast majority of situations. It doesn’t take much effort to be accurate about wing position. My hope is that the multitudes of butterfly images in our culture will gradually shift toward alive, which is how I prefer to think of them, and how I think these beautiful insects should be seen. If you hadn’t previously noted the difference between a living and a dead butterfly, I’m afraid you will now begin to see dead butterflies EVERYWHERE, as I do.
    1. Ranking the intelligence of animals seems an increasingly pointless exercise when one considers the really important thing: how well that animal is adapted to its niche
    1. lants speak in a chemical vocabulary we can’t directly perceive or comprehend. The first important discoveries in plant communication were made in the lab in the nineteen-eighties, by isolating plants and their chemical emissions in Plexiglas chambers, but Rick Karban, the U.C. Davis ecologist, and others have set themselves the messier task of studying how plants exchange chemical signals outdoors, in a natural setting.
  32. Nov 2019
    1. were the peoples of the world to grasp the true significance of the words of God, they would never be deprived of their portion of the ocean of His bounty

      Bounty comes from understanding the words. The Revelation is, firstly, the words (and the spiritual energy they contain).

  33. Oct 2019
    1. mon pays et moi,

      La métamorphose du narrateur est visible dans ce vers. Le narrateur qui était autrefois critique est maintenant fier de son pays. Il utilise le mot « nous » pour décrire son sentiment d’unité entre lui-même et les gens de son pays. Il se présente aussi comme peu. « ma main petite maintenant dans son poing énorme » Il s’agit d’un changement par rapport à son ton divin au début du poème. Maintenant, c’est son pays qui est plus grand et plus puissant que lui. Il illustre peut-être que, dans l’unité, les gens de son pays sont beaucoup plus forts que lui-même.

    2. A force de regarder les arbres je suis devenu un arbre et mes longs pieds d’arbre ont creusé dans le sol de larges sacs à venin de hautes villes d’ossements à force de penser au Congo je suis devenu un Congo bruissant de forêts et de fleuves

      Dans une manière biblique, Césaire regarde un arbre et décide de devenir un arbre. Ses pieds deviennent les racines de l’arbre. Il se confond avec la terre, et ainsi, son pays. Il est maintenant enraciné, comme un arbre, et comme son peuple. Il est stagnant, tout comme le trait même qu’il a critiqué son peuple. Son enracinement est toxique. Ou la ville est-elle toxique ? Dans cet extrait, Césaire met également en parallèle la ville et la nature.

      L’image de devenir un arbre peut être interprétée comme le désir de Césaire pour l’île de revenir à sa forme « naturelle », sa forme avant qu’elle ne soit colonisée. Césaire compare la « civilisation » (colonialisme) au poison.

    3. Je retrouverais le secret des grandes communications et des grandes combustions. Je dirais orage. Je dirais fleuve. Je dirais tornade. Je dirais feuille. Je dirais arbre. Je serais mouillé de toutes les pluies, humecté de toutes les rosées. Je roulerais comme du sang frénétique sur le courant lent de l’oeil des mots en chevaux fous en enfants frais en caillots en couvre-feu en vestiges de temple en pierres précieuses assez loin pour décourageur les mineurs. Qui ne me comprendrait pas ne comprendrait pas davantage le rugissement du tigre.

      Il désire s’identifier avec tous les opprimés de son pays et établir des liens avec eux avec le « secret des grandes communications. » Encore une fois, d’une manière biblique, Césaire se compare à Dieu. Tout comme dans l’Ancien Testament, Césaire contemple toutes les choses qu’il dirait comme « fleuve, […] tornade, […] feuille » et elles apparaîtront, comme s’il était Dieu. Avec ce pouvoir, il désire relâcher une terreur de catastrophes naturelles sur son pays pour qu’il puisse recommencer a nouveau. D’une certaine façon, Césaire ridiculise le catholicisme. C’est la religion des colonisateurs, ses oppresseurs, qu’ils ont imposée à son peuple. À mon avis, Césaire a une sorte de complexe de dieu tout au long de son poème. Pourtant, il se moque aussi du catholicisme en quelque sorte.

    4. Sur cette terre exorcisée, larguée a la dérive de sa précieuse intention maléfique

      Césaire emploie une assonance en [e] dans cet extrait. Il parle encore de la Martinique. En utilisant le champ lexique de la nature et de l’enfer.

    5. Que de sang dans ma mémoire ! Dans ma mémoire sont des lagunes.

      Césaire fait constamment référence au paysage de la Martinique, et le poème déborde d’un merveilleux catalogue de noms : rivières, fleurs, arbres. Aussi beau que soit son pays, il est couvert de violence et de sang. En superposant l’image de la belle nature et de la violence horrible, Césaire rend son image encore plus puissante.

