244 Matching Annotations
  1. Last 7 days
    1. Moving beyond its role merely as a storehouse, generative aspects of the memory arts were highlighted by scholars like Raymond Llull. He designed mnemonic charts for considering all angles of an issue so as to arrive at otherwise unthought-of possibilities [Kircher, 1669]. This medieval system, consisting of diagrams and accompanying letters for easier exposition, was revived by the Jesuit polymath Athanasius Kircher [FIGURES 5 and 6].

      Raymond Llull's combinatoric art of memory was revived by Jesuit polymath Athanasius Kircher.

      want to read:

      Kircher, Athanasius, Artis Magnae Sciendi (Amsterdam, 1669).

  2. Jan 2022
    1. In this respect, Krajewski’s distinction between ‘search machines’ and ‘scholarly ma-chines’ is insufficient. Cf. Krajewski, ZettelWirtschaft, 66–7

      What does Alberto Cevolini mean here? Read the reference to determine.

    2. Christoph Meinel, ‘Enzyklopädie der Welt und Verzettelung des Wissens: Aporien der Empirie bei Joachim Jungius’, in Enzyklopädien der frühen Neuzeit. Beiträge zu ihrer Er-forschung, ed. Franz M. Eybl (Tübingen, 1995), 162–87; Richard Yeo, ‘Loose Notes and Ca-pacious Memory: Robert Boyle’s Note-Taking and its Rationale’, Intellectual History Review 20 (2010), 335–54; Alberto Cevolini, ‘The Art of trascegliere e notare in Early Modern Ital-ian Culture’, Intellectual History Review 29 (2019), forthcoming.
    1. Until recently[30][31][32] there have been almost no attempts to compare the different theories and discuss them together.
      1. Letelier, J C; Cárdenas, M L; Cornish-Bowden, A (2011). "From L'Homme Machine to metabolic closure: steps towards understanding life". J. Theor. Biol. 286 (1): 100–113. Bibcode:2011JThBi.286..100L. doi:10.1016/j.jtbi.2011.06.033. PMID 21763318.
      2. Igamberdiev, A.U. (2014). "Time rescaling and pattern formation in biological evolution". BioSystems. 123: 19–26. doi:10.1016/j.biosystems.2014.03.002. PMID 24690545.
      3. Cornish-Bowden, A; Cárdenas, M L (2020). "Contrasting theories of life: historical context, current theories. In search of an ideal theory". BioSystems. 188: 104063. doi:10.1016/j.biosystems.2019.104063. PMID 31715221. S2CID 207946798.

      Relationship to the broader idea in Loewenstein as well...

    1. Severi (2015) discusses evidence for the use of pictographicwriting systems among the indigenous peoples of NorthAmerica, and why their characterization as ‘oral’ societies ismisleading in many ways.
    1. Bush 1939 Warning: Biblio formatting not applied. BushVannevar. Mechanization and the Record. Vannevar Bush Papers. Box 138, Speech Article Book File. Washington D.C. Library of Congress. 1939.

      Original paper that became The Atlantic article As We May Think (1945).

    1. http://www.focaalblog.com/2021/12/22/chris-knight-wrong-about-almost-everything/

      Chris Knight is a senior research fellow in anthropology at University College London, where he forms part of a team researching the origins of our species in Africa. His books include Blood Relations: Menstruation and the Origins of Culture (1991) and Decoding Chomsky: Science and Revolutionary Politics (2016).

      Another apparent refutation of Graeber and Wengrow.

    1. https://www.persuasion.community/p/a-flawed-history-of-humanity

      David A. Bell teaches history at Princeton and is the author, most recently, of Men on Horseback: The Power of Charisma in the Age of Revolution (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2020).

      Critique of Graeber and Wengrow's The Dawn of Everything

      Where is he right? Wrong? How does this dovetail with the evidence within the book?

  3. Dec 2021
  4. takingnotenow.blogspot.com takingnotenow.blogspot.com
    1. Not sure why Manfred Kuehn removed this website from Blogger, but it's sure to be chock full of interesting discussions and details on his note taking process and practice. Definitely worth delving back several years and mining his repository of articles here.

