164 Matching Annotations
  1. Nov 2019
    1. Integrating Technology with Bloom’s Taxonomy

      This article was published by a team member of the ASU Online Instructional Design and New Media (IDNM) team at Arizona State University. This team shares instructional design methods and resources on the TeachOnline site for online learning. "Integrating Technology with Bloom's Taxonomy" describes practices for implementing 6 principles of Bloom's Digital Taxonomy in online learning. These principles include Creating, Evaluating, Analyzing, Applying, Understanding, and Remembering. The purpose of implementing this model is to create more meaningful and effective experiences for online learners. The author guides instructors in the selection of digital tools that drive higher-order thinking, active engagmenent, and relevancy. Rating 9/10

    1. Training and Development Policy Wiki

      This webpage, under the Office of Personnel Management (OPM) .gov site, provides an extensive list of technology resources that can be and have been implemented into a variety of employee deveolpment programs. These tools allow for more personalized learning, active participation, collaboration, and communication.In the first section of the site, examples of Web 2.0 tools are listed that can promote collaboration and constructive learning. You can also find technologies that are used in specific sectors, such as the Federal Government and the Private Sector. Clicking on the links redirects you to additional resources on the tech tools, including how to use them effectively and professionally for employee training. Rating 10/10

    1. Using Technology to Enhance Teaching & Learning

      This website provides technology teaching resources as part of the Southern Methodist University (SMU) Center for Teaching Excellence. Users can find informational links to various technology tools that can be used for enhancing teaching and learning in online, hybrid, or face-to-face courses. On the right of the page under "Technology," users can click on the tech tools for additional resources/research on their implementation. Examples of these technologies include Blackboard LMS, PowerPoint presentation software, Google Suite products, blogs, and social media sites. Rating 8/10

    1. Empowering Education: A New Model for In-service Training of Nursing Staff

      This research article explores an andragogical method of learning for the in-service training of nurses. In a study of a training period for 35 nurses, research found an empowering model of education that was characterized by self-directed learning and practical learning. This model suggests active participation, motivation, and problem-solving as key indicators of effective training for nurses. Rating 8/10

    1. Digital Literacy Initiatives

      This website outlines digital literacy initiatives provided by the Literacy Information and Communication System (LINCS). The U.S. Department of Education, Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education (OCTAE) implements these intitatives to aid adult learners in the successful use of technology in their education and careers. Students have free access to learning material on different subjects under the "LINCS Learner Center" tab. Teachers and tutors also have access to resoruces on implementing educational technology for professional development and effective instruction. Rating 8/10

    1. 1Engaging Adults Learners with TechnologyThrough

      Instruction Librarians from the Twin Cities Campus Library created this instructional gudie as a workshop for implementing technology for adult learning. First, the authors describe key characteristics of adult learners as identified in the theory of andragogy. Examples of these characteristics include the need to know, learner responsibility, past experiences, and motivation to learn. The authors then suggest instructional practices and activities to meet the needs of adult learners, Finally, they provide examples of technology tools for effectively engaging adult learners. Rating 10/10

    2. Designed to be used in a workshop setting, the content provides an understanding of adult learning theory and it's application of best practices in both face to face and e-learning environments. Participants are provided a list of web tools to facilitate learning.

      6/10: the format is bit difficult to access out of context

    1. ISTE Standards Transform learning and teaching.

      This resource is the website for the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE), which serves educators and professionals in the implementation of technology in education. The site provides open access readings, learning guides, and membership material for educators' development with technology. You can also find ISTE Standards for teachers, students, technology coaches, and educational leaders/administrators. These standards serve as the skills and knowledge each group should obtain for effective teaching and learning with technology.

    1. Section 1.5 Online Learner Characteristics, Technology and Skill Requirements

      This website outlines Section 1.5 of Angelo State University's guide to instructional design and online teaching. Section 1.5 describes key characteristics of online learners, as well as the technology and computer skills that research has identified as being important for online learners. Successful online learners are described as self-directed, motivated, well-organized, and dedicated to their education. The article also notes that online learners should understand how to use technology such as multimedia tools, email, internet browsers. and LMS systems. This resource serves as a guide to effective online teaching. Rating 10/10

    1. E-Learning Theory (Mayer, Sweller, Moreno)

      This website outlines key principles of the E-Learning Theory developed by Mayer, Sweller, and Moreno. E-Learning Theory describes how the implementation of educational technology can be combined with key principles of how we learn for better outcomes. This site describes those principles as a guide of more effective instructional design. Users can also find other learning theories under the "Categories" link at the top of the page. Examples include Constructivist theories, Media & Technology theories, and Social Learning theories. Rating: 8/10

    1. Learning Domains

      This website provides several examples of domains adults may learn in or engage with. By clicking on each type, you are redirected to a detailed description of the domain. Descriptions include, but are not limited to, definitions, theories and research behind the topic, and real-world examples. You can also find references used in the description, which can be helpful for further exploration. This InstructionalDesign.org website also provides extensive lists of learning concepts (i.e. motivation, personalized learning, storyboard, etc.) and theories (i.e. Adult Learning Theory, Social Learning, Constructivism, etc.). Each learning theory link provides a theoretical definition, applications, examples, key principles, references, and related websites. Rating 10/10.

    1. Tech Literacy Resources

      This website is the "Resources" archive for the IgniteED Labs at Arizona State University's Mary Lou Fulton Teachers College. The IgniteED Labs allow students, staff, and faculty to explore innovative and emerging learning technology such as virtual reality (VR), artifical intelligence (AI), 3-D printing, and robotics. The left side of this site provides several resources on understanding and effectively using various technologies available in the IgniteED labs. Each resources directs you to external websites, such as product tutorials on Youtube, setup guides, and the products' websites. The right column, "Tech Literacy Resources," contains a variety of guides on how students can effectively and strategically use different technologies. Resources include "how-to" user guides, online academic integrity policies, and technology support services. Rating: 9/10

    1. In the text "10 Current and Emerging Trends in Adult Education," ten current trends are briefly reviewed. Among these are the emphasis on effort, growth, and social-emotional learning. In terms of technology, real-life simulations and AI are being used to better prepare learners for their professional encounters and responsibilities. In terms of what is on the horizon for adult learning, one can expect mastery to be emphasized rather than degrees. As a result of the information economy, it is expected that income inequality will grow and thus advocacy for adult learners and continued opportunities for working adults to grow will mitigate the negative consequences. Rating: 7/10

  2. www-chronicle-com.libproxy.nau.edu www-chronicle-com.libproxy.nau.edu
    1. Technology

      This website explores technology news within the field of higher education. The site contains a wide variety of news articles on current issues, trends, and research surrounding the integration of technology in universities and colleges. This includes technology's prevalence in teaching and learning, institutional decisions, and societal trends of higher education. The articles are published by authors for "The Chronicle of Higher Education," a leading newspaper and website for higher education journalism. Rating: 7/10

    1. Hodson relates specific examples of effective technology integration in her classrooms. Although she acknowledges the apprehension both instructors and learners feel, she argues that the benefits outweigh them.