    6. Des mots ? quand nous manions des quartiers de monde, quand nous épousons des continents en délire, quand nous forçons de fumantes portes, des mots, ah oui, des mots ! mais des mots de sang frais, des mots qui sont des raz-de-marée et des érésipèles et des paludismes et des laves et des feux de brousse, et des flambées de chair, et des flambées de villes…

      Césaire affirme que pour soutenir la poésie, il faut détruire les faussetés du monde. Pour décrire l’impact des mots, il les compare aux aspects mystiques de la nature tels que les marées et les feux de forêt.

  34. Jul 2019
    1. The wind that blowsIs all that any body

      This statement reminds me of the unpredictability of nature and of life. We cannot predict what life will bring and we certainly are not all-knowing. Therefore, as Thoreau says, "the wind that blows is all that any body knows."

    2. w them. On the 1st of April it rained and melted the ice, and in the early part of the day, which was very foggy, I heard a stray goose groping about over the pond and cackling as if lost, or like the spirit

      Thoreau uses description and narration here to paint a picture of the natural world around him, the sounds and imagery. I found it interesting that he compared the cackling of the goose to the "spirit of the fog."

  35. May 2019
    1. “Hiking through the Grand Canyon is the closest to hell that I expect to come before I get there when I die,” Fedarko told Outside in August, after pulling out of 105-degree weather to rest. He wrapped up the hike on November 18. “There’s no exaggeration. That’s not hyperbole. It’s absolutely the most physical challenge that Pete and I have endured in our lives.”

      Damn! I want an experience like this

  36. Mar 2019
    1. Japanese gardens (日本庭園, nihon teien) are traditional gardens[1] whose designs are accompanied by Japanese aesthetic and philosophical ideas, avoid artificial ornamentation, and highlight the natural landscape.

      Brief definition of a Japanese Garden.

    1. Crucial to understanding the workings of power is an understandingof the nature of power in the fullness of its materiality. To restrict power’sproductivity to the limited domain of the “social,” for example, or tofigure matter as merely an end product rather than an active factor infurther materializations, is to cheat matter out of the fullness of its capacity.

      The nature of power is material as well as social.

  37. Feb 2019
    1. the melancholy mournings of the turtle,

      gilmanhernandez already linked to the video I was considering, but (according to a cursory search of YouTube at least) videos of turtle sounds are also likely to be videos of turtles mating or attempting to mate, so how 'mournful' they are is perhaps up to interpretation... 😂

    1. the heart of her educational scheme was lo be a method of thinking that could be applied in any area

      Okay, this is is more specific, similar to Wollstonecraft, as curlyQ pointed out.

      What's interesting here is Astell's saying that she isn't "exceptional"--by that she seems to mean that she is no different or more outstanding than other women, that she doesn't have some special ability or nature (just the same natural inclinations as others).

      This resonates with Wollstonecraft's Rights in her insistence that women are not by nature the 'inferior' sex but are instead bred that way due to poor education. By distancing herself from the term "exceptional", Astell seems to be doing something similar, pointing not to any particularly special nature or natural ability but instead a sound education.

    2. naturally attracted them to these qualities when they were en­countered in the world. Additionally. innate human reason

      Would the belief in innate, natural qualities be contrary to John Locke's idea of the tabula rasa? I don't know enough of Locke to know whether innate qualities would be part of what's swept off the slate.

    1. o far only as it is beneficial {l,16�(' or hurtful to the true believers.

      By nature, humans are selfish. We're always thinking, whether consciously or not, "what's in it for me?" We deem actions that have a potential benefit to us as praiseworthy, while label unbeneficial actions as hurtful.

    1. 011 1/w Ed11catio11 of Girls (published in 1687),

      Cf. Wollstonecraft's Vindication of the Rights of Woman, written about 100 years later, making a similar argument. Specifically, Wollstonecraft argues that women are not naturally inferior or frivolous but have been bred that way through poor education. Taken in comparison to the Enlightenment's exploration of human nature and with a lack of significant progress between 1687 and 1792 (outside of literacy, noted below), it seems clear that "human nature" really means "man's nature."

  38. Jan 2019
    1. He acts it as life, before he apprehends it as truth. In like manner, nature is already, in its forms and tendencies, describing its own design.

      What is implied about how we know what we know here? What might be some problems with this argument?

    2. OUR age is retrospective. It builds the sepulchres of the fathers. It writes biographies, histories, and criticism. The foregoing generations beheld God and nature face to face; we, through their eyes. Why should not we also enjoy an original relation to the universe?