    1. Dreams or vision quests: among Iroquoian-speaking peoplesin the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries it was consideredextremely important literally to realize one’s dreams. ManyEuropean observers marvelled at how Indians would be willingto travel for days to bring back some object, trophy, crystal oreven an animal like a dog that they had dreamed of acquiring.Anyone who dreamed about a neighbour or relative’spossession (a kettle, ornament, mask and so on) couldnormally demand it; as a result, such objects would oftengradually travel some way from town to town. On the GreatPlains, decisions to travel long distances in search of rare orexotic items could form part of vision quests.34
      1. On ‘dream economies’ among the Iroquois see Graeber 2001: 145–9. David Graeber. 2001. Toward an Anthropological Theory of Value: The False Coin of Our Own Dreams. New York: Palgrave.

      These dreams and vision quests sound suspiciously familiar to Australian indigenous peoples' "dreaming" and could be incredibly similar to much larger and longer songlines in North American cultures.

    2. Most contemporaryarchaeologists are well aware of this literature, but tend to getcaught up in debates over the difference between ‘trade’ and‘gift exchange’, while assuming that the ultimate point of both isto enhance somebody’s status, either by profit, or by prestige,or both. Most will also acknowledge that there is somethinginherently valuable, even cosmologically significant, in thephenomenon of travel, the experience of remote places or theacquisition of exotic materials; but in the last resort, much ofthis too seems to come down to questions of status or prestige,as if no other possible motivation might exist for peopleinteracting over long distances; for some further discussion ofthe issues see Wengrow 2010b.

      David Wengrow 2010b. ‘The voyages of Europa: ritual and trade in the Eastern Mediterranean, c.2300–1850 .’ In William A. Parkinson and Michael L. Galaty (eds), Archaic State Interaction: The Eastern Mediterranean in the Bronze Age. Santa Fe: School for Advanced Research Press, pp. 141–60.

      Read this for potential evidence for the mnemonic devices for information trade theory.

    1. Professor Michael Lackner (Federal Ministry of Education and Research) has kindly made a pdf version of his German translation of Matteo Ricci’s Xiguo jifa, the Occidental Method of Memory (1596) available to the Art of Memory forum. Thought there may be some people on this forum who are interested in other books from Matteo Ricci. I’m hoping our German-English members could help translate to English. Reference: Lackner, Michael. (1986). Das vergessene Gedächtnis: Die jesuitische mnemotechnische Abhandlung Xiguo jifa, Übersetzung und Kommentar. Stuttgart: Franz Steiner. Thanks to Josh for uploading the document here: https://artofmemory.com/files/pdf/Michael_Lackner_Das_vergessene_Gedaechtnis.pdf
    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>David Wengrow</span> in Video: Graeber and Wengrow on the Myth of the Stupid Savage (<time class='dt-published'>12/19/2021 20:51:44</time>)</cite></small>

    1. The article that preceded the book ("Farewell to the 'childhood of man': ritual, seasonally, and the origins of inequality", https://doi.org/10.1111/1467-9655.12247) has been cited 57 times since 2015.
    1. critical edition of Harrison’s manuscript: Thomas Harrison, The Ark of Studies, ed. Alberto Cevolini (Turnhout, 2017)
    2. Helmut Zedelmaier, ‘Orte und Zeiten des Wissens’, Dialektik 2 (2000), 129–36, at 136. There is still little literature on Niklas Luhmann’s card indexing system. Nevertheless, thanks to some recent inquiries made by Johannes Schmidt, Luhmann’s note closet is one of the best studied card indexing systems among contemporaries. Cf. Detlef Horster, ‘Biographie im In-terview’, in Niklas Luhmann (München, 1997), 25–47; Alexander Smoltczyk, ‘Der Gral von Bielefeld’, Der Spiegel 41 (2003), 91; Jürgen Kaube, ‘Zettels Nachlass’, Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung 281: 8th Dec. (2007), 37; Jürgen Kaube, ‘Theorieproduktion ohne Technologiedefizit. Niklas Luhmann, sein Zettelkasten und die Ideengeschichte der Bundesrepublik’, in Was war Bielefeld? Eine Ideengeschichtliche Nachfrage, eds. Sonja Asal and Stephan Schlak (Göttin-gen, 2009), 161–70; Johannes Schmidt, ‘Luhmanns Zettelkasten und seine Publikationen’, in Luhmann–Handbuch. Leben–Werk–Wirkung, eds. Oliver Jahraus and Armin Nassehi (Stuttgart/ Weimar, 2012), 7–11; Johannes Schmidt, ‘Der Zettelkasten als Kommunikationspartner Niklas Luhmanns’, in Zettelkästen. Maschinen der Phantasie, eds. Heike Gefrereis and Ellen Strit-tmatter (Marbach, 2013), 85–95; Johannes Schmidt, ‘Der Nachlass Niklas Luhmanns – eine erste Sichtung: Zettelkasten und Manuskripte’, Soziale Systeme 19 (2013/14), 167–83; Johannes Schmidt, ‘Der Zettelkasten Niklas Luhmanns als Überraschungsgenerator’, in Serendipity. Vom Glück des Findens, ed. Friedrich Meschede (Köln, 2015), 153–67; Johannes Schmidt, ‘Nik-las Luhmann’s Card Index: Thinking Tool, Communication Partner, Publication Machine’, in Forgetting Machines. Knowledge Management Evolution in Early Modern Europe, ed. Alberto Cevolini (Leiden/Boston, 2016), 290–311.