      7/10

    2. Twitter offers two distinct benefits to engaging learners. First of all, it allows learners to respond to classroom discussions in a way that feels right for them, offering shy or introverted students a chance to participate in the class discussion without having to speak in a public forum. Secondly, it allows students to continue the conversation after class is completed, posting relevant links to course material, and reaching out to you (the educator) with additional thoughts or questions.

      The article explains how social media, student learning through digital experience, and Learning Management Systems can be beneficial to the learner/student. Article Rating: 3/5

    1. Although not specifically geared toward adult learning, the article includes valuable insight into the role technology can play in non-profit organizations. Boles's focuses on how non-profit organizations can enhance their work integrating technology into three key areas: service delivery, fundraising, and outreach. Of particular interest are the sections on barriers to integration and how to overcome them.

      7/10

    1. The authors present a study that compared face to face and hybrid instruction in graduate classes for counseling students. The results indicate that using technology, including web tools to facilitate instruction, improved test results in a small sample of students.

      8/10

    1. Flores examines the current research as it relates to distance learning. She explores technology integration and learning theory. Throughout, she stresses the importance of professional development for instructors to equip them to provide quality distance education.

      10/10

    1. The authors detail their development of a professional learning community to advance technology integration at Nova Southeastern University. After a literature review of the key components of online learning, they discuss the method of implementing the PLC and the major outcomes and then offer recommendations for starting a PLC within institutions of higher ed.

      10/10

    1. Thomas and Gilbert offer a literature review of current technologies available to improve athlete performance. They provide a brief theoretical foundation for the technologies and how they can be sued to improve athletic and personal performance.

      8/10

    1. The study examines uses of mobile technology, namely cloud computing and self assessment, to improve nursing instruction. The authors evaluate mlearning environments and the potential barriers to their success.

      9/10

    1. Coffey argues the effectiveness of online literature discussions in the elementary classroom. Addressing both synchronous and asynchronous environments, she suggests that computer-based discussions can enhance understanding of literature and promote community within the classroom.

      10/10

    1. This manual, published by Hanover Research, outlines theory and practice of technology integration in the K-12 classroom and provides key strategies for professional development to equip teachers to successfully integrate technology.

      10/10

    1. The authors present the benefits of coaching in professional development for educators in today's technologically advanced classrooms. Of particular interest is the explanation of the different methods of coaching: executive, coactive, cognitive, and instructional. They suggest that coaching provides more successful outcomes than single workshops and stress that finding the correct method for each situation and organization is crucial.

      10/10

    1. Davis and Curry stress the importance of tech coaches in schools to help instructors integrate technology effectively. They present key factors to consider when using tech coaching, including the importance of having a clear plan and defined roles.

      8/10

    1. To optimize learners' experience and the efficacy of learning outcomes, instructors need to consider how technology can offer approaches better suited to adult learning.

      This website from University of Arizona provides a list of trends and issues in learning technologies

      Rating 9/10

    1. Teaching and learning methods: opreparing for teaching ofacilitating the integration of knowledge, skills and attitudes oteaching and learning in groups ofacilitating learning and setting ground rules oexplaining ogroup dynamics omanaging the group olectures osmall group teaching methods and discussion techniques oseminars and tutorials ocomputer based teaching and learning – information technology and the World Wide Web ointroducing problem based learning ocase based learning and clinical scenarios

      this website is consisted of available resources.

      Rating: 9/10

    1. a promising technology for decades that's never truly caught on. That's constantly changing with the current wave of VR products,

      PC magazine is a online compuer magazine, based on popular topics ranging form hackers to smartphones.

      Rating: 9/10

    1. As educational technologies, instructional design and online learning/content delivery platforms keep evolving, more learners with more needs and motives will be drawn to taking online courses – a growing demand that in turn will spur further improvements in technology and delivery.

      Educational Technology offers free articles with sources.

      Rating: 5/10

    1. From Peg Cheechi, an instructional designer at Rush University: informing faculty members about the advantages of working with experts in course design.

      The Chronicle of Higher Education is a website and newspaper informing students and faculty of college affairs and news.

      Rating: 9/10

    1. This book is current from 2015 and is one stop shopping for technology integration in schools. Integrations and Blooms taxonomy theory, ISTE standards, pathways (yes, it is still a slow process), understanding about classroom set up when using technology and learning theories, online, web 2.0, teacher resources, multilingual tools, different screens, digital cameras, and COPPA, Privacy, and Copyright laws. If you are looking for a job in technology integration in schools this is a must read and resource manual. rating 10/10

    1. This ebook talks about autism and the college student. It is the responsibility of colleges and universities to accommodate people with disabilities including those with autism. If a child has an IEP in most cases he can expect to receive the same or adequate accommodations. Some assistive technologies that universities can offer are computers, Live Scrib smart pens, calculators, Dragon Voice recognition software. The importance of knowing and understanding that there are a wide spectrum on the autistic scale means that with assistive technology an entire door is open to people that can lead to more independence and positive contributions to the world. For reference pages 12, 16, and 19 directly discuss AT. Score 9/10

    1. This is an interesting article for assistive technology in adult literacy as you can listen to it like a person with LD would. Initially, it was beneficial, but load times and generic voice are challenging for me, but I am not used to using the AT device. Also interesting is the lack of study on the matter of LD in adult literacy, and therefore this study is really "surveying the gaps." Sadly, what we do know is that minority LD students rates for graduation are lower than whites with LD, and that the dropout rates are higher as well. LD students access to AT may be key to understanding the dynamics of graduation and drop out rates in addition to literacy. A proven solution is small group tutoring with AT as it can be empowering and enabling LD students to learn.