      What is the contrast in generations RWE sets up here? What is the problem with his generation in the middle of the 19th century?

    1. real, ‘natural’ order

      How does interpretation of the natural order differ depending on one's paradigm?

    2. nature/culture framework in terms of the real and the sym-bolic.

      Perhaps unrelated, but I'm reminded here of a passage from Cormac McCarthy's The Crossing -- "The world has no name, he said. The names of the cerros and the sierras and the deserts exist only on maps. We name them that we do not lose our way. Yet it was because the way was lost to us already that we have made those names. The world cannot be lost. We are the ones. And it is because these names and these are our own naming that they cannot save us. That they cannot find for us the way again" (387).

      I like this quote because it makes explicit the real/symbolic distinction that we apply to nature, similar to Siegert's music example. The world simply exists, but we interact with it symbolically, assigning names and numbers to denote physical locations or geographic/geological features.

    1. nature—as opposed to cul-ture—is ahistorical and timeless?

      Doreen Massey has an interesting book that touches on this (Space, Place, and Gender), where she points out that time and space are treated as binaries, where time is typically masculine and dynamic and space is feminine and static. Nature (gendered feminine) is spatial, a place, and therefore not a time ("ahistorical and timeless"). Culture, on the other hand, is temporal, dynamic, masculine. It's a very particular rhetoric which begs the "which one?" question.

      (While Massey points out this common way of conceiving of time/space and binaries in general [A vs. Not A], she argues that the concept of space needs to be defined on its own merit, distinct from its binary opposite.)

    2. But representationalism (like “nature itself,” notmerely our representations of it!) has a history.

      Is it our human nature to always perform our identity? can we ever separate ourselves from it?