      A seemingly large bibliography, however much of it is in German and very little is in English.

      I've got the J. Schmidt article from Forgetting Machines in my pile, but it's worth pulling other references in to see of English versions are available.

    1. Helmut Zedelmaier, "Buch, Exzerpt, Zettelschrank, Zettelkasten," in Archivprozesse: Die Kommunikation der Aufbewahrung, ed. Hedwig Pompe and Leander Scholz (Cologne: DuMont, 2002), 38–53.
    1. Our local personnel are Vesna Wallace and Cathy and myself, while our international partners and consultants include Janet Gyatso, Sarah Jacoby, Matthew Kapstein, Jonathan Silk, Lopon P. Ogyan Tanzin, and Antonio Terrone. Part of the project is simply to minutely track all the processes, over several generations, that gave us some of the terma literature we know so well today, while another part will be to achieve critically-aware knowledge transfers from Hebrew studies and the English medievalists into Tibetology. Through this, we aspire to help catalyse a broader debate on what authorship really means in Tibetan religious writing as a whole, in other genres beyond terma, so that our analysis might contribute to the understanding of Tibetan religious writings as a whole.

      Researchers looking into the ideas of inventio with respect to Tibetan religious literature...

      This was published in 2010, so it should have some resultant articles worth reading with respect to their work. I'm curious to compare it to the work of Parry & Lord.

    2. I invited Jonathan Silk to give a guest lecture, and aware of my interests, he obliged by delivering a wonderful paper entitled What Can Students of Indian Buddhist Literature Learn from Biblical Text Criticism?
  5. Nov 2021
    1. In Bound to Read, Jeffrey Todd Knight excavates this culture of compilation—of binding and mixing texts, authors, and genres into single volumes—and sheds light on a practice that not only was pervasive but also defined the period's very ways of writing and thinking.
    2. This looks interesting with respect to the flows of the history of commonplace books.

      Making the Miscellany: Poetry, Print, and the History of the Book in Early Modern England by Megan Heffernan

    1. Could the Blackfoot Wisdom that Inspired Maslow Guide Us Now? by Teju Ravilochan (contributing editors: Vidya Ravilochan and Colette Kessler) https://gatherfor.medium.com/maslow-got-it-wrong-ae45d6217a8c

      Apr 4, 2021

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>David Dylan Thomas</span> in Come and get yer social justice metaphors! (<time class='dt-published'>11/05/2021 11:26:10</time>)</cite></small>

    1. The Classicist Who Killed Homer How Milman Parry proved that the Iliad and the Odyssey were not written by a lone genius. By Adam Kirsch https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2021/06/14/the-classicist-who-killed-homer June 7, 2021

      Someone mentioned this in class today

    1. Jeremias Drexel,Aurifodina artium et scientiarum omnium: Excerpendi sollertia, omnibuslitterarum amantibus monstrata(Antwerp, 1638), pp. 68–69; hereafter abbreviatedA.
    2. Spin-offs from Drexel include Kergerus,Methodus drexeliana succinctior(1658) and P. Philomusus[Johannis Jacobus Labhart],Industria excerpendi brevis, facilis, amoena(Konstanz, 1684).
    3. A,as discussed in Helmut Zedelmaier, “Johann JakobMoser et l’organisation e ́rudite du savoir a` l’e ́poque moderne,” inLire, copier, e ́crire: LesBibliothe`ques manuscrites et leurs usages au XVIIIe sie`cle,ed. Elisabeth De ́cultot (Paris, 2003), p. 54.

      references

  6. Oct 2021
    1. Visual and auditory brain areas share a representational structure that supports emotion perception https://www.cell.com/current-biology/fulltext/S0960-9822(21)01283-5

      This portends some interesting results with relation to mnemonics and particularly songlines and indigenous peoples' practices which integrate song, movement, and emotion.