    1. This article studies assistive technology and website courses the usage, extent of use, and patterns of 964 students with and without LD. The study showed that student's with LD accessed their online classroom more times than students without LD. In addition, LD student's posted more messages in the classroom, understand better how to use the classroom forum, and assistive technology. The study used the Hope Scale and the Subject of Well Being Scale through questionnaires where in both the student's scored higher than those without LD. I like the article, easy to understand and not complicated. 8/10

    1. This article discusses the narrowing gap between asisstive technology and instructional technology. Assistive Technology are strategies (although techniques in another article) used by learners with disabilities to overcome adversity in their education. Many of the technologies used in school today also assist those with disabilities. This is exciting because as technology grows people that have trouble reading printed material, or understanding material can use computer devices to read, learn, and understand.

    1. This web page can be used in many ways because it has theories from the old to new in education and technology, and from institutions to working environments, and military. You will find George Bush, Steve Jobs, and Seymour Papert from MIT, just to name a few.

      It is really nice to see new and not so new perspectives of people that do not provide learning theories, but combine learning theories with technology, which to me is relevant for today's educators and learners. 5/10

    1. This article offers insight to technology integration for adults in Arizona. Recognizing the importance of technology in education, Arizona has put together a plan on integration for adult education. Using trends, understanding challenges, devising strategies to meet those challenges now and in the future, and meeting the expectations of how a successful learner is defined are a part of this plan for Arizona. It starts with a vision and three goals for Arizona. From there the goals and trends are implemented in short term, mid term, and long term goals over five plus years. With expecting challenges they are able to address them head on and use innovative practices. 8/10

    1. The text "Adult Learners Come to Campus With Unique Technology Needs" illustrates the barriers to learning that surround a learner's experience with technology. Author David Hutchins suggests having inclusive discussions with diverse sets of technology users to best determine their needs, issues, and reasonable solutions for support. Multi-level support for multiple generations of learners includes the instructors, administration, and IT teams that work together to improve education via technology. Embedding links throughout the text re-direct the reader to valuable resources for further review. Rating: 7/10

    2. Hutchins addresses the need for institutions of higher education to meet the growing population of adult learners who are returning to school to gain relevant professional skills. The three recommendations are solutions-focused and practical.

      7/10

    1. Section 508 compliance is discussed to support instructors knowledge of section 508 and how to begin the process of ensuring instructional content is 508 compliant. Section 508 of the federal Rehabilitation Act governs access of media to all persons whether they have a disability or not. Including captions, audio description, and accessible video players are vital to compliance. Compliance with 508 is necessary given that data that illustrates the percent of employees that have need for accommodations to support their learning. This brief article seems highly related to Universal Design of Learning. Rating: 10/10

    1. Leaders must weigh the pros and cons of using time, a valuable resource, to teach new technologies to faculty, and, further down the line, for faculty to teach to students.

      The article focuses on the topic of how some adults are being challenged by new technology. Although the new technology has some exciting new features to assist teachers these days. Technology today is different and adult learners are faced with difficulty in trying to use it. The author expresses the four cognitive levels of knowledge (unconscious not knowing, conscious no knowing, conscious knowing, and unconscious not knowing). Not only is it difficult for the learners but it is difficult for the teacher to implement technology into curriculum. In this article, different types of technology has been researched to determine what type is good for adult students. Rating: 4/5

    1. the younger educators are more inclined to use technology to enhance learning. It can be very time consuming and because of this many enthusiastic educators fall by the way and refuse to preserve with the task of using technology in the classroom.

      This author of this article discusses the topic of how some teachers are comfortable with their form of teaching with no technology in their curriculum or their classroom. The author expresses that technology promotes changes in behavior and grasping teaching skills. The use of technology in the classroom is a good tool for the students. Rating: 4/5

    1. ABE includes programs thatprovide instruction in reading, writing, math, communications, and other basicskills as it prepares these students to take the General Educational Development(GED) exam.

      The article was great resource for the topic for technology and how it is being used in the classroom, specifically in basic skills (reading, writing, math, and communication) that assist the student to take the GED exam. The article expresses on the topics of the impact of technology, technology integration, technology barriers/anxiety, the need for the study, and the research results. Rating: 4/5

  3. www.calpro-online.org www.calpro-online.org
    1. The uniqueeducational benefits as well as limitations of the four approachesare technology as curriculum, as delivery mechanism, ascomplement to instruction, and as instructional tool.

      The article expressed the topic of technology in adult learning. The author described on the topics and provided the benefits and limitations of the following five topics: Technology as Curriculum, Technology as Delivery Mechanism, Technology as a Complement to Instruction, Technology as an Instructional Tool, Choosing and Using the Different Approaches. Rate 4/5

    1. Although educators may use technology for personal use, technology may not be used to supportlearningor prepare students for thecurrent digital culture.

      This article focused on how K-8 and K-5 classrooms fail to use the technology in their classrooms. In the first section of this article, the author defines the problem and provides a conceptual framework for the problem. In the second section of this article, the author presents the research, data that was collected during the study, and the participants that were involved. In section three, the project description and the projected goal was shared. Along with the literature that was reviewed, obstacles that were encountered, evaluation, and changes that were made to change the predicted outcome. The last section, section four concluded with the strengths, limitations, other approaches that were encountered during the project. The project closed out with the analysis, changes that effected the project/social change, and future research. Rate: 4/5

    1. Faculty must spend time learning how to use the technology and ensuring that adequate institutional support is present to make the technology work.

      This article reflects on how technology is incorporated into adult learning (Androgogy). Which is explained by using the six assumptions and their implications for technology-based instruction (The Learners Need to Know, The Learner’s Self-concept, The Role of the Learner’s Experience, A Student’s Readiness to Learn, The Student’s Orientation to Learning, Students’ Motivation to Learn. Rate: 3/5

    1. The Digital Promise article presents four major factors to consider when implementing technology for adult learning purposes. The factors include flexibility and benefits of blended learning, data use to support development of instruction, environments with diverse technology available support various learners, and allow the instructor's role to change to meet learner needs. Issues related to each factor are shared and suggestions for resolutions are provided. Rating: 7/10-a good resource for introduction to factors and issues in adult learning via technology.

    1. The article emphasizes the term technology and pedagogy. The author explains learning environments, learning styles, how technology impacts pedagogy, and how technology is good for students. Rating: 5/5

    1. New technologies make it possible for students to tailor their course schedules, online classes, and brick-and- mortar learning venues to attain targeted degrees.