  39. Dec 2018
  40. Nov 2018
    1. ಅಯ್ಯಾ ನಿನ್ನ ಸಂಗದಲ್ಲಿ ಸಂಗಿಯಾದೆಅಯ್ಯಾ, ನಿನ್ನ ಸಂಗದಿಂದ ಕಾಕುತನವ ಬಿಟ್ಟುಬೇಕಾದ ಹಾಂಗೆಯಾದೆ.ಅಯ್ಯಾ, ನಿನ್ನ ಒಲವು ಅನೇಕ ಪ್ರಕಾರದಲ್ಲಿಪಸರಿ ಪರ್ಬಿತ್ತು ಎನ್ನ ಸರ್ವಾಂಗದಲ್ಲಿ.ನಿನ್ನವರೊಲುಮೆಯ ಆನಂದವನು ಎನಗೆ ಕರುಣಿಸುಕಪಿಲಸಿದ್ಧಮಲ್ಲಿಕಾರ್ಜುನಯ್ಯಾ ನಿಮ್ಮ ಧರ್ಮ.
    2. ಅಸಂಖ್ಯಾತ ಆದಿಬ್ರಹ್ಮರುತ್ಪತ್ಯವಾಗದಂದು,ಅಸಂಖ್ಯಾತ ಆದಿನಾರಾಯಣರುತ್ಪತ್ಯವಾಗದಂದು,ಅಸಂಖ್ಯಾತ ಸುರೇಂದ್ರಾದಿಗಳು ಉತ್ಪತ್ಯವಾಗದಂದು,ಅಸಂಖ್ಯಾತ ಮನುಮುನಿ ದೈತ್ಯರು ಉತ್ಪತ್ಯ ಲಯವಾಗದಂದು,ಓಂಕಾರವೆಂಬ ಆದಿಪ್ರಣವವಾಗಿದ್ದನು ನೋಡಾನಮ್ಮ ಅಪ್ರಮಾಣಕೂಡಲಸಂಗಮದೇವ.
    3. ಅಂಗದ ಮೇಲೊಂದು ಲಿಂಗವು, ಲಿಂಗದ ಮೇಲೊಂದು ಅಂಗವು.ಆವುದು ಘನವೆಂಬೆ ? ಆವುದು ಕಿರಿದೆಂಬೆ ?ತಾಳೋಷ್ಠಸಂಪುಟಕ್ಕೆ ಬಾರದ ಘನ, ಉಭಯಲಿಂಗವಿರಹಿತವಾದ ಶರಣ.ಕೂಡಲಚೆನ್ನಸಂಗಾ ಲಿಂಗೈಕ್ಯವು.
    4. ಅಯ್ಯಾ ಆರೂ ಇಲ್ಲದ ಅರಣ್ಯದಲ್ಲಿ, ನಾನಡಿಯಿಟ್ಟು ನಡವುತ್ತಿರ್ದೆನಯ್ಯಾ.ಮುಂದೆ ಬರೆಬರೆ ಮಹಾಸರೋವರವ ಕಂಡೆ.ಸರೋವರದೊಳಗೊಂದು ಹಿರಿಯ ಮೃಗವ ಕಂಡೆ.ಆ ಮೃಗಕ್ಕೆ ಕೊಂಬುಂಟು ತಲೆಯಿಲ್ಲ,ಬಾಯುಂಟು ಕಣ್ಣಿಲ್ಲ, ಕೈಯುಂಟು ಹಸ್ತವಿಲ್ಲ,ಕಾಲುಂಟು ಹೆಜ್ಜೆಯಿಲ್ಲ, ಒಡಲುಂಟು ಪ್ರಾಣವಿಲ್ಲ.ಇದ ಕಂಡು ನಾ ಹೆದರಿ, ಹವ್ವನೆ ಹಾರಿ, ಬೆದರಿ ಬಿದ್ದೆನಯ್ಯಾ.ಆಗೆನ್ನ ಹೆತ್ತತಾಯಿ ಬಂದು ಎತ್ತಿ ಕುಳ್ಳಿರಿಸಿ,ಚಿತ್ತಮೂಲಾಗ್ನಿಯ ಒತ್ತಿ ಉರುಹಿದರೆ, ಇವೆಲ್ಲವು ಸುಟ್ಟು ಬಟ್ಟಬಯಲಾದವು.ಆ ಬಟ್ಟಬಯಲೊಳಗೆ ಅಡಿಯಿಟ್ಟು ನಡೆವಾಗ,ಮುಂದೆ ಇಟ್ಟಡಿಯ ಬಾಗಿಲೊಳಗೆ ಮತ್ತೊಂದು ಮೃಗವ ಕಂಡೆ.ಆ ಮೃಗಕ್ಕೆ ತಲೆಯುಂಟು ಕೊಂಬಿಲ್ಲ, ಕಣ್ಣುಂಟು ಬಾಯಿಲ್ಲ,ಹಸ್ತವುಂಟು ಕೈಯಿಲ್ಲ, ಹೆಜ್ಜೆಯುಂಟು ಕಾಲಿಲ್ಲ, ಪ್ರಾಣವುಂಟು ಒಡಲಿಲ್ಲ.ಇದ ಕಂಡು ನಾ ಅಪ್ಪಿಕೊಳಹೋದಡೆ, ಮುಟ್ಟದ ಮುನ್ನವೆ ಎನ್ನನೆ ನುಂಗಿತ್ತು.ನುಂಗಿದ ಮೃಗ ಮಹಾಲಿಂಗದಲ್ಲಿಯೆ ಅಡಗಿತ್ತು,ಬಸವಪ್ರಿಯ ಕೂಡಲಚೆನ್ನಬಸವಣ್ಣಾ.
    5. ಅಂಥ ಬ್ರಹ್ಮಾಂಡವ ಎಪ್ಪತ್ತೈದುಲಕ್ಷದ ಮೇಲೆಸಾವಿರದೇಳುನೂರಾ ನಲವತ್ತೆಂಟುಬ್ರಹ್ಮಾಂಡವನೊಳಕೊಂಡುದೊಂದು ಭದ್ರವೆಂಬ ಭುವನ.ಆ ಭುವನದೊಳು ಭದ್ರಕರ್ಣನೆಂಬ ಮಹಾರುದ್ರಮೂರ್ತಿ ಇಹನು.ಆ ರುದ್ರಮೂರ್ತಿಯ ಓಲಗದಲ್ಲಿಎಂಟುನೂರಾ ಎಪ್ಪತ್ತುಕೋಟಿ ಚಂದ್ರಾದಿತ್ಯರು ವೇದಪುರುಷರುಮುನೀಂದ್ರರು ದೇವರ್ಕಳಿಹರು ನೋಡಾ.ಎಂಟುನೂರಾ ಎಪ್ಪತ್ತುಕೋಟಿ ರುದ್ರ-ಬ್ರಹ್ಮ-ನಾರಾಯಣಇಂದ್ರಾದಿ ದೇವರ್ಕಳಿಹರು ನೋಡಾಅಪ್ರಮಾಣಕೂಡಲಸಂಗಮದೇವಾ.