      Preprint: https://www.biorxiv.org/content/10.1101/254961v4

      Across the world, people express emotion through music and dance. But why do music and dance go together? <br><br>We tested a deceptively simple hypothesis: Music and movement are represented the same way in the brain.

      — Beau Sievers (@beausievers) October 12, 2021
      <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script>

      <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Beau Sievers </span> in "New work published today in Current Biology Visual and auditory brain areas share a representational structure that supports emotion perception With @ThaliaWheatley @k_v_n_l @parkinsoncm @sergeyfogelson (thread after coffee!) https://t.co/AURqH9kNLb https://t.co/ro4o4oEwk5" / Twitter (<time class='dt-published'>10/12/2021 09:26:10</time>)</cite></small>

  7. Sep 2021
    1. Likewise, the notes and sketches of artists and thinkers over the centuries bear testament to “that wordless conversation between the mind and the hand,” as the psychologist Barbara Tversky puts it in “Mind in Motion: How Action Shapes Thought.”
    2. This is the theory of the extended mind, introduced more than two decades ago by the philosophers Andy Clark and David Chalmers. A 1998 article of theirs published in the journal Analysis began by posing a question that would seem to have an obvious answer: “Where does the mind stop and the rest of the world begin?” They went on to offer an unconventional response. The mind does not stop at the usual “boundaries of skin and skull,” they maintained. Rather, the mind extends into the world and augments the capacities of the biological brain with outside-the-brain resources.

      https://icds.uoregon.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/Clark-and-Chalmers-The-Extended-Mind.pdf

      Where does the mind stop and the rest of the world begin?

      There seems to be a parallel between this question and that between the gene and the body. Evolution is working at the level of the gene, but the body and the environment are part of the extended system as well. Link these to Richard Dawkins idea of the extended gene and ideas of group selection.

      Are there effects to be seen on the evolutionary scale of group selection ideas with respect to the same sorts of group dynamics like the minimal group paradigm? Can the sorts of unconscious bias that occur in groups be the result of individual genes? This seems a bit crazy, but potentially worth exploring if there are interlinked effects based on this analogy.

    1. ☞(excerpts) Beal, Peter. Dictionary of English Manuscript Terminology: 1450 to 2000.Oxford, GB: OUP Oxford, 2007. ProQuest ebrary. Web. 19 December 2016.☞Lesser, Zachary and Peter Stallybrass. “The First Literary Hamlet and the Commonplacing of Professional Plays.” Shakespeare Quarterly, (2008), 371–420.☞Smyth, Adam. “Commonplace Book Culture: A List of Sixteen Traits.” Women and Writing, c.1340-c.1650: The Domestication of Print Culture. Manuscript Culture in the British Isles. Eds. Lawrence-Mathers, A. and Hardman, P. Rochester, U.S.: Boydell and Brewer, 90-110.☞Summers, David. “—the proverb is something musty: The Commonplace and Epistemic Crisis in Hamlet.”Hamlet Studies 20.1-2(1998): 9-34.

      sources to add to my reading list, if not already there

  8. Aug 2021
    1. For several examples of how commonplacing gave rise to filing systems during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries,see Malcolm, ‘Thomas Harrison and his “Ark of Studies”’.
    2. The impactof such practices upon eighteenth-century visual and material culture is recounted in te Heesen, The World in a Box.

      This reference appears to show some of the historical link between the method of loci in rhetoric with that of commonplacing ideas within books. The fact that the word box may suggest some relational link between commonplacing and zettelkasten.

    3. West, Theatres and Encyclopaedias, ch. 2; Garberson ‘Libraries, Memory and the Spaceof Knowledge’. For a multicultural introduction to the architectural imagery of early modern memory practices, seeSpence, The Memory Palace of Matteo Ricci.
    4. In recent decades there have been a number of stud-ies that have shown how humanist approaches to commonplacing not only evolved in tandemwith attempts to coherently arrange naturaliain studioli, wunderkammernand museums, butalso facilitated the conceptual development of natural history. Key works that led up to this rein-terpretation were Walter Ong’s work on Ramus, Frances Yates’s history of the art of memory,Tony Grafton’s defence of humanistic textual practices and, crucially, Paolo Rossi’s argumentthat Francis Bacon used topical logic to organize his lists and tables.7Once the topical box wasopened, a number of seminal studies on commonplacing natural knowledge followed. Keyentries in this canon are works written by Ann Blair, Ann Moss, Jonathan Spence and HowardHotson.8

      Lots of references to add or read here.