      With society and technology always changing. Learning new technology is key to getting ahead in higher education. Rate: 3/5

    1. Technology helps change the student/teacher roles and relationships: students take responsibility for their learning outcomes, while teachers become guides and facilitators. Technology lends itself as the multidimensional tool that assists that process.

      5) This article defines the importance of having technology in the classroom and how it is used to improve the skills/minds of students. It includes activities and other resources to assist the reader.

    1. Some of our adult-ed students take their courses virtually, with students checking in with teachers via Skype or by email, but a majority spend at least some time in a classroom.

      This article expresses how learning can be taught using the internet and one does not have to be in class to learn.

  4. Oct 2019
  5. Apr 2019
    1. Ashley Norris is the Chief Academic Officer at ProctorU, an organization that provides online exam proctoring for schools. This article has an interesting overview of the negative side of technology advancements and what that has meant for student's ability to cheat. While the article does culminate as an ad, of sorts, for ProctorU, it is an interesting read and sparks thoughts on ProctorU's use of both human monitors for testing but also their integration of Artificial Intelligence into the process.

      Rating: 9/10.

    1. The article, published in Cornell University's React publication, is an overview of technology that is currently being used in the classroom. There is an overview of interactive abilities using these technologies and a conclusion that technology should always be used to enhance and not replace.

      Rating: 6/10. Short.

    1. This article is a breakdown from the U.S. Department of Education around the types of learning environments that exist in the technology arena. It provides examples of schools fulfilling these different environments and offers a collection fo additional resources.

      Rating: 9/10

    1. The author, Susan Grajek, formerly of Yale University is the Vice President for Communities and Research at EDUCAUSE. Grajek brings together 5 leaders in higher education and technology to discuss the future of technology in the higher education arena. The article addresses the progress that needs to be made, especially in the adult education portion of higher eduction and acknowledges that the traditional 18-22 college student population is very small and that there is so much more of the market that needs to be reached.

      Rating: 9/10.

    1. This journal article, written by Amaury Nora, who is currently the Dean for Research at the University of Texas San Antonio and Blanca Plazas Snyder who was pursuing a degree in educational psychology at the time this article as written. The author's bring an honest review of technology and include the benefits, the downfalls and they identify areas where more research needs to be conducted (especially around student persistence).

      Rating: 9/10. The article is informative and takes many perspectives. The only flaw is that when discussing technology in Higher Education, this article is from 2008, but it was also helpful to get the perspective from 10 years ago.

  6. Mar 2019
    1. This paper addresses the question about how today’s modern schools can prepare learners for the future in the age of technology. The response to this question is discussion around innovative learning environments that involve the use of technology. Technology has been a concern for the rapid change in the educational landscape and this paper aims to highlight transformation and innovation in relation to technology for teaching and learning. 9/10 for helpful diagrams and tables.

    1. This paper discusses the idea that design is responsible for developing learning and teaching in technology rich environments. This paper argues Cultural Historical Activity Theory. This paper uses this perspective to discuss their ideas of design in connection with the digital age. This paper is written from the perspective German, Nordic, Russian and Vygotskyan concepts that seek to define the relationship between learning and teaching in relation to design. Rating 9/10 for mixing design with digital learning

    1. This article is about technology integration in the classroom and how to support teachers and schools during the process. It provides recommendations on how to handle distractions and the level of engagement that should be happening between peers. This article takes a deep dive into learning in general and how it prepares students for the real world. Rating: 7/10

    1. At a recent keynote speech (2016), Richard Culatta, former director of the Office of Educational Technology for the US Department of Education, noted that more than half of higher education enrollments for 2016 are nontraditional students.

      Reinventing higher education is essential for diverse learners. A study in 2016 found that more than half of higher education students are "nontraditional students." Meaning they need special accommodations. One essential accommodation of online learning is that students can watch or reread content multiple times if needed. This is in contrast to a traditional classroom where the lecture can only be heard once. Also, while text only information is not for everyone, it is still essential to blind students. But, alternatives such as slide shows must also be present. To add in more technology one must involve administration, staff and faculty before jumping in too quickly.

      Rating 6/10

    1. This article is for teachers and contains multiple resources about how to integrate technology into the classroom and the different types of technology integration. This article is full of examples and ideas teachers can use to facilitate technology in the classroom. Rating: 9/10 for use of examples and practical application.

    1. The use of digital technologies across the adult life span in distance education.

      Research article. This article explores how older and younger student approach studying through the use of technology and reveals that those in older age groups were more likely to use technology in deep in focused ways to study once they got the hang of it and younger groups were more likely to remain on the surface level of a variety of technologies.

    1. Bridging Formal and Informal Learning Through Technology in the Twenty-First Century: Issues and Challenges

      From Springer Link, this is an abstract from a book titled, Bridging Formal and Informal Learning Through Technology in the Twenty-First Century: Issues and Challenges. While the entire content is not here, if purchased, this book/download could offer a large amount of useful information about this topic. It covers learning typically associated with technology such as social networking, game-based learning and digital making.

      Rating 7/10

    2. bridging formal and informal learning through technology in the twenty first century: issues and challenges This article is in a fully online journal. It relates to schools but the learning is by students, not teachers. However, professional development is called for. The article addresses the desired topic in that it refers to social networking and other technology enabled forms of learning; however, it does not seem to be substantive enough to be tremendously helpful. rating 1/1

    1. Educational technology professional development as transformative learning opportunities

      Educational technology professional development can transform learning opportunities. This article focuses on adult learning theory as technology can be "intimidating and frustrating." All of this spiked my interest and I was excited to read more. However, to read more you must purchase the content of the entire article. So, in all this left me disappointed. Rating 2/10

    1. 1Engaging Adults Learners with TechnologyThrough hands-on experience and reviewing the literature, two instruction librarians explore and model best practice

      This article comes from the Twin Cities Campus Library and discusses how to engage adult learners with technology. First, it looks at Kolb's learning model of instructional design which includes that adults must have applying, awakening, practicing and observing. It is also imperative to have hands on learning when it comes to technology. Rating 7/10