    6. ಅಯ್ಯಾ ಆರೂ ಇಲ್ಲದ ಅರಣ್ಯದಲ್ಲಿ, ನಾನಡಿಯಿಟ್ಟು ನಡವುತ್ತಿರ್ದೆನಯ್ಯಾ.ಮುಂದೆ ಬರೆಬರೆ ಮಹಾಸರೋವರವ ಕಂಡೆ.ಸರೋವರದೊಳಗೊಂದು ಹಿರಿಯ ಮೃಗವ ಕಂಡೆ.ಆ ಮೃಗಕ್ಕೆ ಕೊಂಬುಂಟು ತಲೆಯಿಲ್ಲ,ಬಾಯುಂಟು ಕಣ್ಣಿಲ್ಲ, ಕೈಯುಂಟು ಹಸ್ತವಿಲ್ಲ,ಕಾಲುಂಟು ಹೆಜ್ಜೆಯಿಲ್ಲ, ಒಡಲುಂಟು ಪ್ರಾಣವಿಲ್ಲ.ಇದ ಕಂಡು ನಾ ಹೆದರಿ, ಹವ್ವನೆ ಹಾರಿ, ಬೆದರಿ ಬಿದ್ದೆನಯ್ಯಾ.ಆಗೆನ್ನ ಹೆತ್ತತಾಯಿ ಬಂದು ಎತ್ತಿ ಕುಳ್ಳಿರಿಸಿ,ಚಿತ್ತಮೂಲಾಗ್ನಿಯ ಒತ್ತಿ ಉರುಹಿದರೆ, ಇವೆಲ್ಲವು ಸುಟ್ಟು ಬಟ್ಟಬಯಲಾದವು.ಆ ಬಟ್ಟಬಯಲೊಳಗೆ ಅಡಿಯಿಟ್ಟು ನಡೆವಾಗ,ಮುಂದೆ ಇಟ್ಟಡಿಯ ಬಾಗಿಲೊಳಗೆ ಮತ್ತೊಂದು ಮೃಗವ ಕಂಡೆ.ಆ ಮೃಗಕ್ಕೆ ತಲೆಯುಂಟು ಕೊಂಬಿಲ್ಲ, ಕಣ್ಣುಂಟು ಬಾಯಿಲ್ಲ,ಹಸ್ತವುಂಟು ಕೈಯಿಲ್ಲ, ಹೆಜ್ಜೆಯುಂಟು ಕಾಲಿಲ್ಲ, ಪ್ರಾಣವುಂಟು ಒಡಲಿಲ್ಲ.ಇದ ಕಂಡು ನಾ ಅಪ್ಪಿಕೊಳಹೋದಡೆ, ಮುಟ್ಟದ ಮುನ್ನವೆ ಎನ್ನನೆ ನುಂಗಿತ್ತು.ನುಂಗಿದ ಮೃಗ ಮಹಾಲಿಂಗದಲ್ಲಿಯೆ ಅಡಗಿತ್ತು,ಬಸವಪ್ರಿಯ ಕೂಡಲಚೆನ್ನಬಸವಣ್ಣಾ.
    1. ಆಕಾರ ನಿರಾಕಾರವೆಂಬೆರಡೂ ಸ್ವರೂಪಂಗಳು ;ಒಂದು ಆಹ್ವಾನ, ಒಂದು ವಿಸರ್ಜನ,ಒಂದು ವ್ಯಾಕುಳ, ಒಂದು ನಿರಾಕುಳ.ಉಭಯಕುಳರಹಿತ ಗುಹೇಶ್ವರಾ_ನಿಮ್ಮ ಶರಣ ನಿಶ್ವಿಂತನು.
    1. ರಾಕಾರವೆಂಬೆರಡೂ ಸ್ವರೂಪಂಗಳು ;ಒಂದು ಆಹ್ವಾನ, ಒಂದು ವಿಸರ್ಜನ,ಒಂದು ವ್ಯಾಕುಳ, ಒಂದು ನಿರಾಕುಳ.ಉಭಯಕುಳರಹಿತ ಗುಹೇಶ್ವರಾ_ನಿಮ್ಮ ಶರಣ ನಿಶ್ವಿಂತನು.
    1. The truth is, none of us are born scientists. When we say "children are natural scientists", what we mean is that they're naturally inquisitive and willing to experiment in ways adults are generally trained out of. We have to be taught to channel that inquisitiveness into productive pathways, both in STEM and non-STEM fields. And we have to do a helluva lot better at not reinforcing the message that scientists are intrinsically smarter than non-scientists, and that only the geniuses can do science.
  41. Sep 2018
    1. People who take pills to block out from memory the painful or hateful aspects of a new experience will not learn how to deal with suffering or sorrow. A drug that induces fearlessness does not produce courage.

      He does a really good job pointing out some of the dangers of effortlessly overcoming fear at the cost of learning courage and struggle at the cost of learning discipline but he doesn't really touch on how in time we might recognize the side effect these biomedical technologies bring and human nature might push back against it. Kind of like with genetically modified foods now all people want is organic food.