    1. Media and the Mind: Art, Science and Notebooks as Paper Machines, 1700-1830 (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2022), 550 pp + 60 figures.

      I can't wait to read Media and the Mind: Art, Science and Notebooks as Paper Machines, 1700-1830 (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2022)!

      I see some bits on annotation hiding in here that may be of interest to @RemiKalir and @anterobot.

      If you need some additional eyeballs on it prior to publication, I'm happy to mark it up in exchange for the early look.

    1. U.S. Senate Subcommittee on Communications, Technology, Innovation, and the Internet, "Optimizing for Engagement: Understanding the Use of Persuasive Technology on Internet Platforms," 25 June 2019, www.commerce.senate.gov/2019/6/optimizing-for-engagement-understanding-the-use-of-persuasive-technology-on-internet-platforms.

      Perhaps we need plurality in the areas for which social data are aggregated?

      What if we didn't optimize for engagement, but optimized for privacy, security, or other axes in the space?

    2. Francis Fukuyama et al., Middleware for Dominant Digital Platforms: A Technological Solution to a Threat to Democracy, Stanford Cyber Policy Center, 3, https://fsi-live.s3.us-west-1.amazonaws.com/s3fs-public/cpc-middleware_ff_v2.pdf.
  9. Jul 2021
    1. Diels, H. and W. Kranz, Die Fragmente der Vorsokratiker. Zürich/Hildesheim 1964 The standard collection of the texts of and the doxography on Anaximander and the other presocratics.
    1. Crenshaw and her classmates asked 12 scholars of color to come to campus and lead discussions about Bell’s book Race, Racism, and American Law. With that, critical race theory began in earnest.
    1. The Swedish 18th-century naturalist Carolus (Carl) Linnaeus is habitually credited with laying the foundations of modern taxonomy through the invention of binominal nomenclature. However, another innovation of Linnaeus' has largely gone unnoticed. He seems to have been one of the first botanists to leave his herbarium unbound, keeping the sheets of dried plants separate and stacking them in a purpose built-cabinet. Understanding the significance of this seemingly mundane and simple invention opens a window onto the profound changes that natural history underwent in the 18th century.

    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Alan Jacobs</span> in control and surrender, architecture and gardening – Snakes and Ladders (<time class='dt-published'>07/01/2021 09:42:40</time>)</cite></small>

    1. The relationship between Phillips — one of whose most famous works is A Humument, an ongoing-for-decades collage/manipulation/adaptation of a Victorian book — and Eno is a fascinating one in the history of aleatory or, as I prefer, emergent art.

      Humument sounds interesting, particularly the descriptions of collage/manipulation

      aleatory is a great word that one sees infrequently and all too randomly

    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Alan Jacobs</span> in July Check-In · Buttondown (<time class='dt-published'>07/01/2021 09:19:13</time>)</cite></small>

      Idea of John Paul II's encyclical being a form of blogging in a different era. They're all essays in form, it's just about distribution...

  10. Jun 2021
    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>Art Kavanagh </span> in note (<time class='dt-published'>06/16/2021 06:24:59</time>)</cite></small>

    1. <small><cite class='h-cite via'> <span class='p-author h-card'>juanjosefernandez</span> in 📚-reading (<time class='dt-published'>06/04/2021 16:32:12</time>)</cite></small>

    1. von Feinaigle, Gregor.The New Art of Memory: Founded Upon the Principles Taught by M. Gregor von Feinaigle. London, 1813.

      I thought this was in my reading list and my library, but perhaps it's not? Doublecheck.

    2. Delaney, Ian, Kate Danskin, Erin Clinch, eds.William Fulwood’s The Castel of Memorie. CreateSpace IndependentPublishing, 2013.
    3. Other treatises exemplifying the retreat of imagery from the fourth canon include Henry Herdson’sThe Art of Memory Made Plaine, which saw two printings in 1651 and another in 1654, and ThomasFuller’s 1641 bookThe Holy State and the Profane State, which contains a section“On Memory.”

      Add these to our list.

    4. Willis’s primary interest was shorthand writing—he is chiefly noted forArt of Stenographie—andhis memory treatise is clearly influenced by shorthand’s mechanism of one-to-one correspondence.

      John Willis's Mnemonica (Latin 1618, English 1621, 1654, and 1661) covers memory, but he was apparently more interested in shorthand writing and also wrote Art of Stenographie.

      I'll have to read this for a view into the overlap of memory and shorthand with respect to the development of the major system. Did this influence others in the chain of history? It definitely fits into the right timeline.

  11. May 2021