    1. Technology Starts with Professional Development and Training

      This EdTech article focuses on the fact that integration of technology MUST start with an emphasis on coaching and teaching teachers first. One district, Calcasieu Parish Public Schools has found that you must, "select technology that supports our learning goals rather than building curriculum around technology." and "We don't put technology into the classroom without first giving hands-on trainings to teachers." Because of the need to train teachers first, there is an entire section of this article devoted to how adults learn! However, this article simply talks about adult learning for educators and how professional development is best during the day to minimize stresses for teachers. Rating 6/10

    1. AMR in 120 Seconds

      This YouTube video is a quick overview of the SAMR model of instruction essential for universal design. "S" stands for substitution - New tech replaces old material but does not change text. "A" stands for augmentation - students work to complete a task such as on google docs. "M" stands for modification - tech is used to redesign part of task and transform learning. Ex. google docs comment feature provides instant feedback. "R" stands for redefinition - design and create new tasks. Ex. communicating across world through google docs, discussing it through google voice and recording it all as presentation. Rating 10/10

    1. Reading on the web is a critical skill for engaging content online. They can be viewed as “exploring,” or “navigating the web.” Just as traditional reading requires knowledge of the text and concepts of print, reading online requires a basic understanding of web mechanics. Good online readers know the tools and strategies that can be used to search for and locate people, resources, and information. They then know how to judge the credibility of these sources.1 The web literacy skills and competencies identified under reading on the web are as follows. Search

      Web Literacy 2.0 discusses how people use web literacy in their everyday lives. For example, "navigating the web" needs to be taught just as the concepts of print do. Quality online readers know where to look, what to ignore, and how to locate information. Writing on the web is also a skill that needs to be explicitly taught. A writer must be able to learn through making and creating. They must be able to communicate their ideas in written word, through presentations as well as through well organized and chosen aesthetics. Rating 10/10

    1. Learning Technologies that Increase the Impact of Classroom Training

      Learning Technologies the Increase the Impact of Classroom Training stresses that with technology the classroom is no longer teacher-centered but rather a more active learning approach that meets the needs of more learners. Technology driven activities to include in teaching are create a blog or wiki, create a podcast or publish students work. All of these offer a great way to engage learners but have changed the environment for the learner significantly. Rating 8/10

    2. Learning Technologies that Increase the Impact of Classroom Training

      Training Industry published this article about some learning technologies that increase the impact of classroom training. These can include class-oriented webpages, multimedia presentations, and activities, as well as web-based scoring systems and supplements. For instance, learners could collectively create a blog or a webcast and use those tools to communicate with each other to help facilitate learning. This is helpful when teaching a technology-fluent group that is excited to do hands-on activities. 6/10

    1. “In the USA, EdTech product catalogues are either too complex for many teachers to use, not objective or comprehensive enough, or not based on credible user reviews (which often have more

      In this article, the author argues that the US can learn something about technology from the rest of the world. Chile, for example, has more cellular phones than the US but is considered a third world country. What can the US learn from this? The ed tech catalogues are too complex and too challenging for teachers to use. The article states, “In the USA, EdTech product catalogues are either too complex for many teachers to use, not objective or comprehensive enough, or not based on credible user reviews (which often have more weight than experimental evidence or product marketing),” states the report, crafted from over 100 interviews with educators, policymakers and entrepreneurs, conducted from September to December 2018." The US also needs to extend access to technology out of the schools and into the homes. There needs to be more groundwork from the US to create a better system. Rating 7/10

    1. This article contains the following sections:Getting Started Integrating Technology Across the Access Spectrum Getting to "Seamless" Integration Tips for Shared Hardware Creating a Professional-Development Plan Hardware and Equipment Using Technology for Feedback and Assessment The Role of Digital Citizenship

      Edutopia presents multiple ways to integrate technology into the classroom efficiently and effectively. The article begins with how to get started. This will help the average teacher create a seamless integration of technology. Then, it moves on to how to use technology across the curriculum, how the school can provide effective professional development to aid in teacher success and how the role of digital citizenship can make or break the effectiveness of the integration.

      Rating 10/10

    1. A Pedagogical Framework for Technology Integration in ESL Classrooms 191is that in an online reading environment designed with embedded compre-hension strategy supports, ELLs’ comprehension gains were significantly associated with their frequency of using coaching avatars that provided sup-port for effective use of reading comprehension strategies (Proctor et al., 2007). Ubiquitous technology environments can arouse student interest in us-ing the technologies (Huang, Huang, Huang, & Lin, 2012; Sandberg, Maris, & de Geus, 2011) and promote better learning outcomes in listening, speak-ing and vocabulary acquisition (Gromik, 2012; Liu & Chu, 2010; Sandberg et al., 2011). Sandberg et al. (2011) observed that when students took home a smartphone to learn English about zoo animals, they were motivated to use it in their spare time, which enabled them to outperform those who did not take the mobile applications home. Technologies designed to adapt to individual learners’ needs have also demonstrated positive effects in promoting learning (Lo, Wang, & Yeh, 2004; Chen & Chung, 2008; Hsu, Hwang, & Chang, 2010; Jia, Chen, Ding, & Ruan, 2012; Wible, Kuo, Chien, Liu, & Tsao, 2001). Lo et al. (2004) used a hypermedia-based English prepositions learning system2 to diagnose students’ errors and provide adaptive remedial instructions, which signifi-cantly improved students’ confidence and learning outcomes. Challenges. The degree of freedom that teachers should give students when students use technology for language learning deserves exploration. Experiments have shown that, when students were free to choose how and when to use CALL, their choices could lead to poor learning and wasted time (Sciarone & Meijer, 1993). Another challenge is that, although learning tools provide easy access to resources, learners may feel overwhelmed by large amounts of information and become passive receivers of knowledge (Schmid, 2008). Easy access to resources can encourage laziness and pas-sivity of learners when it comes to checking materials and exploring knowl-edge themselves.

      This paper exemplifies the technology integration into an ESL classroom. The author has found many great things about using technology to teach her students as well as many challenges associated with it. Some of the positive ways technology has helped her teaching is the student interest in technology, the scaffolds it can provide for these students and how it can adapt to students individual needs. On the flip side, some of the challenges technology presents for this ESL classroom are the initial engagement with technology is short lived, teachers are not trained adequately and there are few guidelines to provide a framework for ESL teachers. Rating 8/10

    1. nontraditional students. The education department at OSU-M is housed within the School of Teaching and Learning and the Integrated Teaching and Learning (ITL) section. The Integrated Teaching and Learning section of the College of Education serves those preservice teachers who are studying to be teachers of children age 3 to Grade 8. The Ohio State University Master of Education degree, the degree that offers course requirements for licensure in elementary and middle childhood, is a five-quarter, graduate licensure program. Students enter the program with a B.A. in Elementary Education or a similar field. We license approximately 24 teachers per year. Class size ranges from 12 through 24 students. During the bachelor’s program, student studies are focused on theories of child development and learning, primary reading and language courses, general liberal arts courses, content courses, and two beginning field courses. At least one field placement during the undergraduate coursework takes place in an urban school. Following admission to the graduate program in education, students begin their coursework in general pedagogy and specific methods: social studies, mathematics, language arts, reading, and science. During this year and a half of studies, students are in the field each week for 4-10 hours and have a 12- to15-day period toward the end of the two methods block quarters when they create and implement lessons in their field classroom. All students complete two separate placements in teams of two. Field placements are primarily in suburban and rural schools. Following these field placements, students have one quarter of student teaching and one quarter for a master’s project, including a comprehensive portfolio and a research paper. Experiences With Technology During the undergraduate program students take one technology course. This course is intended to provide students with exposure to the basic knowledge of computer hardware and an introduction to traditional educational software. During this course, students are required to complete an “All About Me,” project (see Powerpoint 1) for which students familiarize themselves with tools such as the scanner, digital camera, clipart, and presentation software. Figure 1. The technology teaching lab After students are admitted to the master’s licensure program, they take one basic technology course that covers other technologies available to elementary education teachers (e.g., Ellison cutters, laminating machines, filmstrip projectors, video projectors, enlargers), and they continue their development of computer knowledge. The two courses, one in the undergraduate program and the other in the graduate program, are the only two stand-alone courses on technology. After students have completed the basic technology course in the graduate program, they begin their methods courses. Throughout the methods coursework, students are asked to use technology when appropriate to enhance their teaching. In addition to this expectation, instructors of the methods courses integrate technology into their teaching to serve as a model of ways in which technology can enhance learning in the particular subject areas. During the two methods course quarters, students attend a lab course entitled the Technology Teaching Lab (TTL). The goal for this course is to increase the use of technology in students’ lessons in ways that will enhance their teaching. The TTL is a series of 2-hour labs that runs concurrently with our methods blocks. The purpose of this lab is to provide the preservice teachers in our elementary education program opportunities to create, with assistance, technology-enhanced lessons for their field placements. The lab course provides the students with instruction, opportunities, and equipment to take their technology-enhanced lessons directly to the field.

      The Ohio State University is now integrating technology into their Education Master's program. Students are expected as undergraduates to take an introductory technology course. As part of the master's program, students are required to take another technology course. Students are also expected to integrate technology into their two methods courses. To help with this they have a "lab" (which is traditionally thought to parallel science courses) with technology instructors to help them with their methods courses.<br> Instructors are expected to model the technology integration and help students plan a curriculum that integrates technology to aid in the learning of most students.

      Rating 9/10

    1. ommunities using technology in ambitious and innovative ways to support adult learners. Our Beacons’ stories of how they address common challenges show what it takes to develop and scale effective adult learning across multiple partnerships. Through their work at the leading edge of integrating technology into adult learning, we can understand and amplify new models and practices.

      The Beacon Project focuses on ways in which multiple companies have taken to using technology to train adult learners. One example is a company called Access Green. This successful company was started by a wealthy enturpeanur that had been trained at one of the best business schools in the country. He believes that he can provide the same training to the underprivileged through technology. This is his way of giving back and not just helping these people by giving them a job, but rather an education. Rating 7/10

    1. Learning House offered recommendations based on the study's findings. They include: mandatory or incentivized training for instructors who have not taught online. a regular feedback cycle for continuous professional development. a regular feedback cycle for instructor evaluation, including peer feedback. a uniform learning experience for standard components of an online course.

      This article discusses whether or not online professors are assessed and by whom. Nearly 60% of online teachers are never evaluated! Because of this Learning House recommends incentivized trainings, regular feedback/evaluation, professional development and a uniform learning experience with standard components for all online classes. Rating 6/10

    1. Effective Classroom Practices To Transform Education DOI:https://dx.doi.org/10.1787/9789264293243-en Teachers are the most important school-related factor influencing student learning. Teachers can help level the playing field and provide opportunities for success to all their students. They can inspire students to innovate; to think and reflect and to work in collaboration with others.

      This 116 page document includes everything from how to effectively use technology in the classroom to alternative education methods as a lever for teaching innovation. The section I found most helpful was how to effectively use technology in the classroom starting on page 75. Rating 8/10

    1. A New Report: Reimagining the Role of Technology in Higher Education The U.S. Department of Education Office of Educational Technology recently released Reimagining the Role of Technology in Higher Education, a supplement to the 2016 National Education Technology Plan (NETP). The NETP calls for technology-supported, transformational learning in higher education. This vision emphasizes everywhere, all-the-time learning, improved access to learning opportunities, and a level playing field for students with diverse backgrounds. Below is a high-level summary of the report. The first step to achieving this vision is to recognize that higher education is comprised of students of all ages, races, socioeconomic backgrounds and learning abilities. More than 18-year-old high school graduates, new students include returning veterans and single moms. Forty-three percent of students attend part-time and 62 percent work either full-time or part-time. Two-thirds transfer before completing their degree. The student body, and the needs and goals of the student body, have never been so diverse, and higher education has never been more important to those who seek it. Supporting diverse needs and goals requires a student-centered higher education ecosystem that is flexible, integrated and efficient. The NETP believes this new ecosystem must support transformative learning through technology, teaching with technology and assessments enabled by technology. Educators, institutions and educational technology developers should collaborate across institutions to determine the best way to use technology to improve learning outcomes and create new learning experiences and delivery systems. Use data to study how students learn and identify the causes of success and failure. Develop new, standardized tools that enable real-time data analysis. Use digital learning materials to improve access to collaborative and project-based learning, and adopt learning resource design standards for evaluating learning resources. In addition to enhancing student learning experiences, technology and data should be used to improve instructional approaches, develop and implement new, research-based teaching models, and provide academic and non-academic support. Such initiatives must be promoted at the institutional level and include the sharing of information and best practices for various applications. Institutions must also provide training, technical support and professional development opportunities for educators. Assessments enabled by technology should allow for personalization and provide frequent feedback to improve student performance. This will also help faculty better understand and measure student progress. Technology-enabled assessment systems should be open, transparent and auditable, making them less susceptible to fraud and waste. They should create assessment activities that replicate real-world experiences to better prepare students for their careers. Implementing new learning and instructional models and modern assessments requires a robust IT infrastructure. However, this infrastructure must integrate formal, informal, workplace and mobile learning environments to support success for a diverse student body. Student learning and outcome data should be integrated across the higher education ecosystem while meeting security and privacy requirements. Investment decisions should be the result of collaboration between senior administrators, academic leadership and IT. Student feedback should be considered as well. Of course, technological change in higher education requires strong leadership and a culture that promotes collaboration and innovation. A strategic plan should welcome input from educators, students, technology providers, other institutions, and community and economic development organizations. An expanded strategic network can only improve system operability, transparency, innovatio

      Technology is allowing more people of different ages and different cultures to access education. For technology in education to be effective administration needs to offer support and collaboration. Rating 5/10

    1. After a full day of teaching at Boston College, Karen Arnold had to find time to read her students’ contributions to an online discussion board. Each was required to write at least one post, and, as usual, they seemed to have waited to do it until the night before the deadline. “They would just blather something,” said Arnold, who teaches higher education and educational administration. “They didn’t have a conversation. It was more like a hoop-jumping exercise.” That was around 2008, and Arnold has avoided assigning online discussions ever since. Student and instructor at Bronx Community College (Photo by Ryan Brenizer) Like other faculty with memories of failed experiments such as these, she’s pushing back against the widespread notion that technology can necessarily improve teaching and cut costs. “We are fooling ourselves that we’re getting more efficient,” she said. Related: MOOC bandwagon shows signs of slowing down It’s been a high-stakes bet. Universities and colleges are marketing themselves to tech-savvy teenagers while promising higher productivity and financial savings. They will pour $10.4 billion into education technology this year, according to the Center for Digital Education, from computers to in-class gadgets such as digital projectors and wireless “clickers” that let students answer questions electronically. “We are fooling ourselves that we’re getting more efficient.” Karen Arnold, Boston College But professors say they don’t have enough help to use this technology effectively, haven’t seen results from it, and fear that the cost savings administrators keep insisting that technology will bring could mean their own careers are on the line. That’s left many in the university ranks rolling their eyes when the next “innovation” pops up. “We’ve been hearing over the last four or five years that technology is going to reduce costs, increase quality and increase access,” said Diane Harley, director of the Higher Education in the Digital Age project at University of California, Berkeley. She doesn’t think it can do all three of those things. “I always say, pick two.” Not that professors have completely resisted the trend. Nearly 75 percent have tried a new technology in their classes in the past year, according to a survey of 1,600 of them by Faculty Focus, a newsletter that shares effective teaching practices. Yet 34 percent said keeping up with technology was either “moderately” or “very” problematic. Related: As online courses expand, so do questions about ownership One of the most common complaints from faculty is that much of this technology creates more work, not less, a survey of 42 professors by David R. Johnson, a sociology researcher at Rice University, found. One of the reasons for this inefficiency is that professors adopt educational technology from companies that market it to them directly, even when their universities aren’t equipped to troubleshoot or upgrade it, said Gary W. Matkin, dean of continuing education, distance learning, and summer session at the University of California, Irvine. Then, when something even better comes along, faculty and universities chase after that. “It produces this technology war,” said Matkin. He thinks more universities will eventually switch to the model used by many corporations in which only certain technology is allowed. That way they’ll be better able to manage it — and track the results. Related: Want higher-ed reform? You may be surprised where you’ll find it Many schools have used this model to adopt the wireless clickers — or “student response systems” — in large classrooms. Allowing students to use the TV remote-style clickers to collectively answer questions can keep them engaged in lecture classes, according to a study at Canisius College, which found that student grades increased by 4.7 percent in classes that used clickers. But the technology’s impact goes only so far. In another study released this year, by Butler University professor Juan Pablo Rodriquez Prieto, language students who took clicker-based quizzes performed about 4.5 percent worse than classmates who used pencil and paper. Clare O’Connor, a Boston College biology professor who teaches several large classes and uses clickers regularly, agrees that they have limitations. She doesn’t use them for quizzes or tests, she said. “I like students to have the opportunities to change their answers,” she said. “If students have to answer when a question appears on the screen, you eliminate the possibility of more reflective answers.” One way schools have tried to lower the cost of education is by using another kind of technology: online courses. Yet even after teaching English online for 15 years, Wright State University-Lake Campus’ Martin Kich believes in-person courses offer students far more. Related: Colleges take cues from private business to improve their customer service He said he has to assign what he calls “busy work” to online classes simply to check that students are completing assignments, since there’s no opportunity to gather and discuss. “Academically, they are very suspect,” Kich said of online courses. Instead of lectures, online courses often use PowerPoint to present material. But studies have found that students, when given the ability to see lectures via PowerPoint — both online and in person — slack on doing their own assigned reading. “Students perceive the teachers will highlight all of the material worth considering in the textbook,” University of Central Missouri professor Thomas M. Mitchell wrote in a study of the use of PowerPoint in classes. “Unfortunately, students accept this efficient and time-saving system as a normal way of learning and disregard reading as an effective method of acquiring information.” As for Arnold, she abandoned discussion boards until her university upgraded to Canvas — an online learning management system — and encouraged professors to use it starting this year. After getting student feedback, she assigned two students to moderate the discussion board each week, filling it with questions that would drive conversation. At the start of class, the two students recap the results, saving Arnold the need to keep daily tabs on the board. “The good and bad thing about technology is it will do anything,” she said. But “you have to have time at the expense of other things you could be doing to figure it out.”   This story was produced by The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, independent news website focused on inequality and innovation in education. This article was originally published on The Heching Report and authored by Ryan Derousseau. Read the original article. Spread the love

      Technology has been found to be more of a hindrance in higher education that a help. Professors claim that students are simply doing the minimal amount of work to get by and online discussions are inefficient. This is making our education system less engaging and with less learning.

    1. Laboratory activities and constructivism are two notions that have been playing significant roles in science education. Despite common beliefs about the importance of laboratory activities, reviews reported inconsistent results about the effectiveness of laboratory activities. Since laboratory activities can be expensive and take more time, there is an effort to introduce virtual laboratory activities. This study aims at exploring the learning environment created by a virtual laboratory and a real laboratory. A quasi experimental study was conducted at two grade ten classes at a state high school in Bandung, Indonesia. Data were collected using a questionnaire called Constructivist Learning Environment Survey (CLES) before and after the laboratory activities. The results show that both types of laboratories can create constructivist learning environments. Each type of laboratory activity, however, may be stronger in improving certain aspects compared to the other. While a virtual laboratory is stronger in improving critical voice and personal relevance, real laboratory activities promote aspects of personal relevance, uncertainty and student negotiation. This study suggests that instead of setting one type of laboratory against the other, lessons and follow up studies should focus on how to combine both types of laboratories to support better learning.

      In this peer-reviewed study, two tenth-grade classes were analyzed as they used either a virtual or a real laboratory to accomplish learning tasks. The question raised was whether a real or a virtual laboratory was more conducive to constructivist learning. The study concluded that a real lab is better than a virtual one to trigger constructivist learning. This is of importance to me because I teach adults about software in both virtual and real laboratories, and when I develop content, I try to use the constructivist theory as much as possible as I find it works best for my audience, in addition to making novel content more relatable. Please note: I could not put the annotation on the text because the paper opened in a popup page that does not work with Hypothes.is. 7/10

    1. How to Design Education for Adults

      This wonderful how-to by Southern New Hampshire University provided several well explained tips about what adults need in their learning environments, including their own learning theory, goals, relevant instruction, treatment by the teacher, and participation. These are important things to keep in mind when training working adults because it may have an impact on what information is offered and how it is presented. I will use the information in this article later to help me present content in a meaningful way for my working adult learners. I want the content to be as relevant and inviting to them as possible. 9/10

    1. 6 Effective Strategies for Teaching Adults

      This article from Point Park University provides several methods one can use to help educate adults. Ideas presented include ensuring content is relevant, knowing the audience, igniting emotion in the audience, ensuring assignments are attainable, and providing constructive feedback. I find these especially helpful because of my work, which often involves teaching adults who are busy and sometimes uninterested in my content. The section that will help me most is "Encourage Exploration." Because I'm training on a software tool, I want learners to go into the software and make mistakes and learn from them. I want them to poke around! It can be difficult to convince a class of disgruntled 60-year-old men who are mad that things are changing to go play with a complex software tool like children. 7/10

    1. Adults & Learning: How to Provide for Working Professionals

      The Digital Marketing Institute published this article to help those who provide training for professional adults. It echoes a lot of what I've read in other articles about teaching adults: The goals are different, and they have different needs from the instructor than children do. I liked that this article mentioned that many professional adults find technology to be a barrier, but I wish there were more information about it. The article discussed several of the biggest challenges for adult learners, which was a nice change from the quintessential adult learner article that focuses on what learners need. I also want to know what they don't need. Some of the barriers to learning include a lack of time, responsibilities, financial stressors, fear of technology, and trouble identifying the ideal learning path. 8/10

    1. Training Older Adults To Use New Technology

      This article, published in the Journals of Gerontology, discusses a study that focused on teaching older adults to use technology. This is often discussed in a practical sense, with many how-to's. This article, however, discusses the theory behind gerontological learning. Older adults don't generally learn the same way younger adults do. Therefore, it is important to provide them with practice that shows tasks have continuity, to ensure the important task components are focused on strongly, and to consider whether the learning goals are appropriate for the learner. Representative design is addressed here. This is the first time I've heard of representative design. I teach many people over the age of 60 to use technology, so it is important for me to know the theory that will help them learn best. Interestingly,this article mentioned that performance should be assessed based on a comparison of the older adult's environment. I wish I could use that more in my work, but it's a young person's world now. 9/10

    1. Effective Integration of Technology and Instructor-Led Training to Promote Soft Skills Mastery

      The Access Technologies Group published this article to discuss purposeful use of technology in ILT environments whose goal was to teach soft skills. The article claims that blended learning is the ideal delivery technique because it provides the ease of e-learning with the face-to-face time necessary to develop soft skills. It is critical to the success of the training program to integrate e-learning and ILT seamlessly to ensure the two produce synergy without limiting themselves or each other. It is also important that the learners are provided with an environment that suits their learning needs best. Technology and ILT can both provide ways to meet those needs, and where one lacks, the other can fill in. 8/10

    1. Teaching with technology

      The University of Wisconsin - Madison published this helpful, quick guide to assist instructors in using technology to teach others. It discusses some of the technology available to help teach, including Microsoft products, Blackboard, Kaltura, and others. It also discusses some of the tools the school uses to facilitate blended learning. This includes Google Apps, technology-equipped classrooms, and a Quality Matters subscription that helps produce high-quality blended learning products. It is important to incorporate technology in the classroom because it helps to facilitate learning and engage learners. 5/10

    1. designing for sustainable mobile learning: evaluating the concepts formal and informal This is a journal article that is freely available online. They argue that informal learning is more 'enriching' than formal learning. They write about mLearning (mobile learning) and state that some 'design aspects' must be left to learners. This is formatted in the standard way and has the usability one would expect of an online journal article. There are citations as one would expect but I am not qualified to evaluate the information quality. rating 5/5

    1. This article explains just in time learning (such as that which can be done via devices) within the context of higher education. My interest is in public health education, but at this moment, I am not sure how much I can narrow in on that topic, so I will save this for now. This is obviously not a scholarly article but is of some interest nonetheless. rating 2/5

    1. This is specific to Articulate Rise 360 (a rapid development tool) and features brief posts that keep the reader up to date on software changes, which are made frequently. Only a portion of each comment is visible on the main page (just as only a portion of an email is visible without clicking the email) but the subject heading is usually sufficient to describe the content of the post. rating 3/5

    1. This is associated with the e-learning development tool "Articulate Storyline." There are frequent blog posts and they are not limited to or exclusive to the Articulate products. Posts are brief and not all of the content will be new, but there are worthwhile tips to be had and they combine theory (not to the extent that an academic would) with practice. rating 3/5

    1. This page, Top Tools for Learning, is updated every year. It lists and briefly describes the top tech tools for adult learning. For the current (2018) list, they are YouTube, PowerPoint, and Google Search. The list proceeds through the top 200 and there are links to each tool. The purpose of this page is to list them; tutorials, etc. are not offered. Rating 4/5

  7. www.nmc.org www.nmc.org